Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 55 total)
  • I’m doing my CBT (motorbike) tomorrow….
  • Premier Icon spot1978
    Free Member

    Really looking forward to getting my full license so I can join mates on local trips and eventually holidays aboard. Not too interested in fast bikes (at the moment) but a 250-400 do it all bike seems to fit the bill.

    Any tips for the CBT from any motor bike riders on STW? I roughly know what is involved and have borrowed some kit to make it safer.

    I guess the main thing is just getting used to the controls to begin with.

    Premier Icon sharkattack
    Free Member

    Good luck and just enjoy it. It’s very straightforward and you’d have to do something seriously wrong to fail. You’ll have some time to learn the controls before you hit the road. If you can drive and ride a bike it should come to you pretty easily.

    I passed my test in November and unbelievably I didn’t run out and buy a bike immediately. I’m also not interested sports bikes but I live near a Royal Enfield dealer and the Meteor looks like a nice, lazy cruiser. Insurance is the big killer for a new rider, I’ve had some outrageous quotes for pretty average bikes.

    Where are you doing it? I did all my riding in Rotherham and I swore I’ll never visit the place ever again.

    Premier Icon GeForceJunky
    Full Member

    You are normally given the option of using a twist and go moped or a geared 125. If your not already a motor biker, choose the moped!

    Premier Icon teaandbiscuits
    Free Member

    Does that mean you can pass on an auto moped then ride a geared 125 straight away?

    Premier Icon poolman
    Free Member

    CBT is easy, on mine someone pulled a wheely and fell off tho, he clearly hadn’t practiced.

    Good luck

    Premier Icon boxwithawindow
    Full Member

    Definitely dont choose the moped, its compulsory basic TRAINING for a reason, so they can train you how to ride a motorcycle.

    Riding a 125 geared bike is the easiest thing in the world just go and have fun, I dont know anyone who hasn’t passed on the say and I know people who fell off twice.

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Full Member

    I did mine before it was even called the CBT. Part one, back then.

    Just enjoy riding the bike. Take a few moments to set yourself up and breathe.

    Premier Icon sharkbait
    Free Member

    Did mine a few years ago – great fun.
    One interesting thing was that apparently a 125 needs to be revved whilst slipping the clutch when doing low speed manoeuvres.

    Remember to do a lifesaver before doing almost anything and ride in a dominant position on the road.
    (there’s probably more but those were my takeaways!)

    Premier Icon spot1978
    Free Member

    Thanks guys,

    I’m doing the test in Thatcham (Berkshire) so it should be pretty quite. I will have to sell one of my MTB’s to afford to buy one though…..not sure how that will go down!

    I’ve never ridden a motorbike before, so defo most concerned about the controls. But I guess you let the clutch out and twist sloooooowly!!! Not just rip it.

    Premier Icon sobriety
    Free Member

    I’ve never ridden a motorbike before, so defo most concerned about the controls. But I guess you let the clutch out and twist sloooooowly!!! Not just rip it.

    Actually you rev it as much as you like and let the clutch out really slowly to slip it.

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Full Member

    Try not to do this.

    Premier Icon pondo
    Full Member

    You are normally given the option of using a twist and go moped or a geared 125. If your not already a motor biker, choose the moped!

    F*** that! 🙂

    Listen and learn, I’d say. 🙂 Did a couple, years ago now, but a really enjoyable and educational day on someone else’s bike. 🙂

    Premier Icon spot1978
    Free Member

    No video evidence will be provided.

    Premier Icon sharkattack
    Free Member

    But I guess you let the clutch out and twist sloooooowly!!! Not just rip it.

    Sorry to break it to you, but it’s a 125. Ripping it makes no difference!

    It’s still possible to completely spanner yourself though. Just do everything slowly and smoothly.

    I remember mine was a nice day out. I hadn’t ridden a bike before so I had a silly grin on my face while cruising along in the sun.

    Premier Icon euain
    Full Member

    It’s training as well – not a test. So go, enjoy and learn.

    It’s the trainer’s job to make sure you learn everything you need – just concentrate and learn a new skill.

    Premier Icon bigyan
    Free Member

    Just relax and enjoy the day.

    You slip the clutch for low speed maneuvering which is weird and seems wrong at first. You can just hold the revs at say 3k, and just slip the clutch more or less to speed up or slow down at walking pace.

    Easier to balance at low speeds than a bicycle. If you relax and ride it like a bicycle (look where you want to go) its easy. Try not to over think it.

    Premier Icon anagallis_arvensis
    Free Member

    I disagree about a 125cc being the easiest thing in the world to ride. I found after my CBT doing the proper test on the bigger bike that the bigger bike was much easier to ride than the hateful little 125… If you are local to Thatcham give us a shout when you have a bike!!

    Premier Icon thepodge
    Free Member

    sharkattack
    Where are you doing it? I did all my riding in Rotherham and I swore I’ll never visit the place ever again.

    Me too although pushing 20 years ago now & I already knew to avoid the place back then. Sheffield isn’t brilliant but Rotherham really suffers from being the poorer neighbour.

    On my CBT my clutch control was rubbish so they got me to clear up the cones at the end of the session by riding up, kicking them over, hooking them on my foot and scooping them back to the storage hut. Brilliant way to fine tune my skills.

    Haven’t ridden a motorbike in 5 or more years now, would love another but cost & storage says no, shame there isn’t more hire places about, I’d have one every other weekend for a Sunday razz in the Peak.

    Premier Icon sharkbait
    Free Member

    I found after my CBT doing the proper test on the bigger bike that the bigger bike was much easier to ride than the hateful little 125…

    This is what my trainer was telling me when we were doing the cones bit.
    I must have not looked convinced so he threw me the keys to a CB500X and told me to ride it around – it was very much easier in probably every respect (other than picking up I guess).

    Premier Icon hot_fiat
    Full Member

    Use the 125s. They will have the worst brakes, the worst suspension and worst clutches of any bike you’ll ever ride. They’re deliberately like that – a sort of mechanical filter for the inept. Your challenge is to ride it. The idea is if you can ride one of those you can ride anything you might thereafter go out and purhcase for £50 off marketplace and hopefully not render yourself into a kidney donor too quickly.

    If you really don’t get on with the normal 125s, they will almost certainly have a gem of a 125 varadero (yes honda did actually make a V-twin 125cc varadero!) out the back for those that don’t fit their usual intake of scrots and who they can see potential in to go on to make motorcyclists on “good” machines. It’ll have proper brakes, a non-random clutch and an engine with actual torque. It will be grey.

    Go gently – gentle throttle, gentle clutch, gentle brakes and steering. Look EVERYWHERE – possibly read up about headchecks now. Both brakes are for slowing down, but only the back brake is for stopping! Slip the clutch all you like – it’s sloshing around in a bucket of oil, you can basically treat it like an adjustable fluid coupling.

    Being taught to ride was one of the stand out best things I’ve ever done. Enjoy it.

    Premier Icon sharkattack
    Free Member

    Me too although pushing 20 years ago now & I already knew to avoid the place back then. Sheffield isn’t brilliant but Rotherham really suffers from being the poorer neighbour.

    There are parts of Rotherham where there are giant waves in the tarmac, like the breaking bumps you seen on the trails in Les Gets. Usually when you’re leaning over on a roundabout.

    Throw in the bumper to bumper traffic and all the young scrotes in their 300bhp PCP machines trying to drag race everyone and yes, it was an interesting place to do a load of lessons and then a Mod 2.

    Sheffield isn’t much better in terms of traffic and horrible driving which is part of the reason I don’t have a bike yet.

    Premier Icon darthpunk
    Free Member

    Did my CBT last year and had a ball even though the one of the other two fellas, who were just there so they could ride for Deliveroo, nearly took me out in a petrol station. He also kept going off on his own little jaunts and peeping at every car on the road……..he was politely invited back for more training on another day

    It took me two days to wipe the smile from my face, much to the disgust of my non-bike-loving wife.

    Plans pretty much the same as the OP, something for going on little adventures, nothing Ducati’ish in my future but I hope to start going for the rest of the license in the next few months……..don’t want to have to go through the theory test again, that was murder .

    Just enjoy it is my advice, It’ll go all to quickly, if you’re anything like me you’ll roll the throttle a few times making an arse of gearchanges because your old brain is thinking too hard about it.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Full Member

    As others have said,

    The T in CBT is Training not Test (and the B is Basic). They’ll teach you the answers to all the questions you’re asking right now. How to make it go, how to make it stop, how to make it turn, how to pick it back up when you’ve dropped it on the floor.

    It’s not something you can fail. If you are truly dreadful – and if you’re already a cyclist and not a complete gimp then you won’t be – then you’ll be invited back for extra practice.

    This notion some folk have discussed of choosing between a bike and a moped is weird to me. Unless it’s changed radically since I did it, the only people on mopeds were 16-year old scallies who were going to buy mopeds. You’re learning to ride a bike so having lessons on a bike shouldn’t be rocket surgery.

    Relax, have fun. Worst case scenario, if you decide it’s not for you after all, you’ve had an experience day.

    Premier Icon Bikingcatastrophe
    Free Member

    It’s a fun day although not as much riding as you would hope. There’s a lot of theory they go through on the day but it’s mostly focused around safety. 125s are an absolute hoot to ride around on so you should have a great day. Most of the day will be in the car park but the final evaluation part will be out on the road. I seem to recall we had about an hour and half riding out on the roads. Most memorable part of my CBT was the rather loud crashing noise as a female ride was getting some one-to-one training with an instructor and she dropped it. More than once. I wouldn’t be surprised if she was still getting lessons….

    Also, your CBT is only good for 2 years. I would make sure you are also cracking on with your theory test as you will need that before you can get your full license.

    Premier Icon GlennQuagmire
    Free Member

    Both brakes are for slowing down, but only the back brake is for stopping!

    Not sure I follow that. If you need to stop, then progressive front braking is what’s needed. The back brake is next to useless as the weight shifts forwards.

    A tip for slow speed riding (i.e. riding in heavy traffic). Keep the throttle steady (not too high) – ditto with the clutch (keep it slipping but steady) and just use the rear brake to control the speed.

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Full Member

    I’ve not used my back brake in 20+ years apart from when sitting at traffic lights.

    Premier Icon blokeuptheroad
    Full Member

    Not sure I follow that. If you need to stop, then progressive front braking is what’s needed. The back brake is next to useless as the weight shifts forwards.

    I sort of agree, the front brake is by far the most effective at quickly scrubbing speed and is the main one to use.  But I also understand (I think) the poster you quoted.  When coming to a smooth controlled stop, it is sometimes better to do most of your slowing down with the front brake, but for the last few feet ease off with the front and actually stop with the rear.  This avoids excessive fork dive and makes for a much more composed and smoother stop.  If you haven’t tried it, give it a go.  I’d ridden for years before I learned this but now do it all the time. It looks much better too.

    Premier Icon GlennQuagmire
    Free Member

    Ah okay, that makes sense then – perhaps I misunderstood the post then (likely!).

    And yeah, for a controlled stop I do try and ease off the front brake then switch to the rear when waiting at lights, etc.

    Premier Icon hot_fiat
    Full Member

    That’s exactly what I meant. You take real speed off with both, but unless you’re doing an emergency stop, you feed in more and more back brake as you get to walking pace, pulling up with 0% front brake.

    Premier Icon anagallis_arvensis
    Free Member

    Premier Icon Quigon-Jim
    Full Member

    Hello, I’ve been an instructor since 2008, teaching CBT, DAS and keeping the SERV blood riders current. The best advice I can give is just relax, listen and don’t be hard on yourself if you struggle; the syllabus has a lot to cover in a day! You can do the day on either bike (manual or auto) but I’d always say try the manual first.
    Its terrific fun, have a great day!

    Premier Icon cheekysprocket
    Full Member

    So how’d it go?! Hope you enjoyed it. Mine a few years ago was one of the nicest days out ever. I just remember riding along up out of Rossendale in glorious sunshine, on a clapped out old Honda CG 125, buzzing along looking out across to the Dales, and feeling so damn chuffed to be actually riding a motorbike. Mint. Hope it’s the same for you.

    Premier Icon SSS
    Free Member

    It’s like a cycling proficiency test. But on an engined bicycle.
    (Having said that I never did one 🙂 )

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    I did DAS years ago, don’t recall that involving a separate CBT bit at the start, but was 20 years ago….

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Full Member

    I did DAS also and I definitely needed the CBT first, that would’ve been early- to mid-2000s too. I still have the cert somewhere. You needed to complete CBT before you could start on DAS (or any other training programme), it was a separate thing.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    OK, mine was mid 90s. Pretty sure it was all rolled into one only ever recall using a Honda 500 at the centre.

    There was no theory test either whole thing was 4.5 days, just rock up for 4 days on a 500 and on the am of the 5th day you sit ride your test.

    Premier Icon leffeboy
    Full Member

    what an excellent idea.  Hope your test went well

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Full Member

    Come on OP. We need to know.

    Premier Icon joshvegas
    Free Member

    he’ll be out robbing many a man to get his vincent machine, then make his way to cafes to pick up a girl with red hair in black leather.

    Premier Icon Murray
    Full Member

    OK, mine was mid 90s.

    Youngster. I did my bike test in 1981. Turned up wearing Belstaff, dayglo Sam Browne, L-plates properly fixed to the bike. A couple of times round the block whilst the examiner stood on the corner, emergency stop when the examiner raised his clipboard. Read the number plate on a car in the car park, answer pointless question about stopping distances and all done.

    Those were the days!

    I hope the OP was as successful despite having to work for it.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 55 total)

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