Viewing 26 posts - 41 through 66 (of 66 total)
  • Innerleithen to get £19 million for MTB bikepark
  • Premier Icon sas78
    Full Member

    Trekster. You make a good point. Mabie, Kirroughtre, Dalbeattie, Glentrool Ae etc… Are all in D&G and not Scottish Borders. It’s not like D&G is a tourist Mecca that can pull crowds regardless of investment and it’s crying out for a pull factor. Would be nice to see some east west balance.

    This is a problem with all investment in Southern Scotland in that it is felt to be Borders biased. I hope that South of Scotland Enterprise might help rebalance things but that’s a big ask and too late for this sort of investment.

    It’s a great investment in Inverleithen and there will be a lot of envious bike businesses, riders and people generally in D&G who will be wondering when it will be their turn to see some investment on this scale.

    My rant over!

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    John, As do many other areas of Scotland, but it also makes sense to have a centre of excellence.

    It’s a pain in the arse for me to get to, ho hum.

    Premier Icon DickBarton
    Full Member

    I’m not sure it is as the current thinking is the centre of excellence gets everything and there is nothing left for anywhere else.
    The whole of Scotland is a centre of excellence so things should be spread around d to support a lot more than some place that hasalready had a massive slice of the pie.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    It’s chicken and egg though, innit? They need footfall to keep the businesses going that will be going into those buildings, and they have the numbers over there.

    Lots of the other stanes and the likes of laggan n glenlivet struggle to even keep a cafe going.

    Premier Icon onehundredthidiot
    Free Member

    sas78 thing is d&g feel it’s borders getting the money most of the borders south of the ettrick feel it’s the tweed valley getting the money.
    Peebles and inners are both close enough to be Edinburgh (they have EH postcodes) so they have commuters who are willing and able, and may have more clout, to campaign for projects that will make their towns better and improve facilities. After all they moved there for the access to the outdoors. Once that ball starts rolling it gathers weight and draws more in.
    I was at a borders cycling development meeting. And apart from me and a bloke from Berwick everyone else was valley. This group can access info and funds so guess where it ends up.

    Premier Icon hels
    Free Member

    I remember looking at the business case for Aim-Up (and shamelessly stealing some points to get funding from Event Scotland) and the Tweed Valley is within 90 mins drive of 3 big centres, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Newcastle – around 3 million people. It just makes sense as a location in terms of potential audience.

    Premier Icon onehundredthidiot
    Free Member

    Hels and that’s why it’s on a winner. Kirroughtree could be the best place in the world but population and transport infrastructure are always against it.

    Premier Icon hels
    Free Member

    Indeed – we even have the Borders Buses number 62 bike bus now, aimed at people coming to Glentress from Edinburgh or Galashiels/Melrose without a car. They recently announced the service has been a success and is expanding.

    Premier Icon richmtb
    Full Member

    Kirroughtree is amazing but it seems to be at least 2 hours from everywhere.

    All the Western Stanes have this disadvantage although not as bad as Kirroughtree.

    Ae at least avoids having to drive through Dumfries to get to it, but its not the most inspriring place. So it does make sense to spend the money in the Tweed Valley.

    Just don’t tell anyone about Comrie!

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Ae at least avoids having to drive through Dumfries to get to it, but its not the most inspriring place

    Last time I went to Kirro, went up Cairnsmore of fleet first, then went for a lap of the red. That was the plan anyway, I never got much further than the top of the first climb, the lunar like landscape left behind post forestry work robbed the place of it’s atmosphere, for me anyway.

    Ae is a far better place for me now, good cafe with good folks running it, and an abundance of bloody good trails all over the hill now, and cracking views from the top. Strangely, I think the deforestation will work to improve Ae, makes it much easier for the guys down there to pick lines for cutting, which they have already.

    Premier Icon bigwill
    Free Member

    I total get why they are focusing all the money on one location rather than spreading it thinly over several sites in Scotland. The tweed valley probably has the most extensive and diverse range of riding, granted there are individual places in Scotland that equal or exceed specific trail areas in the tweed valley, but collectively it has to be the top destination, particularly when you factor in accessibility.

    My only concern, and maybe a local will put me right. Is that with such large amounts of money been accessed, and with such a large proportion going on the centre and not the trail structure and facilities for riders, that those in charge are local individuals that have for a number of years worked hard to promote and drive mountain biking in the valley. Not individuals chasing the money who know how to access grant funding, pay themselves 100k+ salaries for several years to oversea the project and don’t deliver something any where near what was originally anticipated for riders who would in turn pay back into the local economy, though stays, eating etc. Probs just means being cautious and if they fall into the former I wish them every success.

    Premier Icon stevemtb
    Free Member

    I just don’t get the obsession with the chairlift/rollercoaster, the BPW model seems to work incredibly well. Why aren’t they looking to let adrenaline (or another company) expand to run a service all week still covering Innerleithen trails and adding in up to the high road point of the Golfie. Very aware it still leaves a push up to the top trails which I’ve not got an answer for but the van uplift model seems so much easier than building a dedicated mechanism to get to the top.

    Even if they ran at Inners only Monday to Thursday and then up the Golfie as well at the weekend and split out the busses across the sites. Would be a lot easier to split out the trails into different gradings too as the Golfie will be very difficult to cater for easy/blue type trails with the way it loses gradient.

    I’d also be incredibly worried about the popularity of e-bikes if spending millions on a fixed uplift, sure there will still be some wanting an uplift but there will be plenty justifying the outlay against not having to pay for uplifts…

    As above though, I genuinely do hope it is successful and will be a customer whichever way it turns out!

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    I remember looking at the business case for Aim-Up (and shamelessly stealing some points to get funding from Event Scotland) and the Tweed Valley is within 90 mins drive of 3 big centres, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Newcastle – around 3 million people. It just makes sense as a location in terms of potential audience.

    But then the argument 10 years ago was the Tweed Valley needed the investments to get it’s tourist industry of the ground. Not turn it into a commuter town for outdoorsy people.

    If the argument was to spend the money within 90 minutes drive of x million people we’d be talking about public funding for Aston Hill or a chairlift at Peaslake.

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Full Member

    If the argument was to spend the money within 90 minutes drive of x million people we’d be talking about public funding for Aston Hill or a chairlift at Peaslake.

    Do you think the Scottish Govt would stump up for those?

    The Tweed Valley is the Scottish version of the Surrey Hills anyway.

    Premier Icon seosamh77
    Full Member

    So what does a centre of excellence do exactly? It just a trumped up cafe? 😆

    Premier Icon Bewilderedsassanack
    Full Member

    I’d also be incredibly worried about the popularity of e-bikes if spending millions on a fixed uplift, sure there will still be some wanting an uplift but there will be plenty justifying the outlay against not having to pay for uplifts…

    Think you are totally correct. Been thinking this for a while. Would imagine e-DH geometry bikes are going to be pretty standard in the next few years. Outrageous geometry that can still be peddled up hill. Been bumping into packs of e-bikers in the Alps cycling uphill for last couple of years, even with the lifts running.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    just don’t get the obsession with the chairlift/rollercoaster

    Aye, adrenalin works well too, but to me vans and trailers will always seem like a bodged sticking plaster type solution, an actual fixed chairlift would give the place a feeling of a resort, something tangible, a visible reason to go there.

    The idea of going to the Nevis range always excites me more than a day on an uplift bus tbh.

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Full Member

    an actual fixed chairlift would give the place a feeling of a resort, something tangible, a visible reason to go there.

    +1

    I find van uplift a bit annoying and stop-starty.

    Turnaround time would surely be quicker on a chairlift too.

    Premier Icon stevemtb
    Free Member

    Aye, adrenalin works well too, but to me vans and trailers will always seem like a bodged sticking plaster type solution, an actual fixed chairlift would give the place a feeling of a resort, something tangible, a visible reason to go there.

    The idea of going to the Nevis range always excites me more than a day on an uplift bus tbh

    Absolutely agree with that (and the quicker turnaround point). Just can’t see how the business case could actually stack up against an improved van service. Was it not about £13m previously estimated to stick in a fixed uplift? Not sure if they’re planning something enclosed – it could be pretty grim heading up the hill soaked through in an open uplift!

    I would absolutely love a chairlift, or even better a network across the valley, but I just can’t see how it makes financial sense just for bikers.

    Genuinely do hope I’m wrong though and it helps to develop the Tweed Valley into even more of a biking resort – and hopefully not at the expense of other parts of the valley.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Also, I recall the first winter Gordo was running the uplifts, there was a hell of a lot of days the vans couldn’t get up the hill due to the ice.

    Business case would stack up with other visitors, zipwires, toboganning, bird watching, hill access for hill walking etc. Before you even talk about increase in numbers to the area, jobs etc.

    Premier Icon onehundredthidiot
    Free Member

    I dislike the vans. It causes congestion at both ends with a large group launching at pretty much the same time. And I’ve been beeped and closely passed at by a couple of vans a couple of times certainly got my adrenaline up.

    Premier Icon bowglie
    Full Member

    Might be wrong here, but wasn’t there some talk about some of the money being used to convert part of the old Innerleithen mill building into an innovation centre (for Borders College or something?).  Maybe the mixed development idea at the mill has gone out of the window in preference for housing?

    As far as the uplift goes, I was initially very sceptical about a fixed uplift, but having used van-based uplifts, I can appreciate what people have already said regarding turnaround times. I hadn’t thought about the potential for other user groups too.  I guess if it’s run on electricity from renewable sources it’s got to be more enviro-friendly than a fleet of diesel minibuses.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    To be fair to adrenaline, they are very slick and well run, I’ve never had to wait much, always a decent turnaround.

    I’d just prefer the flexibility of a ski lift type affair.

    Premier Icon bigjim
    Full Member

    So what does a centre of excellence do exactly? It just a trumped up cafe?

    gives a location for several startup companies to operate and get government funding before they go into receivership

    I dislike the vans. It causes congestion at both ends with a large group launching at pretty much the same time. And I’ve been beeped and closely passed at by a couple of vans a couple of times certainly got my adrenaline up.

    yeah I’ve had one very close fast pass with one seemingly out of control on the way down as well as the usual anooyance

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Did anyone raise a concern with Adrenaline on the incidents?. I’m pretty sure Gordo wouldn’t be too enamoured if his drivers were behaving like that.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    It shouldn’t happen, but tbh it’s not that surprising, there’s more traffic on that road than ever before (outside of races, but there’s less bikes on the road during races). This is one thing that BPW really does well, they’ve done a lot to separate bikes and vans.

    There’s a few ways to tackle it well but none of them are free. Me, I think it’d tie in well with a general “improve the uplift road”

    If nothing else it’d be a good idea to put signs up at conflict points, for both bikes and drivers. I think a lot of people just don’t expect to see vehicles at all

Viewing 26 posts - 41 through 66 (of 66 total)

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