idiots that bring nothing to the forum

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  • idiots that bring nothing to the forum
  • Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    How very dare you!
    Dangled prepositions are all the rage these days darling.

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwaEPTSRcSw[/video]
    Take that!
    I hope you’ve learned a very valuble lesson there………..

    Some of us are even more than happy to split infinitives all day long.

    Get with the program(me) granddad.

    Regards,
    Tony Wendice.

    Jamie
    Member

    Too much, too soon – even Or was that part of the easing in?!?

    You missed the were/we’re…

    dannyh
    Member

    This is a largely informal place. As such, ‘conversational’ language and grammar is appropriate. So long as you’re understood, then it really isn’t a big issue. If, however, you are trying to convey a particular meaning and balls it up by poor grammar or spelling, then you really should be happy to be picked up on it. You then have the chance to realise your mistake and correct any misunderstanding you may have caused. This is just life. People who bite at the slightest bit of correction from others are just as bad as the true pedants. If you don’t like being corrected, then be meticulous.

    I have been known to pick people up on grammar or spelling on here. I must confess, often it is out of a desire to kick the chair out from under someone who is ‘giving it the big’un’ on a topic and doesn’t like being questioned on anything.

    Anyway, don’t lose any sleep over it. It is far more important not to be part of a bullying clique or a lone-wolf tosser than to make sure every apostrophe is necessary.

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    I have NEVER done anything of the kind to a wolf, or any other creature.

    The pictures were faked.

    Yours etc,
    George Fortescue Maximilian de Winter.

    nealglover
    Member

    Grammer police are bellends!

    Grammar

    Premier Icon bearnecessities
    Subscriber

    If, however,

    Overuse use of comma. Good post otherwise. 😉

    Premier Icon JoeG
    Subscriber
    slowoldgit
    Member

    Hey, danny – language and grammer ARE, alternatively it might read better if you add a ‘use of’ in front.

    I’m sorry for the person who might do a search for ‘breaks’ when he needs advice on stoppers.

    Premier Icon teamhurtmore
    Subscriber

    nealglover – Member
    Grammer police are bellends!
    Grammar

    😀 From the OP onwards it’s hard to know what is and what isn’t intentional on here. But that is one of the best so far!

    Jamie
    Member

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wdqbi66oNuI[/video]

    antigee
    Member

    everybody brings something even if a it’s only a better understanding of idiocy – occasionally felt disgruntled by being personally attacked for a particular viewpoint but then again you can avoid those threads

    – as to junk in threads looking for help dumb stuff just bumps them up back into the visible so helps get a useful answer

    – sometimes the MTFU / willy waving responses people sometimes get if operating below elite levels and ask a what gear ratio / fitness / running / hydration etc question don’t appear that useful – but its the internet

    as to grammar and spelling I’d rather not read stuff that’s been copied and pasted from pinkbike but that’s me I prefer a bike with brakes that doesn’t break

    roper
    Member

    For those of you with high literacy skills, who also seem to lack basic social skills,

    “Dyslexia is a specific learning difficulty that affects auditory memory and processing speed which impacts on literacy development, mathematics, memory, organisation and sequencing skills to varying degrees. Dyslexia can occur at any level of intellectual development. It is neurological in origin and is seen to run in families. It affects up to 10% of the UK population at some level and can affect anyone of any age and background.

    Background

    Dyslexia is a subject that has caused much debate over the years. The first descriptions – from over a hundred years ago – used the term ‘word blindness’, reflecting the view that difficulties in reading were caused by problems in visual perception. It was not until the 1970s that the role of language processing was recognised and only in the last 20 years has that been accepted as the primary feature of dyslexia.

    While controversy and debate continued, it was easier for some in professional practice to ignore the issue and harder to argue for specific approaches and methods. Instead, those living with dyslexia were often wrongly labelled as ‘slow’, ‘thick’ and/or ‘lazy’, with school reports warning parents not to expect much from their son/daughter!

    Controversy also led to alternative treatments and ‘miracle cures’. If mainstream services have nothing to offer, it is no surprise that people will turn to alternatives. Almost always, these alternatives are untested and often based on unsubstantiated claims.

    Recognised under the Disability Discrimination Act

    Dyslexia was recognised under the Disability Discrimination Act in 1995 and is still specifically mentioned in the more recent Equality Act (2010). This means that educational and workplace settings have a duty to make reasonable adjustments to ensure that those affected by dyslexia are not disadvantaged compared to their peers.

    Dyslexia became recognised as a Special Educational Need (SEN) and was mentioned as an example in the 1997 Code of Practice.”
    http://dyslexiaaction.org.uk/

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    This is a largely informal place. As such, ‘conversational’ language and grammar is appropriate.

    There’s a difference between “conversational” and “wrong” though, and if people know that they’re using the incorrect form of a word, but do so in the name of being ‘conversational’ they’re even more idiotic than people who correct them!

    For those of you with high literacy skills, who also seem to lack basic social skills,

    Just read all of that, and I’m afraid I still think “I’m dyslexic” is used as a catch all for any form of inability to write properly. From reading all of that I don’t see how saying “should of” or “your going to have to do something” (both of which are common, and personally I find infuriating) is anything to do with dyslexia, it’s either laziness or poor education.

    My coat? That black one, thank you.

    slowoldgit
    Member

    OK, I’m dyslexic and so is my brother. He has it worse but, in compensation, has an amazing skill at thinking in 3D. We were both spotted in Primary School and given the help that we needed, half a century ago. You know, classes of 35 and that. I still have to be careful with numbers, always checking what I write down. I got away with it throughout a career in engineering.

    Does this still happen in Primary Schools, or are dyslexic children left un-noticed?

    nealglover
    Member

    Does this still happen in Primary Schools, or are dyslexic children left un-noticed?

    My OH is a primary teacher.

    Dyslexia is rapidly spotted these days.

    Probably because any parent of a child who can’t spell very well, blames dyslexia as a first option.

    Premier Icon somouk
    Subscriber

    It appears I’m wading in to this a little late without reading several pages of thread but catching the end. Surely someone who is dyslexic and knows that they are would introduce a coping strategy as simple as having a spell checking in their browser?

    My Google Chrome browser checks my posts as I type… Would that not be simple enough?

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    I have a spell check in my broswer because I’m a rubbish tryper and arent terribly good at proof reading what I wreit wo use the red underlines to pick up where I’ve gone wrong.

    I recognise that I have a porblem and have a strategy for dealing with it.

    If I were dyslexic I’d do somethign simialr. IT doesn’t mean it’s ritght ot ‘pick’ on someone for having dyslexia biut there are all sorts of reasons why people’s posts on here are challenginf to read.

    An lot of what gets picked up on here is poor english, not bad spellign anyway.

    pewople increasingly tend to type the way they speak which, imo, isn;’t good practice as the spoken workd has different nuances and intoantions which can be used to underastnad meaning where the written word has to stand on it’s own.

    (the above is as I typed it, notrmally with my posts I go back over what I’ve written adn coreect ebvrything. On this occasion ‘ve let it stand as written).

    [really, the above is how it came out of my fingers, I’ve not embellished it at all]

    My OH is a primary teacher.

    Dyslexia is rapidly spotted these days.

    +1

    Morning! Still here?

    ianv
    Member

    There’s a difference between “conversational” and “wrong” though, and if people know that they’re using the incorrect form of a word, but do so in the name of being ‘conversational’ they’re even more idiotic than people who correct them!

    How do you manage when you are abroad and not 100% fluent in the particular language? Keep quiet or just shout loudly in your perfect English?

    Some people might communicate differently to you for all sorts of reasons, to label them as lazy or stupid without the context is equally lazy and stupid (and snobbish).

    roper
    Member

    Nje200 There are enough tests now to be able to test if someone has dyslexia or is being “lazy”. Perhaps you could have a look at the link I provided to get a better understanding of the differences.

    I think a good explanation of dyslexia is it is a bit like a second language, first language being visual. There are many Coping practices I use, spell checker (qite a few times per paragraph) and asking someone else to read what I have written. These all take extra effort or time, sometimes getting in the way of expressing thoughts of ideas. Despite best efforts there will still be some mistakes. I agree that the written word should not always be like the spoken, though there is place for both. One of the reasons I posted the info was because some of the posts on this thread have gone past human error helpfulness and have become either indifferent or bullying.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Most people I’ve spent time with using English as their second language have asked me to correct their English wherever possible so that they can learn.

    It led to many interesting and quite long conversations about linguistics with some of my Finnish colleagues 🙂

    nealglover
    Member

    some of the posts on this thread have gone past human error helpfulness and have become either indifferent or bullying.

    Which ones ?

    andypaul99
    Member

    Just read all of that, and I’m afraid I still think “I’m dyslexic” is used as a catch all for any form of inability to write properly. From reading all of that I don’t see how saying “should of” or “your going to have to do something” (both of which are common, and personally I find infuriating) is anything to do with dyslexia, it’s either laziness or poor education.

    Come again?

    roper
    Member

    Most people I’ve spent time with using English as their second language have asked me to correct their English wherever possible so that they can learn.

    I agree to a point but if you do it publicly and too much then you will find they tend to say less or express themselves more simply which is counter productive. Its also important that you mention they have asked first.

    deadlydarcy
    Member

    If you’re the type that spent Iong evenings holed up in your room as a child instead of out learning important social skills for later life, such as knowing when it’s appropriate to correct someone’s grammar, spelling etc. or not, then welcome! You’ll be amongst friends here.

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    How do you manage when you are abroad and not 100% fluent in the particular language? Keep quiet or just shout loudly in your perfect English?

    How’s that relevant? I’d gladly be corrected if I made a blatant howler in a foreign language.

    Some people might communicate differently to you for all sorts of reasons, to label them as lazy or stupid without the context is equally lazy and stupid (and snobbish).

    Where have I done either?

    Come again?

    There are two examples of common, blatant grammatical errors in there. How is that related to dyslexia? Serious question. I think people just trot out “I’m dyslexic” for not knowing the correct word. I know it’s an awful condition, as roper’s link and posts show (and roper – I wasn’t detracting from that), just that it’s overused as a diagnosis.

    I think people just trot out “I’m dyslexic” for not knowing the correct word. I know it’s an awful condition, as roper’s link and posts show (and roper – I wasn’t detracting from that), just that it’s overused as a diagnosis.

    Agreed in full. Mrs CFH is very dyslexic, if there can be such a thing. When stressed, she could spell “cat” as “pxxlhyyupnnsayyflxxssqq” and it would make perfect sense to her. She knows the difference between “should have” and “should of”, however, as being dyslexic doesn’t mean your thick, doesn’t mean you don’t understand grammar, etc. She gets more than a little angered when people trot out dyslexia as some sort of excuse for not being able to use language properly.

    Junkyard
    Member

    There’s a difference between “conversational” and “wrong” though,

    Is there ? Do we all have to be like you?Reading this I was , like, so livid, literally
    You know what this means so really why GAS?

    and if people know that they’re using the incorrect form of a word, but do so in the name of being ‘conversational’ they’re even more idiotic than people who correct them!

    I think you are confusing folk who dont care with uptight, regimented anal types who care about every tiny detail as it causes them distress to see some’thing out of place- see what i did there 😉

    For those of you with high literacy skills, who also seem to lack basic social skills,
    Just read all of that, and I’m afraid I still think “I’m dyslexic” is used as a catch all for any form of inability to write properly.

    We thank you for proving the point re social skills – face palm
    you should of [ i am loving this BTW] worked as hard on your empathy/ your comprehension as you what you had done have on your grammar 🙄

    See no matter how silly I get you still know the point being made so really why care?

    From reading all of that I don’t see how saying “should of” or “your going to have to do something” (both of which are common, and personally I find infuriating) is anything to do with dyslexia, it’s either laziness or poor education.

    You should care less about such a trivial issue, like literally, as you know what they mean. Just as you know what that means despite it hurting your sensibilities to the point you questioning others intellect.

    You do realise language usages chances and we dont all talk like Chaucer or Shakespeare wrote

    Most people I’ve spent time with using English as their second language have asked me to correct their English wherever possible so that they can learn.

    Correcting someone who asks for help and wishes to improve their language skills is fine and a good thing to do. However grammar is rarely corrected, on the internet, to be helpful .It’ s done for the poster to appear more knowledgeable/smarter/brighter than the person they correct – its like a middle class way of going Hey thicko shut it whist pretending they are “helping”. They are almost always not trying to help and really who GAS if you know what they meant why are you “correcting”?

    Junkyard
    Member

    She gets more than a little angered when people trot out dyslexia as some sort of excuse for not being able to use language properly

    Good news STW says its ok to call them thick

    zokes
    Member

    Agreed in full. Mrs CFH is very dyslexic, if there can be such a thing. When stressed, she could spell “cat” as “pxxlhyyupnnsayyflxxssqq” and it would make perfect sense to her. She knows the difference between “should have” and “should of”, however, as being dyslexic doesn’t mean your thick, doesn’t mean you don’t understand grammar, etc. She gets more than a little angered when people trot out dyslexia as some sort of excuse for not being able to use language properly.

    Ditto, both on the very dyslexic wife, and the sentiment.

    Mine tried to set fire to all her books when she was 14 as she was fed up of the words moving around 😯

    It is more than just spelling though, the whole ability to process information, especially when stressed, is a lot more tricky.

    Doesn’t stop her boiling my blood when she uses grocers’ apostrophe’s though….

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    Is there ? Do we all have to be like you?Reading this I was , like, so livid, literally
    You know what this means so really why GAS?

    That’s conversational, that’s not what we’re talking about. The statement was that conversational is ok, but was being used to talk about incorrect grammar/spelling.

    “Is their? Do wee awl have two bee like ewe?” is wrong, totally different.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    I think there may well be people who blame dyslexia for being bad spellers, same as there are people who say they have a migrane when they have a headache, or blame their hormones for being overweight.

    That’s a reflection on them though not the conditions they don’t have.

    As for minor grammatical points then yes – some are not helpful. Like dangling prepositions; I was reading the other day that these rules aren’t rules at all, they just stem from someone’s style guide published 300 years ago.

    However saying ‘should of’ instead of ‘should have’ is really messing up the structure of the language. ‘Should have’ is a specific grammatical form, a modal verb, and has a meaning; ‘Should of’ is nonsense that happens to sound similar.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    grocers’ apostrophe’s

    See, if I typed that I spend the next 10 minutes worrying I’d got one if not both of them in the wrong place.

    zokes
    Member

    See, if I typed that I spend the next 10 minutes worrying I’d got one if not both of them in the wrong place.

    One is correct, one is tongue in cheek 😉

    Junkyard
    Member

    EDIT: For Njee
    I understood your post – you knew i would when you wrote it so its somewhat weakens any point you wish to make about it being wrong.
    You communicated your ideas to me and that is the primary goal with communication

    Premier Icon teamhurtmore
    Subscriber

    Zokes 😉 given the thread’s subject that was another corker.

    JY, it’s a bit of a stretch to say that STW says its ok to call people thick. Can’t see much evidence of that.

    The death of adverbs and their replacement with adjectives (especially in sporting commentary, punditry, etc) and “Me and John….” grate with me at the moment.

    Plus iPad’s auto spell function!

    zokes
    Member

    I understood your post – you knew i would when you wrote it so its somewhat weakens any point you wish to make about it being wrong.
    You communicated your ideas to me and that is the primary goal with communication

    If that’s aimed at me, then you’re barking up the wrong tree. I was concurring with Flashy – I hadn’t even seen your post when I wrote mine.

    Read it again and you might see it as intended, i.e. humour.

    Or, you could just get worked up – whatever work’s for you 😉

    Plus iPad’s auto spell function!

    😆

    Premier Icon teamhurtmore
    Subscriber

    Read it again and you might see it as intended, i.e. humour.

    Or, you could just get worked up – whatever work’s for you

    Kinda (sorry) sums the whole thread up really, especially when you go back to the original alleged offence!

    Work’s 😀 😀

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