Viewing 40 posts - 81 through 120 (of 199 total)
  • Imperial measurements – when are they still used
  • Premier Icon daviek
    Subscriber

    I cant remember being taught imperial at school, maybe little bits but as soon as i started work all the journey men worked in imperial and ever since then ive always used imperial. If someone says a size in metric i sometimes do a quick conversion to imperial as it makes more sense to me

    i’m 46 and i also have a set of whitworth spanners from when i was an apprentice!

    redmex
    Member

    Polishing your Whitworths ! after they’re done it will be the King Dick !!!

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Minutes Of Angle (MOA), or 360th’s of a degree

    Wouldn’t that be seconds of angle, minutes being a 60th?

    I had to look up how many yards to the mile there were and I still can’t remember it (1240?)

    1760. That’s 22 yards in a chain, 10 chains in a furlong, 8 furlongs in a mile. Far clearer than that complicated Metric system.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    1760! Of course, silly me forgetting something so blinkin obvious 😀

    whitestone
    Member

    A chain is easy to remember – it’s the distance between the two sets of stumps on a cricket pitch 👍

    Premier Icon senor j
    Subscriber

    Pressure.
    Loads of new psi gauges where I work.
    I put psi in my tyres and around a bar and a half in my boiler!

    Do you know what they call a Royale with Cheese in the UK?

    I’d be surprised if thous had been replaced.

    When I did my machining for my HND it was all metric. I recently had cause to measure stuff in imperial on my vernier calipers and didn’t have a clue how.

    I’m surprised no one has mentioned bras

    They have metric measurements, just we don’t use them.

    I believe air rifles went metric round about the 50s to 60s. If you buy a tin of old .22 pellets they won’t fit a modern barrel. Not sure if this is to do with parity with metric 5.56mm barrels as opposed to old 5.5mm IIRC.

    Archery may have lbs per inches of draw but I bet somewhere will be using Joules.

    Nuclear is interesting, we have a reactor built 140odd feet high with a 5m thick concrete pressure vessel, water and steam travelling through imperial pipework with the seawater flow measured in gallons per minute, pressure measured in bar, tank levels in inches and reactor pressure in bar again. Stores carry metric, AF and BSW screw sizes.

    I also dismantled a fire extinguisher recently who’s hose connected to the handle using a modified Whitworth thread, the end terminated in an M12 fine thread and the rupture disc was a 1/4″ BSPP fitting.

    oldmanmtb2
    Member

    Whitworth and BSW they are different you know….

    Then we have BSF, UNF, UNC and i always order 3.6m of 2×2 at the timber merchants.

    Multi skilled me.

    Ooh a 2lb hammer…

    Number 4 6 8 10 size wood screws..

    2 ounces of nails in a brown paper twist bag please.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Archery may have lbs per inches of draw but I bet somewhere will be using Joules.

    Not Newtons?

    (It’s been a while since I was at school though…)

    Premier Icon YoKaiser
    Subscriber

    And of course with Whitworth, yer 7/8 Whit spanner won’t fit a 7/8 bolt. Something to do with making nuts smaller during the war but not changing the spanner sizes.

    Bike chains are still imperial, a tip is to measure from the centre of a pin to one 12″ away. If it comes in right on the 12 your chain is fine, if not you can gauge the wear by how far out it is. Anything over a 1/16 and you’d want to replace it.

    Premier Icon P-Jay
    Subscriber

    Wheel/tyre bead diameter on cars

    Car wheels and tyres a hotbed of Imperial v Metric nonsense.

    Wheels, Imperial diameter, Imperial width with a Metric offset.

    Tyres, Imperial diameter, metric width and a metric profile (a % of the width rather than a fraction)

    Premier Icon Twodogs
    Subscriber

    clothing…waist/leg I still work in inches, and shirt collars

    cranberry
    Member

    What we are all looking at now – screens.

    Spine deflection in archery arrows (that’s a measure of how bendy they are) – Hang a two pound weight in the middle of an arrow shaft resting on two pegs 28 inches apart. The actual deflection is most often expressed in decimals of an inch. eg 1.25 instead of 1 1/4.

    Premier Icon P-Jay
    Subscriber

    What we are all looking at now – screens.

    Only for us Muppets.

    A lot of 22″ monitors (which is pretty standard now) are actually 55cm and 24″ are 60cm. Interestingly (okay, not interestingly) when they do sell them accurately they sell them as 21.5″ not 21 1/2″.

    As for JRM, he’s a phoney anachronism, he couldn’t be less authentic if he were bought from AliExpress

    Bookmarked for future use in discussions with Pater.

    I was schooled in the early 80’s and it was all SI units and metric and on the first week of my apprenticeship we were introduced to imperial measurements!

    Forgot one: Vegetables bought by goose-stepping pensioners in Jackie White’s market in Sunderland.

    Do people still go in there?

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Spine deflection in archery arrows

    Arrow shafts also. Wooden arrows are typically 5/16″ or 11/32″ (and weighed in grains…!)

    oldmanmtb2
    Member

    Whitworth spanners are identified by the thread diameter hence a half inch whitworth spanner refers to the thread diameter and not across the flats of the head.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    #OnThisDay 1978: The British public were not impressed at the prospect of switching from miles to kilometres.

    Posted by BBC Archive on Monday, February 3, 2020

    oldmanmtb2
    Member

    Also British Association Screw Threads

    redmex
    Member

    That is a cracking clip some real characters and the motorized buggy looks just the same as the ones zippin down the high st today

    Builders merchants, “2m of 4×2 please” why use just one system of measurement 🤯

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Love that clip Cougar, especially the guy at the end that apparently thinks he fought in a war to prevent the introduction of them killimeter things.

    Vox Pops like that remind me why democracy is a terrible idea 😉

    Premier Icon lister
    Subscriber

    Canoes: feet

    Canoe paddles: cm.

    Surfboards are imperial too,

    Premier Icon tillydog
    Subscriber

    I’ll normally ask the timber merchant for a 2 inch board, at 250 millimetres wide and 2 metres long.

    To which he’ll respond: “Do you want me to cut down a 2.4?”

    The only ’round’ metric timber lengths at the local merchant are 3m (10′) and 6m (20′). All the others are metric equivalents of imperial feet: 1.8m – 6′, 2.4m – 8′, 3.6m – 12′, etc.

    richardk
    Member

    Are the distance for time trials (10 miles, 25 miles, 50 miles, etc) just a British thing?

    Marathons (running, nor chocolate bars)

    gauss1777
    Member

    I had to look up how many yards to the mile there were and I still can’t remember it (1240?) what a stupid system it was.

    There are 1760 yds to a mile*. I’m not sure it’s quite fair to call the system stupid.
    Being a child of the 60’s I am comfortable using both Imperial and Metric for most things, and favour them both for different uses.

    Most people seem to mix Imperial and Metric time quite comfortably (I think).

    * When did it become a thing not to know that?

    Premier Icon ratherbeintobago
    Subscriber

    I was schooled in the early 80’s and it was all SI units and metric

    This. And I use metric at work. I have no frame of reference for imperial measurements but I know that a litre bag of Hartmann’s is approx 1 kg.

    I don’t really understand why we didn’t complete metrication like the rest of the Commonwealth, and indeed Ireland.

    Premier Icon Scapegoat
    Subscriber

    Wouldn’t that be seconds of angle, minutes being a 60th?

    Yep, rush of blood. It’s 1/60.

    I believe air rifles went metric round about the 50s to 60s. If you buy a tin of old .22 pellets they won’t fit a modern barrel. Not sure if this is to do with parity with metric 5.56mm barrels as opposed to old 5.5mm IIRC.

    Old BSA barrels were 5.6mm in .22. Modern pellets are indeed 5.56mm, which don’t seal as well so lose power and potentially accuracy. Eley Wasps were available in both so you could choose. Just to confuse matters you can also get Air Arms pellets with different skirt measurements as some match barrels can be pellet fussy.

    paton
    Member

    ein pfund

    une livre

    Premier Icon welshfarmer
    Subscriber

    Interesting that the German Pfund is 500g or half a kilo!

    Most Hydraulic fittings on british machines are still BSP (British Standard Pipe) while stuff bought from the continent uses metric fittings. Can be a real struggle to get stuff to mix and match. Fertilizer is sold n 600 kilo bags and put down at a rate of x kgs /acre by most farmers!
    Medical needles for injections are imperial in length with diameter given as a gauge number that has no direct relationship to any sensible size, neither imperial or metric

    Premier Icon Scapegoat
    Subscriber

    Interesting that the German Pfund is 500g or half a kilo!

    Well yes, but not surprising. Before the Europeans went metric, I would imagine they needed to have comparative weights to trade in. So a German Pfund, a French Livre and an Italian Libra would be the same as an English pound.

    Interesting to know when they all went metric. ….

    oldmanmtb2
    Member

    Wire gauge…

    Premier Icon tthew
    Subscriber

    Marathons (running, nor chocolate bars)

    Now I thought that Marathons in any other part of the world were 40km long, but I could definately be wrong.

    paton
    Member

    What did the Romans ever do for us?

    pond Netherland
    pund Sweden

    lb UK

    paton
    Member

    1/2″ pitch chain

    paton
    Member

    TV screens

    paton
    Member

    6 inch nails

Viewing 40 posts - 81 through 120 (of 199 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.