Viewing 7 posts - 201 through 207 (of 207 total)
  • Interest Rates up again
  • piemonster
    Full Member

    look online for supply only and organise your own fitting. significant savings to be had. (I’m getting our builder to fit)

    That is the cost im looking at.

    The area in theory, is required to have traditionally built timber sash and case, including some of the absolute poorest household locally.

    What has happened more and more, is the planning process gets bypassed and people are fitting the cheapest PVC normal windows they can find (as technically, the last time I checked, they could be ordered to remove them).

    I know someone who, going by the official route would have spent £18k+, but by going in without planning and using the cheapest windows they could find, ended up at around £5k, although he was able to fit them himself.

    As far as the intentions of the conservation area go, its kind if self defeating, people either put in cheap stuff that looks cheap, or the windows are left in a dire condition. The number of households with well maintained traditional windows is an increasingly small minority. And is exactly the kind of big ticket item the poorest seemingly cant reach losing out on the long term energy savings.

    5lab
    Full Member

    replacing double glazing is possibly negative from a co2 perspective. an amazing double glazed window only saves ~£10 per year in heating costs vs a single glazed window – so lets assume some old double glazed unit saves 50% of that? £5 a year is ~70kw of gas, which is ~12kg of co2.

    The cost savings of replacing double glazing never work out (even single glazing is questionable) – I don’t know how much co2 is used in producing/fitting a new window but if its > 200kg its probably bad for the environment too..

    this paper https://glassforeurope.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/FINAL-paper-Lifecycle-carbon-calculation-double-triple-glazed-windows-May2022.pdf

    suggests 113kg per m2 of glass, so its probably a fairly close run thing

    piemonster
    Full Member

    replacing double glazing is possibly negative

    Wromg part of the equation, the examples Im thinking of arent windows being replaced because of energy saving. Theyd be replaced because theyre knackered full stop.

    5lab
    Full Member

    Theyd be replaced because theyre knackered full stop.

    thats just general house maintenance – nothing to do with energy savings or cost of living? a slightly drafty window is noticable but makes surprisingly little difference to heating costs. A window thats fallen out probably needs changing

    piemonster
    Full Member

    Well, for whatever reason that maintenance is often not happening.

    And generally not happening in the poorest areas of town.

    molgrips
    Full Member

    replacing double glazing is possibly negative from a co2 perspective. an amazing double glazed window only saves ~£10 per year in heating costs vs a single glazed window

    Hmm, that sounds a bit low but I cannot be bothered to read the study.

Viewing 7 posts - 201 through 207 (of 207 total)

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