Viewing 24 posts - 1 through 24 (of 24 total)
  • Installing Built in ovens
  • Premier Icon lovewookie
    Full Member

    Our oven went kaput a while ago and while we managed with the halogen oven and air fryer, it’s time to get a new one.
    The one that came out was fairly shallow, but the hole it came out is w60xh59.5xd57. standard as far as I know.
    Old one was wired into a round junction box which dangled at the back if it.
    If we get a standard depth oven, we’ll not have room because if the junction box.

    Should this be mounted somewhere? Not a huge amount of cable from the wall, so limited to where I could out it but it may just about go behind the adjacent cupboard, I think I can access the back of it and cut the back so I can get to the wall.

    That a good idea? Any reasons not to?

    Does there need to be a gap between the back of the oven and the wall?

    Ta

    Premier Icon aberdeenlune
    Free Member

    Should be an elephants nose (cooker cable outlet) fixed to the wall. Don’t like the sound of a dangling junction box. I’d recommend you get it done properly. Get an elephants nose installed and cabled correctly. Not sure on your dimension question but the elephants nose could be sited out of the way of the back of the oven.

    Premier Icon donald
    Free Member

    I would think any new oven will come with specifications of how much clearance is required. You should be able to find this out before comitting to buy a particular model.

    Premier Icon lovewookie
    Full Member

    I’ve just got two cables coming out of a hole in the wall!
    We’ll as our sparky about it, he’s going to be doing a few jobs for us soon anyway.

    Premier Icon Greybeard
    Full Member

    elephants nose

    Is that a type of trunking?

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
    Full Member

    ^ very good.

    Premier Icon alanl
    Free Member

    You will be fine with your existing junction box. The majority/all in built ovens are not totally flat at the back, they have plenty of room for sockets/plugs either at the top or bottom.
    The junction box has survived so far, so I wouldnt be too worried about it as it is, but it would be better with a more solid connection.

    Premier Icon chickenman
    Full Member

    An internal width of 600mm suggests that there’s not a oven housing. Most built in single ovens are made to fit inside a housing unless this is some kinda IKEA nonsense I’m unfamiliar with.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    Aye – built in are normally 57cm wide. Freestanding units for fitted kitchens are 60 cm wide

    Built in has its own cabinet that is 60 cm wide externally.

    I got caught out by this replacing our oven.

    Premier Icon lovewookie
    Full Member

    The old oven space had packing either side, internally, to space it down to about 57cm and give you something to screw the oven into. Judging by what you’re saying it looks like a cupboard unit used to house the oven.
    Is that ok though, or is there a difference in materials?
    Kitchen isn’t what you’d call designer….

    Premier Icon steveb
    Full Member

    Unlikely you’ll have a problem. Choose one, go to manu’s website and download the manual, installation section will have accurate outline drawings and show you the shape of the back of it and any clearances required.

    Premier Icon lovewookie
    Full Member

    Great, cheers.

    Premier Icon espressoal
    Free Member

    The key thing is ovens have a heavier cable, goes to a terminal behind the oven, doesn’t matter where, cable from there to oven, looks like a socket without the 3 holes for a plug, at the back of the oven there is a plate that you remove to get into the connection, SWITCH POWER OFF, then connect the cable to terminal on the back of the oven, cable should be long enough to do this then push the oven into place.

    No idea what the round thing is dangling behind the old oven, I’d bin that and nip down to B&Q and get a cooker socket and replace it in the wall.

    Premier Icon lovewookie
    Full Member

    There’s a cooker socket on the wall, as in a switch with plug socket near the oven. Below the worksurface there’s a hole in the stud wall, with two large flat grey wires, one for the induction hob, which is wired direct, and one to the round junction box.
    Something like this: https://www.screwfix.com/p/20a-4-terminal-junction-box-white/
    The Flex from the oven wires into that.

    One question that has come up. If fitting a 16A oven, or one without a plug, to a junction box, do you need an electrician?

    Ta

    Premier Icon lovewookie
    Full Member

    Think I know what you mean about cooker plate in the wall, it’s like a sunk in junction box isn’t it, but with terminals.
    I’ve not got one of those.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    16 amp – I wouldn’t bother with a sparky but I would put a proper outlet on. a junction box is not the right thing simple to do if its a stud wall

    Premier Icon lovewookie
    Full Member

    16 amp – I wouldn’t bother with a sparky

    I’m inclined not to, but wondered if, strictly speaking I should.

    I’ve got him fitting our outside power soon-ish

    Premier Icon jam-bo
    Full Member

    All my appliances on fused spurs including the cooker have clickflow connectors, means If you do have to move them it’s far easier. Can get different sizes with different ratings.

    Premier Icon bikebob
    Full Member

    As most say. Standard size built in single oven should fit no problem. Work top is mostly 60 deep and aligns with front of oven, some are deeper (bonus).
    You can wire it straight into the back. There is a cover to access the terminals, you may need to bridge some with bits supplied, instructions will say if needed. You should have a fused switch, which ideally is accessible with oven in situ, but often behind.
    If your not sure and have a sparky coming anyway, let him do it. 10 mins work.

    Premier Icon Flaperon
    Free Member

    SWITCH POWER OFF

    Goes without saying but do this at the breaker and verify that it’s actually off using a proving tool of some description. I’ve seen some crazy wiring in kitchens where the fitter has had a go at doing it themselves.

    Premier Icon cheddarchallenged
    Full Member

    If the OP buys a Neff cooker my honest advice based on a whole kitchen of Neff appliances is … save yourself a lot of time and money and chuck the whole lot out into the nearest skip before you even install them.

    Premier Icon lovewookie
    Full Member

    ^^ noted 😉

    Premier Icon midlifecrashes
    Full Member

    This thread confused me. The last couple I’ve done (in fact all I’ve owned, I’m a landlord) have all come with a three pin plug.

    e.g. https://ao.com/product/ifw6340ix-indesit-aria-electric-single-oven-stainless-steel-44645-45.aspx

    Hobs usually need wiring in to the ring main though, but some halogens now coming as 13A too.

    Premier Icon giant_scum
    Free Member

    If the new oven comes with a 3 pin plug attached, swap out that junction box for a single socket.
    You really want that flex to the oven protected with a suitable fuse i.e a 13 Amp. Otherwise it’s got the potential to take 45 Amps from the cooker switch under fault conditions.

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