Inability to control dogs

Home Forum Chat Forum Inability to control dogs

Viewing 40 posts - 81 through 120 (of 329 total)
  • Inability to control dogs
  • Premier Icon Harry Tuttle
    Subscriber

    “Hello Mr(s) Complete Stranger, can I have your name and address so I can report your dog as being dangerous?”

    “No.”

    “Erm…”

    I had this myself a few yeas back after being bitten (just a nip but…) when I tried to get a phone number off the coller I was approched in a way that I felt threatened physical attack. The owner then thought better and ran off. Ultimatly it was clear they wouldn’t give a name so I didn’t give chase as I had no desire to get into a fight.

    I reported the incident with a good description but got a ‘what do you expect’ type response.

    The law is pretty irrelevent until someone is seriously hurt.

    jamesfts
    Member

    Feel really sorry for the OP, we have dogs but would have no problem booting someone else’s if it was going for my daughter.

    Is it the OP’s “responsibility” to ensure that their kids are aware of how to act around dogs? Of course not. Doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a bad idea just in case something goes wrong though.

    This is a sensible approach.

    One of our terriers will occasionally growl/bark at children, for this reason he is kept on a short lead when out on walks where he may come into contact with kids. Quite often though they’ll run up to him and get in his face, trying to to stroke him (he’s small, looks cute), parents should be responsible for telling kids that this isn’t cool – luckily worst they’ll get from Cedric is his breath.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    – hit it with a cricket bat hoping you don’t miss?

    Who are all these people walking around with cricket bats? “Just popping out to the shops, love. Have you seen my bat anywhere?”

    5plusn8
    Member

    Okay, quick test for you – aggressive looking dog comes running over.
    What is the response you would have taught them?

    – Lay dead on the ground?
    – run away in a zig zag pattern?
    – hit it with a cricket bat hoping you don’t miss?

    You realise that teaching kids about dogs isn’t my solution for what to do with dangerous or unruly dogs don’t you? The solution is that legal sanction or whatever is taken against those who don’t control their dogs, and in no way is it a persons responsibility to have to learn to deal with them, but it is a good idea to learn to deal with them, don’t you agree? I grew up with dogs and since 8 or 9 years old I would stand firm and raise my voice if necessary. It is about teaching kids that they are in charge of dogs, and giving them that confidence which the dogs can detect.
    I used to ride a motorcycle and learned very quickly that to expect other road users to obey the law in order to keep me safe was an utter delusion, so I learned to give way when I didn’t have to etc etc, better to be alive and dealing with the action of those in the wrong, than to be correct and run over.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    parents should be responsible for telling kids that this isn’t cool

    It’s essentially the same problem in reverse, isn’t it. Probably with the same self-righteous entitled attitude from the parents as the dog owners.

    shadowfax
    Member

    Both those incidents as described fall under the Dangerous Dogs Act – prosecution for the owners and possible destruction of the dog.

    Shame it isn’t the other way round.

    But the dogs never do get destroyed, do they? People will bend over backwards to save dogs which in my opinion should be destroyed. The bottom line is, there are just too many of them and they are too easy to obtain.

    mrmonkfinger
    Member

    OP, hope your son is ok.

    It would be self defence to give either dog a good kick, IMO. Violent, bitey dogs should be put down and owners fined, or more.

    I say that as a dog owner, if ours ever bit someone unprovoked he would be straight to the vet.

    Premier Icon dissonance
    Subscriber

    People will bend over backwards to save dogs which in my opinion should be destroyed

    I think it is reasonable to try and save the dog. After all in most cases they will be a victim of the incompetent owner as well.
    That they arent removed from said incompetent and the owner isnt banned from owning anything larger than a hamster is more problematic.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Subscriber

    . Violent, bitey dogs should be put down and owners fined, or more.

    Last one for me was a Westie chasing me and trying to bite my foot as I pedalled along. Thankfully most of the time it’s this sort of incident rather than properly nasty. And most (if not all) of these sorts of incidents would be solved by keeping dogs on leads all the time while in public. Something that few dog owner that I know of would agree to TBH

    I don’t want to see dogs destroyed or people fined, just proper advice about controlling your dog would be a start

    kerley
    Member

    It is about teaching kids that they are in charge of dogs, and giving them that confidence which the dogs can detect.

    You are assuming that will always work (it doesn’t). What do you teach them to do when that doesn’t work?

    – Lay dead on the ground?
    – run away in a zig zag pattern?
    – hit it with a cricket bat hoping you don’t miss?

    mrmonkfinger
    Member

    I don’t want to see dogs destroyed or people fined, just proper advice about controlling your dog would be a start

    Is there not lots of proper advice about controlling your dog already?

    The problem here is that you’re wanting to advise the kind of person who isn’t going to listen to your advice thanks very much because they already know how to look after a dog.

    Jakester
    Member

    Thanks for all the positive/supportive comments. I have calmed down a touch.

    Interesting that many of the responses are more confrontational that I was. My initial instinct was to protect my lad and calm him down, and get away. I confess I hadn’t even thought about calling the police or reporting the owners until it cropped up here. Sadly, not sure it would do any good with the already stretched resources, but I take the point that doing so might at least allow for a log of incidents to be taken.

    We are going to try and introduce him to some “friendly” dogs in due course, but obviously in a managed and controlled way – not immediately though.

    As to the cricket bat point, I do play and we do have a plastic beach cricket set, but I shall add one of my old wooden bats to the set and keep it to hand…

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    My dog doesn’t attack children (fortunately) but I’ve given him a kick myself when he’s being a **** with other dogs.

    Premier Icon cb
    Subscriber

    Are muzzles really uncomfortable for dogs? Compulsory when out of the house might be a start

    anagallis_arvensis – Member
    Some right internet hard men on here!!
    LOL

    Care to explain?

    Nope you might beat me up!!

    Lots of people are morons, lots of people own dogs.
    I had one dog owner get all angry with me when my lurcher sorted out his over excited spaniel that was jumping up at my 6 year old boy! He said he would kick my dog if it attacked his again (she told off the other dog she didnt actually hurt it). Some people are plain stupid.

    My dog doesn’t attack children (fortunately) but I’ve given him a kick myself when he’s being a **** with other dogs.

    Without wanting to look like one of the aformentioned internet hard man you not the knob end who threatenned me with a fire extinguisher from his car after I told him if he kicked the dog again I was going to kick him are you?

    Premier Icon Bunnyhop
    Subscriber

    I really feel for your young boy OP.
    Most dog owners these days don’t seem to train their dogs in any way. The owners treat their dog as though it is a child or something to show off.
    If you try and explain that you are scared of dogs (which I am), I usually get the typical retorts of, “my little Fido wouldn’t harm a flea”, or “he/she is just being friendly”. I don’t want to be licked or jumped up to, thanks.
    I really believe that a dog licence should be brought back in to force.
    Comments about the child of the OP behaving in a certain way around dogs are ludicrous 🙄

    donks
    Member

    We have a maniac dog that is prone to jumping up at people and generally getting very worked up and as a result I keep her on the lead at all times now. I’m even “strongly” considering a muzzle just in case.

    She’s only small but still big enough to be intimidating and could harm if she bit.

    It’s marred dog owning for me now. We had a great hound before her that I could let off the lead without any real fear or concern that he would cause an incident and I guess we thought she would become compliant with the same amount of effort he took……. WRONG

    And now TBH I just want rid. The wife wanted the dog and said she would put the effort in but it never happened and I don’t have the time to spend training it so it’s a **** burden to me now.

    Don’t get me wrong, I believe we offered it a good home and are responsible enough owners but she is going to need a lot of work to get compliant and may not ever be the bimbling old softee that the other dog was.

    In general she’s just no fun, but that’s the risk when you get a rescue dog I guess

    Premier Icon convert
    Subscriber

    I remember being really frightened of dogs as a kid. We didn’t have one (still don’t, never had) and all my experiences with dogs were negative. Barking, snarling, jumping at you, nipping. Now I don’t get any bother. I honestly can’t recall when the change came. I never have to be outwardly aggressive to a dog but they tend to back off when I walk towards them and I’m happy with that. I’m not sure if it’s because I’m big and don’t look like a push over so they don’t start, or because of my size I have little fear of dogs so don’t look intimidated (so they in return are intimidated of me) or because at 6 foot something a barking snarling dog does not look as much of a threat as when you are less than 3 foot tall and virtually eye to eye with them. Or a bit of all the above. I did do a dog section in a survival course whilst in the forces (escape and invasion and being dug up by one, putting an arm guard on and try to run away from one, advice and tackling one coming at you) and whilst I don’t remember any of it maybe its subconsciously changed my attitude to them.

    I’m no dog fan and also no apologist for poorly behaved dogs and rubbish owners who should not be accepted but in terms of helping your own child out making them more confident around dogs does seem to make them less frightening to come across and also make the dog less aggressive in the situation.

    johndoh
    Member

    Just one point I would like to add – one of my daughters used to be very afraid of dogs when she was younger but we slowly introduced her to dogs (family and friends that have them) and she grew to love them – when she was six we got our own dog (which she wanted) and now she has gone the other way completely – not afraid to go up to pretty much any dog she sees (which isn’t necessarily a good thing I know).

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    Without wanting to look like one of the aformentioned internet hard man you not the knob end who threatenned me with a fire extinguisher from his car after I told him if he kicked the dog again I was going to kick him are you?

    Yeah that was me.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    I don’t want to be licked or jumped up to, thanks.

    And it amazes me how many people don’t get this. “Aw, he’s only playing.” Yes, but I don’t want to, and my human personal space trumps your hound’s desire to see what I taste like. If I came over there and licked your face would you dismiss that as only playing?

    I like dogs. I like most animals, in fact. But I like being left the **** alone too.

    Yeah that was me.

    😆
    You really shit bricks when I failed to back down and looked quite funny fumbling in your car boot to get the extinguisher.
    I guess all people who kick dogs (unless being attacked) are cowards at heart.

    ctk
    Member

    £1000 p/a dog license to be carried at all times.

    Feel sorry for your boy Jakester, I would have done exactly the same as you- calm him down and try de-escalate the situation.

    Premier Icon slowoldgit
    Subscriber

    I’ve walked ped Labs that were trained gundogs. They’d walk at heel all day long if so instructed. But I wasn’t ‘family’, so with me they went (singly) on a lead. Dog would be sat waiting for me by the lead hanging on a hook.

    It would seem you are not a dog person, body language could be causing them to react to you in a way you don’t want.

    But what if I’m riding along on a bike when the dog takes a dislike to me, from behind?

    pinetree
    Member

    Agree completely with you OP – really hope your boy’s ok!

    I don’t have dogs myself but was brought up in a family where we always had big dogs (parents had a Rottweiler when I was a baby) so have always been pretty confident around them myself. Last week however, I had my first experience where a dog really spooked me – in the local park with my 10-month-old son, crawling around the grass in the middle of a playing field. It’s a popular park with dog walkers, and plenty of them have their dogs off the lead, so naturally I was watching him like a hawk.
    I sh*t you not, I took my eyes off my son for 2 seconds and when I looked back a staffie/cross-breed type dog was charging at him! Fortunately he was facing the other way so didn’t see the dog and get scared and I was able to scoop him up, but the damn dog can’t have been more than a foot and a half away when I got him off the ground.
    The dog then proceeded to jump at him/us, nipping at my arms. I shouted and pushed the dog away with my foot (wearing flip-flops at the time I wasn’t really in the position to go booting away) at an animal with fairly big jaws and teeth.
    Anyway, the owner sauntered over and was able to get a lead back on the thing, saying “sorry mate, if it’s on the ground he’ll go for it”
    “So, you thought it was a good idea to bring him to a public park where kids ply and let him run around uncontrolled?”
    “ah yeah normally he’s ok”

    At which point he buggered off, telling his dog in a jovial manner “well, that was a bit naughty, wasn’t it? You can’t go charging at children, people get a bit upset” as if I’m the one in the wrong
    I’m left standing there, thinking to myself “Am I going mental? Is this how society is now, where that sort of behaviour is acceptable?” The dog might well have just been coming in to play, but if you know your dog goes for things on the ground which are smaller than it, why on earth would you bring it to a public park and let it off the lead?!?!

    I think the whole attitude is symptomatic of society as a whole. Maybe it’s getting worse or I’m just noticing it more, but people just don’t seem to give a damn about one another any more – as long as they’re ok they can just carry on doing whatever they like, without the slightest regard for anyone else. I can’t imagine acting like that, and can’t even begin to comprehend why people think it’s ok…

    Whatever the case, my boy’s fine (he didn’t even know anything had happened – as far as he’s concerned he just got picked up for a cuddle with dad) and perhaps something has changed in that dog walker, as when I saw him in the park again this weekend the dog was on a lead. If that is the case then that’s good, but sadly he’s just one of many round where I live who feel it’s acceptable to let their out of control animals do whatever the hell they want.

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    anagallis_arvensis – Member
    Nope you might beat me up!!

    😀

    Just out of interest, do either of you tend to get violent with strangers in other situations or is it something specific to dogs?
    🙂

    And exactly what Bunnyhop said.

    dudleycon93
    Member

    Im always chill xd.

    Premier Icon 2unfit2ride
    Subscriber

    Straight off the bat I will fully admit to not reading the entire thread, so forgive me if I go over old ground.

    As a dog terrier owner I can tell you that controlling the git at times is not easy, he is mostly responsive but there are times he loses the plot a bit, (he has never bitten anything but did manage to pin a cat down once or twice(in my garden)) they are…

    1, people picking up their dog/child to protect them, it sends him nuts, he will stand on his back legs yapping like terriers do.

    2, dogs that run up to his face (as apposed to his arse) he just doesn’t like it & will yap/bark & lunge at the other dog (without biting)

    So although he is mostly well behaved there are circumstances in which he can become unresponsive to recall.

    The main point I wish to make without provocation is that I see more & more parents & dog owners that are (over?) protective of their kids/mutts which makes them nervous of dogs which in turn leads to the dogs to be cautious of them, dogs have pretty high levels of sense & this can make them aggressive/protective.

    Just saying like 😳

    Edit to say I wrote that before I saw pinetree’s post.

    Premier Icon convert
    Subscriber

    1, people picking up their dog/child to protect them, it sends him nuts, he will stand on his back legs yapping like terriers do.

    So genuine question – as the owner of a dog that you know behaves like that, how would you feel if the person who picked up the child kicked him in the aforementioned nuts? And follow up questions – how many times do you think he would have to be kicked in the nuts before his learnt behaviour was to cross his legs and walk the other way? Also, as he licked the swollen gonads later that evening would you blame the kicker for over reacting, yourself for putting dog and kicker in that position by not having him under control or the dog for being a tool?

    bencooper
    Member

    (he has never bitten anything but did manage to pin a cat down once or twice(in my garden

    When a terrier-type thing ran into my garden and grabbed my cat, I had to jump on it and punch it in the head repeatedly to get it to let go. Not a fun experience.

    ctk
    Member

    I live by a beach that is open to dogs in the winter but not the summer. Someone wrote to the paper saying: “Why should I pay council tax when I can only use the beach in the winter?”
    Dog owner mindset for you right there!

    grahamt1980
    Member

    I hope i don’t have to deal with this sort of situation with my son as i am not sure if he got bitten i would react as calmly.

    Unfortunately some people are just a shites but they do seem to be the minority

    Premier Icon 2unfit2ride
    Subscriber

    people picking up their dog/child to protect them, it sends him nuts, he will stand on his back legs yapping like terriers do.
    So genuine question – as the owner of a dog that you know behaves like that, how would you feel if the person who picked up the child kicked him in the aforementioned nuts? And follow up questions – how many times do you think he would have to be kicked in the nuts before his learnt behaviour was to cross his legs and walk the other way? Also, as he licked the swollen gonads later that evening would you blame the kicker for over reacting, yourself for putting dog and kicker in that position by not having him under control or the dog for being a tool?

    TBH I was just about to delete my post as I have just read page three & I don’t like where this is going, but as you have asked a question I guess I will just have to bite the bullet & reply rather than just retreat.

    Personally I would kick my dog in the balls for you, the trouble is I would probably get done for animal cruelty, such is the world we live in, a bit like disciplining kids, you just can’t do it for fear of being reported.
    When I was a kid I wouldn’t argue with a teacher or a policeman for fear of getting a clip around the ear (or worse) but now there is no fear just a sense of superiority that says you can’t touch me.

    Ho hum.

    Edit to say I am ever watchful of whats around me when out with the mutt so I do try my best not to put my dog & myself in the sort of situation we are talking about here, but only today a dog came running at my dog from 200 yards away so you can’t always predict what’s about to happen.

    I hope i don’t have to deal with this sort of situation with my son as i am not sure if he got bitten i would react as calmly.

    I wouldnt worry too much, despite what the bed wetters on here write its very unlikely to happen. My 6 year old comes walking the dog most days so see’s lots of other dogs. We’ve had a number of numpty owners with unruly dogs but he’s never even looked like actually getting bitten.

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    Those of you saying dogs never get destroyed… they do.

    We had new neighbours move in a couple of years back. They had a mangy, mental dog that didn’t take the move well. Every time they left the house it would bark constantly until they returned. As I work from home a lot, this was driving me up the wall. I had the ban hammer waved at me for only half-jokingly starting a thread on here about the best way to kill it.

    One evening, clearly picking up on my latent hatred for it (and most dogs, to be fair) it came legging out of the house while I was cleaning my bike after a ride, and properly sank its teeth into my thigh.The ****ing thing promptly got hoofed into the middle of next week, then the neighbour comes out and says that he doesn’t understand it as thats the second time he’s done that in as many days. The previous day he’d launched a similarly unprovoked attack on a bloke just walking in the park

    Dead by the following day.

    Premier Icon 2unfit2ride
    Subscriber

    Did you bake it in a pie binners? 😯

    glasgowdan
    Member

    I’m quite fed up of the amount of dogs everywhere. Pretty much all grass park areas are not open to kids to play or adults to hang out because there are dog eggs hidden everywhere. My wee boy often has to hide behind me because someone’s dog is right in his face – under control or not, if someone’s teenage kid ran up to other little kids, sniffed their faces and ran around them inches from their face they’d get a bloody lesson in return.

    I won’t start on my thoughts on treating dogs as family…

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    I missed a trick there.

    Dead by the following day.

    Sounds like the best option all round. Lets be honest though proper attacks rather than over excited muddy mutts jumping up are rare.

Viewing 40 posts - 81 through 120 (of 329 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.