IQ and grammar

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  • IQ and grammar
  • Junkyard
    Member

    Perhaps even the big-bang happened much earlier that we never thought it couldn’t have not

    this was a comment on the guardian BTL

    “I’m not sure why I should give a shit” says bloke on internet chat bored

    glasgowdan
    Member

    I don’t think grammar and iq are tied to each other. Being young he naturally has a lot to learn. All sounds quite normal.

    jon1973
    Member

    “I didn’t know if I’d done bad” – says kid with IQ of 161

    Yeah, they should dock him 40 points because he doesn’t talk like you think he should.

    Premier Icon richmars
    Subscriber

    IQ tests measure IQ tests.
    I don’t think they indicate much else.

    kerley
    Member

    IQ has absolutely nothing to do with grammar. The IQ tests have no grammar based questions in them, quite rightly.

    I had a relatively high IQ when at school but my English was very average.

    Paul@RTW
    Member

    I blame McDonalds for the yoof of today’s poor grammar. I received a job application and CV written in the present continuous. I’m not bloody lovin’ that.

    Premier Icon thepurist
    Subscriber

    I iz blamez Lolcats for paw grammarz

    Premier Icon amedias
    Subscriber

    “I didn’t know if I’d done bad”

    So what? he’s young, he communicated his thoughts/meaning pretty well, all that shows is that he doesn’t yet have a full knowledge and command of the rules of (a) language.

    It’s perfectly possible to be exceedingly clever and not yet have mastered everything, especially at that age!

    Premier Icon joat
    Subscriber

    In other languages that would be correct. People who speak other languages can also have high IQs. People with high IQs don’t know everything, they just have an increased ability to work things out when they have learnt the rules.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    when they have learnt the rules.

    Not sure what “rules” have to do with the IQ test. From what I remember, it’s having the logical thought processes to work things out. Whereas English grammar is mostly about learning rules.

    Plus, as any fool no, spoken grammar is very different to written grammar. Innit like.

    johnx2
    Member

    For native speakers grammar is descriptive not prescriptive, init?

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    DezB wrote:

    Not sure what “rules” have to do with the IQ test. From what I remember, it’s having the logical thought processes to work things out.

    Though the chap in question appears old enough that he should have been taught the difference between adjectives and adverbs. His high IQ should mean that he has no problem learning such things, at which point being able to apply the rules in the correct way is a logical problem solving process. Clearly there’s been a failure in one of the 3 steps – it seems inconceivable he hasn’t been taught the appropriate rules when he goes to a school interested enough to carry out IQ tests, therefore either he’s not good at absorbing information or not good at applying the rules in a logical way. My understanding is that linguistics is part of IQ.

    His high IQ should mean that he has no problem learning such things, at which point being able to apply the rules in the correct way is a logical problem solving process

    Maybe he just dont give a ****?

    Premier Icon nickc
    Subscriber

    it seems inconceivable he hasn’t been taught the appropriate rules when he goes to a school interested enough to carry out IQ tests,

    colloquialism
    k??l??kw??l?z(?)m/Submit
    noun
    plural noun: colloquialisms
    a word or phrase that is not formal or literary and is used in ordinary or familiar conversation.
    “the colloquialisms of the streets”

    edit: He talks like that, because that’s how he talks with his mates…probably

    johndoh
    Member

    Though the chap in question appears old enough that he should have been taught the difference between adjectives and adverbs.

    Perhaps he *does* know the difference but chooses to speak differently.

    For example, in the written word, the correct way would be to say ‘My friends and I went to…’ however if talking it is perfectly natural (and acceptable) to say ‘Me and my mates went to…’.

    Innit.

    Premier Icon amedias
    Subscriber

    Though the chap in question appears old enough that he should have been taught the difference between adjectives and adverbs. His high IQ should mean that he has no problem learning such things, at which point being able to apply the rules in the correct way is a logical problem solving process. Clearly there’s been a failure in one of the 3 steps – it seems inconceivable he hasn’t been taught the appropriate rules when he goes to a school interested enough to carry out IQ tests, therefore either he’s not good at absorbing information or not good at applying the rules in a logical way. My understanding is that linguistics is part of IQ.

    Or…. he’s been taught the rules, applies them when being formally assessed (schoolwork/exams etc.) but the rest of the time just talks how kids talk and as long as people understand him cares no more about it?

    In the same way I have a different formal writing style to forum posting style, and I adjust my verbal grammar and vocabulary to the audience I’m interacting with.

    Or even wackier theory…has been taught the rules, understands them but just doesn’t care as it’s not important to him.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    John Doe wrote:

    Perhaps he *does* know the difference but chooses to speak different

    Fixed 😉

    Premier Icon nickc
    Subscriber

    so, in conclusion: snobbery. 😉

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    You’ve got a redundant ‘s’ there, Nick.

    johnx2
    Member

    …which is better than a redundant nob. There, that’s that one done.

    Premier Icon leftyboy
    Subscriber

    Interesting debate, my grammar is average, my spelling is appalling but when I was tested at age 11 (by a phycologist) my IQ was recorded as 149 which is much higher than I feel is correct. I’m very good a puzzles and problem solving except when it involves spelling or grammar!

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    My understanding is that linguistics is part of IQ.

    Nah. I did a **** IQ test bleedin yonks ago and was in the top 5% or summink. You should hear me **** talk though. Brought up in Leigh Park does that to a mush. Though this had no adverse effect on my English Literature* O’Level grade. (A A)

    *I meant Language 😆 Age dunt arf make ya fick.

    mudshark
    Member

    High IQ kids might be worried about looking/sounding like James Harries did on Wogan some time ago.

    https://www.theguardian.com/g2/story/0,3604,472608,00.html

    GavinT
    Member

    Done good / done bad.

    Using an adjective instead of an adverb. Very common colloquially but I dislike it intensely.
    You see it all the time in statements like “Eat healthy” or “Shop local”.

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    *I meant Language Age dunt arf make ya fick.

    I think that’s why the OP is on about his grammar
    Mine died quite a long time ago; don’t know what her IQ was 🙁

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