Im scared to ride techy stuff since fall and operation on skull.

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  • Im scared to ride techy stuff since fall and operation on skull.
  • I’m not surprised, I’d feel the same I’m sure. Time will tell: why wouldn’t your skull bones eventually repair to be as strong as ever? And the rest is confidence which will come back.

    My friend Becky has a lot of Ti plating and bolts holding her head and face together after stoving it in in a car crash and has the same worries. she uses a chunky helmet with a chin guard and finds that helps her confidence a little bit.

    rogerthecat
    Member

    You could go completely the other way, rather than hammering down on a big full suss, get a rigid bike and ride it like trials section. Or, maybe a full face helmet may help as, surely, they make you feel invincible.

    glupton1976
    Member

    Theres nothing wrong with having a good sense of your own mortailty.

    3dvgirl
    Member

    why wouldn’t your skull bones eventually repair to be as strong as ever? And the rest is confidence which will come back.

    They removed 15mm from all round the base of my entire jaw and all the frontal bone from my brow ridge, less bone means less strength so sadly its for ever!!

    Does anyone here ride with a full face lid for trail riding.. if so which one? Not being able to do ride properly is depressing me somewhat.

    Premier Icon muddy@rseguy
    Subscriber

    Met Parachute may be the way to go helmet-wise if you feel you need more protection for your lower face or underneath your chin. The advantage of this over a “normal” full face helmet is that the chin guard is removable and it will vent a lot better so is still good for XC.

    There a lot of people on STWwho are a bit anti these but I have a few mates who use them specifically for trips to the alps.

    MoseyMTB
    Member

    Maybe book onto a skills course to help regain your confidence?

    3dvgirl
    Member

    Maybe book onto a skills course to help regain your confidence?

    would love to but blew all my money on my face…

    kudos100
    Member

    It is pretty normal to lose confidence after having a big off and breaking yourself.

    It took me about 3 months to get the confidence back to ride fast after my collar bone had healed. I smashed it to bits. Then again, I jumped back on the bike too quickly (ignoring dr’s suggestions) and re-broke it.

    It will come back, just take it easy and realise it will take time to trust yourself to push it.

    3dvgirl
    Member

    Ok, I have recently acquired a fear of riding stuff I used to ride without thinking about it. Back in february i was riding down Mt famin mad mile thing near Edale and came of big time, knocked myself out cold and broke my bike, had a bit too much confidence in my ice tyres..lol. It took me a few weeks to get the bike fixed etc due to waiting for parts, work etc.. Then at the beginning of March I had a major operation on my skull that involved shaving a load of bone of both my brow ridge and my jaw, my sinus is held together with some titanium plates. After the operation I was told strictly no riding for 12 weeks and then to remember that my skull and jaw are not as strong as they were before and that force that it could have previously withstood could now result in serious injury.

    Now i’ve been getting out again for the last few weeks but im just so scared of riding of drops and hitting stuff like i used to, its a combination of the fall, knowing my skull is weaker, and being much prettier now and not wanting to mush up my new face that cost me over 10 new xtr group sets πŸ™‚ Been riding for over 17 years and ive never felt like this. πŸ™

    maxtorque
    Member

    I think the first and most important thing is to try not to get too hung up on it! After that sort of event, it’s very very natural to not want to do it again! However, you said yourself, you have 17 years of riding experience of not smashing yourself up, so generally speaking your riding style is obviously fine!

    Accept that it’s going to take a while to find your flow, try not to push it, just relax, and you’ll find yourself riding stuff again without thinking about it. The more you tense up, and think about the obsticle coming up, the more likely you are to make a mess of things! If you are approaching the obsticle and thinking, “woah there” then just stop, get off and walk it etc, there is no shame in that.

    If possible, try to ride a lot with others, and get them to ride the tricky sections you are not sure of a few times so you can observe. Seeing someone else clear those sections will re-enforce the idea that you can do it, and at some point, you will just ride them without thinking about it!

    _tom_
    Member

    Perfectly understandable, I think the key is to just start off slow again and build up your confidence. If you can work out why you came off in the first place this helps a lot as you know your limits, what you can and can’t get away with etc! I’ve had so many crashes when I’ve thought “ok it’s only road and xc riding from now on” but you get the itch to try bigger stuff again when you’re comfortable again. Saying that I’ve never had as bad an injury as yours but I reckon the mental stuff is all pretty similar.

    I know they get talked up a lot on this forum but skills courses do help, I’m a much better and confident rider since spending a day with Tony πŸ™‚

    3dvgirl
    Member

    Saying that I’ve never had as bad an injury as yours but I reckon the mental stuff is all pretty similar.

    the crash had no part in the operation..
    i crashed because ice. πŸ™‚

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Subscriber

    I think you are being sensible.

    Just take your time. Perhaps change your focus more towards expedition style riding.

    Skills courses are well and good, but get it wrong just once and you may face permanent consequences.

    The greatest skill is recognising your vulnerability and riding accordingly.

    TiRed
    Member

    Met Parachute – risk compensation is a real effect, and it’s exactly what you are in need of. A full face helmet would also work, but I bet the weight and lack of ventilation would be too much and stop you riding even more.

    I broke my collar bone and was very cautious afterwards. A heavy fall onto the same shoulder on first off road ride confirmed that I didn’t need to worry unduly. My wheels still stay pretty close to the ground though πŸ˜‰

    I hadn’t been doing ‘modern’ technical MTBing for long when I had a freak accident in the ice and really messed up my ankle – just lost the bike from under me on a gentle bridleway heading uphill at moderate speed but the ankle will never regain full mobility. I was already a pretty risk averse rider anyway! So my key things then have been:

    1. Really working hard on my technique
    2. Always dropping my seat for pretty much anything other than straightforward pedalling, be it uphill or downhill.
    3. Riding flats so I can get away from the bike easily.
    4. Only riding things I can visualise myself riding correctly.
    5. Trying to ride with a margin of error that’s appropriate to the conditions – i.e. more randomness happens when it’s just rained after a dry spell and my local singletrack is is tacky on the dirt but lethal on some of the roots.

    I don’t tend to wear pads, partly because I haven’t found any comfy ones but mostly because there’s no armour out there that would protect my ankles from a similar break. I don’t focus on not crashing because that’s a negative mindset but I do focus on getting from A to B to C etc with the bike and I in perfect harmony (even if I rarely achieve it!)

    In your scenario, I’d have a look at some of the enduro style full-face helmets out there, and just wear a bit less on your core and legs to stop you overheating. Whatever helps you ride confidently and protects the critical parts when it does go wrong.

    glupton1976
    Member

    Is this a troll?

    Is this a troll?

    Seriously?! Some people…

    Premier Icon Clover
    Subscriber

    After reading (and refreshing) a couple of times it dawned on me that the OP has paid a lot of money to have her facial structure altered and now fear of stacking it onto the expensive new titanium bits is affecting her approach to riding.

    Please tell me I’ve got it all wrong? It’s made me very sad.

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    We don’t know why the OP had such an operation so let’s not jump to the conclusion it was anything other than a medical reason.

    transmute
    Member

    And even if it wasn’t it’s not really the point is it?
    It’s more about regaining your riding grrr after a big and painful off. The OP just has had an extra reason in the meantime to add to the list of reasons that they don’t want to stack it big time again.
    I suspect just working up to more techy stuff and not being afraid to get off and walk the eek bits until you feel ready will be the best approach. With maybe a little shopping therapy for a lid that will protect the new weight saving internal upgrades! πŸ™‚

    Edric 64
    Member

    I`m guessing that as the OP has titanium bits holding her face together this was some form of correctional surgery rather than just vain cosmetic surgery?

    Premier Icon Moe
    Subscriber

    ….the new weight saving internal upgrades!

    Oh good grief, now you’ll give the weight weenies ideas! πŸ˜‰

    3dvgirl
    Member

    I`m guessing that as the OP has titanium bits holding her face together this was some form of correctional surgery rather than just vain cosmetic surgery?

    thats the one… πŸ™‚

    Premier Icon martinhutch
    Subscriber

    Anyone who thinks that surgery involving bone-shaving and titanium reconstruction (leading to permanent weaking of the underlying structure) could possibly undertaken as a cosmetic frippery is very odd indeed.

    It’s only been a few weeks since your riding ban was lifted, OP – how could you feel anything apart from nervous and cautious about anything that could lead to an impact? If you’re still feeling freaked out about it in a couple of months time (or even if you’re not), why not chat to your surgeon on a follow-up appointment about what he/she thinks is reasonable given their experience of earlier cases?

    Premier Icon Moe
    Subscriber

    Just ride and enjoy riding for the sake of it, don’t beat yourself up over it and then just do what feels comfortable. Maybe then a skills course, then step up a little.

    Jedi would get in your head too, which is a huge confidence builder!

    Bit by bit, these things come back to you. I’ve been through a couple of confidence knocking injuries, and it can be quite depressing. Reading this reminded me that 3 years ago I was terrified of hitting anything off camber at any kind of speed after faceplanting badly enough to break my hooter in 2 places.

    Really affected me for a while but I realised while reading this that I don’t even think about it anymore.

    Premier Icon Clover
    Subscriber

    being much prettier now and not wanting to mush up my new face that cost me over 10 new xtr group sets

    Tbh if OP hadn’t said she’d paid for it it wouldn’t have rung such alarm bells. I work in fashion and see people do eye-bogglingly self-destructive things for appearances’ sake and it upsets me. So forgive me if this wasn’t the case.

    Anyway, healing – wherever – takes a lot of your physical resources. Although it’s not your arms or legs that are healing you should still build up to stuff you would have done gradually. And you will become more cavalier with yourself in general (like when it is all fine the next time you hit your head on a desk emptying the bin and you realise that you’re stronger than you think).

    Oh and surgeons are usually terribly proud of their handiwork and will tell you not to spoil it by doing anything rash (you will anyway, we all do that terrible, injurious thing called age).

    Junkyard
    Member

    we all suffer after a crash and there are thre approaches
    1Conquer your fear ASAP and just ride as you used to
    2. Build it up slowly
    3. Ride totally different stuff due to the penalty for failure

    I do a mixture of all three

    Perhaps get a big back pack and have a Full face helmet in it for the downhill gnar?

    Premier Icon oldfart
    Subscriber

    I know exactly where you are coming from . 2 crushed vertebrae in my spine followed by a diagnosis of Osteoporosis and the specialist telling me never to ride off road again . After consulting my GP he told me to carry on but just be careful . So I did a season in Whistler ! But you should have seen how I rode though ! Then after coming home unscathed I started to wonder if I should have pushed myself more! πŸ™„
    Since then my wife has broken her wrist then a year later her Tibia ! Latter eventually needing a replacement knee ! Having 1st hand experience of the impact its had on her riding it certainly makes not want to find out what happens if I break a bone
    Ranks high in the book of excuses ! Could have rode that if it wasn’t for etc etc ! My mate keeps telling me better to be able to ride and enjoy flown Singletrack with contact to the ground than try and be clever and end up not being able to ride at all and he makes a valid point.

    3dvgirl
    Member

    lol i love the debate on my medical condition.. ill just have to leave you guessing.

    But anyway thanks for the nice advice i think ill just take my time, get a new full face lid and see how things all go.

    CountZero
    Member

    I came off my bike riding into town, turned off of a hill onto a shared path, at about walking speed, and both wheels went sideways, dumping me hard onto the Tarmac. Hit my left knee, shoulder and the side of my face. Fortunately I had a helmet on, as the peak caught a lot of the impact, but my left knee has never felt right, it creaks loudly going up and down stairs, and aches continually some days. As a result, my confidence on the bike has been completely shattered, I feel I can no longer trust my tyres to grip, and stop me coming off again.
    I can whole-heartedly relate to the OP; my problem is very much less significant than hers, but it’s the nagging worry that another off will cause significant and long-lasting damage that may be mobility restricting.
    To the OP, good luck, whatever your reasons for having pretty invasive surgery, they are obviously very important to you, and I hope that you can regain some of your lost confidence. πŸ˜€

    3dvgirl
    Member

    To the OP, good luck, whatever your reasons for having pretty invasive surgery, they are obviously very important to you, and I hope that you can regain some of your lost confidence.

    Its odd because i’ve gain so much confidence in normal everyday life since the op, but i’ve lost it on the bike…

    fr0sty125
    Member

    I think you have every right to be nervous, my suggestion would be try a full face.

    CountZero
    Member

    Its odd because i’ve gain so much confidence in normal everyday life since the op, but i’ve lost it on the bike…

    Not that odd, really. I’m not trained as a psychologist, but I can totally understand why you should think like that. The surgery has changed physical characteristics that made you much less confident in public situations, but the surgery has lead to you physically being more vulnerable to injury if your riding causes you to have an accident, thus threatening the positive results of the surgery. It’s a feedback loop. Simples! πŸ˜€
    Just ride, but take more care riding, and pay more attention to the scenery, rather than ragging it. πŸ˜€

    3dvgirl
    Member

    the surgery has lead to you physically being more vulnerable to injury if your riding causes you to have an accident, thus threatening the positive results of the surgery.

    yep that’s what goes through my mind.. Its really quite disconcerting.

    Premier Icon JoeG
    Subscriber

    Casco Viper is similar to the MET Parachute, but the chinguard is supposedly more substantial. It is removable as well.

    bigrich
    Member

    I snapped my scapula, now I’m much more wary. taken 12 months to feel like I’m getting my mojo back.

    just ride what are can – maybe see it as an opportunity to explore more scenic or urban routes. Might be worth looking at the sustrans site.

    No doubt given time confidence will come back. ime.

    3dvgirl
    Member

    Casco Viper is similar to the MET Parachute, but the chinguard is supposedly more substantial. It is removable as wel

    do either of them meet Downhill lid standards?

    K
    Member

    The Viper and Parachute are no where near DH standard of helmet. I’ve had a couple Parachutes and a Switchblade before them.

    I ride with a MET parachute all the time unless it is going to be a purely gravity day. IMO it offers more protection than a normal helmet (if its a massive crash then I don’t think it would fair well, but I think it offers enough to warrant wearing it.

    I wouldn’t mind trying an Urge Archi, though it looks a bit too much for normal riding.

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