I was talking to a bike thief today….

Home Forum Bike Forum I was talking to a bike thief today….

  • This topic has 45 replies, 31 voices, and was last updated 5 years ago by  Drac.
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  • I was talking to a bike thief today….
  • ds1
    Member

    £80k ‘earned’ over how long, out of interest? – and how many bikes does that equal?

    Premier Icon coolhandluke
    Subscriber

    £40k a year take home!

    Before tax that would be nearer £55 as a salary!

    eskay
    Member

    plus free b&b once caught….

    as long as he didn’t drop the soap it’s a win win,…FFS…two years without riding a bike in the prime of life…. i’m sure he’s enjoying his wealth in fags, booze and weekends down the shopping mall…

    Premier Icon unklehomered
    Subscriber

    I hope you took the time to tell him he’s was amongst the worst kind of ****.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Subscriber

    assuming he sold for RRP.
    So in reality he got £500, and a ‘reach for the soap’ moment…

    project
    Member

    so thats 40 x 2000 quid bikes that some equally guilty thief is buying, perhaps imprison the buyer or shop who bought them as well.
    AS THEYRE CREATING THE DEMAND AND MARKET FOR THEM.

    godzilla
    Member

    80k’s worth of road bikes off country roads? Should have given him an OBE.

    As I said, I haven’t seen his OASYS report (which includes stuff from the police) & I don’t know if you lot realise this but prisoners do sometimes tell big fat lies in the hope of impressing other big fat liars. He might also be telling some truth. He did mention some brand names, Cannondale, Trek, Specialized & Fuji. I’ll be speaking to his offender supervisor on Tuesday to find out more.

    £80k ‘earned’ over how long, out of interest? – and how many bikes does that equal?
    Sounds like it was one fell swoop. Like a hijacked lorry or a warehouse raid. We’ll see.

    samuri
    Member

    but prisoners do sometimes tell big fat lies

    This was my initial thought. I mean, they’re not inside because they’re characters of virtue and I’m assuming bigging yourself up in the clink is one way of protecting yourself from the big boys and the crooked screws. 😉

    grum
    Member

    I hope you took the time to tell him he’s was amongst the worst kind of ****.

    Not really.

    the big boys and the crooked screws.

    Plenty of those about & many more to come.

    hope you took the time to tell him he’s was amongst the worst kind of ****.
    Not really.

    What Grum said. Bike thieves are at the lower end of the scale when you consider what they could be up to. No comparison to rapists & nonces surely??

    Who got two years for it (& has been inside before.)
    80K’s worth of high end road bikes ‘off the back of a lorry’
    I haven’t read his reports but he reckons he got away with the lot, so basically he got two years for 80K, or 40K ayear.
    Git!

    Premier Icon Nobby
    Subscriber

    Sounds like it was one fell swoop. Like a hijacked lorry or a warehouse raid. We’ll see.

    Well Trek did ‘lose’ a truckload from outside their depot in MK.

    The original post makes it sound like you believe him and are in awe of his achievement… just sayin’

    Could be he’s talking complete crap

    Junkyard
    Member

    The original post makes it sound like you believe him and are in awe of his achievement… just sayin’

    Was it this bit that led you to this conclusion?

    Git!

    Seems odd to claim a cycling prison officer would be in awe of a cycle thief tbh…gentle trolling???just sayin’

    Premier Icon takisawa2
    Subscriber

    Has he got any left ?

    😀

    [Joke].

    rudebwoy
    Member

    if they are not personal property , then they will have been insured , so a lot less grief for all. He is just a commodity liberator– i assume a lot of people got a themselves a bargain…. if on the other hand he was nicking pre owned bikes, thats a whole different ball game !

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    No difference what so ever it’s theft.

    You sound like that copper i met once who was convinced there was no difference between cannabis and heroin.

    I mean they’re both drugs right? O.o

    Holyzeus
    Member

    Poor thread, Git is not the word i’d be using

    cynic-al
    Member

    He’ll prob get a Di2 Pinarello inside along with full sky, hookeer, jacuzzi, holidays etc.

    No difference what so ever it’s theft.

    Maybe no difference legally, but you can’t seriously think there’s no moral difference between stealing a bike worth £1000 from someone who has spent most of their disposable income on it, or from a manufacturer who has got a warehouse full of them ?

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    When I read the OPs post at 4.30am I read it completely different. 😳

    No wait. Sorry.

    It’s the suggesting it’s fine because they are insured and that some people will have got a bargain that is a foolish comment. It’s theft no matter who they belong to but yes it’s some what of a shame if it belongs to an individual. Morals are the same though, you just don’t steal.

    IanMunro
    Member

    Maybe no difference legally, but you can’t seriously think there’s no moral difference between stealing a bike worth £1000 from someone who has spent most of their disposable income on it, or from a manufacturer who has got a warehouse full of them ?

    You can’t seriously think there’s no moral difference between nicking a vanity mamil purchase that can be replaced under house insurance, or stealing a shop load of bikes, bankrupting the owner, and loosing several people their jobs?

    Assumptions, assumptions 🙂

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Or

    You can’t seriously think there’s no moral difference between nicking a vanity mamil purchase that can be replaced under house insurance, or stealing a manufacturer’s load of bikes, meaning they stop supplying the UK putting people out of jobs and less money for the UK economy.

    Premier Icon notmyrealname
    Subscriber

    Maybe no difference legally, but you can’t seriously think there’s no moral difference between stealing a bike worth £1000 from someone who has spent most of their disposable income on it, or from a manufacturer who has got a warehouse full of them ?

    Wow, what a ******* stupid comment.

    Where would I stand regarding the morals if I break into your house and steal your bikes?
    Surely if they’re insured, it’s morally fine as only the big nasty insurance company lose out?

    andyrm
    Member

    You can’t seriously think there’s no moral difference between nicking a vanity mamil purchase that can be replaced under house insurance, or stealing a shop load of bikes, bankrupting the owner, and loosing several people their jobs?

    Assumptions, assumptions

    ^^ This. I hate it when people think it’s ok to rip off a business, either by theft, dishonest returns or whatever.

    If the bike industry was a cash rich one, people at all levels would be on big money like in IT/tech. They’re not. Losing £80k of bikes, whether you’re a distributor or manufacturer, will make a massive impact and affect not only sales, cashflow and global stock movement, but also potentially make it difficult to insure the warehouse again, both in terms of physical product insurance and business continuity cover.

    Pity you didn’t help him have a slip on the stairs……..

    IanMunro
    Member

    Or

    You can’t seriously think there’s no moral difference between nicking a vanity mamil purchase that can be replaced under house insurance, or stealing a manufacturer’s load of bikes, meaning they stop supplying the UK putting people out of jobs and less money for the UK economy.

    Yes, that’s better.

    OCB
    Member

    He’ll prob get a Di2 Pinarello inside

    … and that’d be punishment enough I’d think.
    😉

    quartz
    Member

    No difference what so ever it’s theft.

    What if the bikes were distributed at very low prices, to those of limited financial means, enabling them to become fitter and healthier, and also to potentially find employment further afield, if they were jobless? Thus reducing the burden on the NHS, and boosting the UK economy? At the same time, reducing the margins for greedy companies making large profits on imported goods (something which has led to the decline of UK industry and manufacturing)? Not to mention helping increase insurance premiums, thus leading to increased tax revenue from insurance companies?

    Every cloud.

    Premier Icon notmyrealname
    Subscriber

    What if the bikes were distributed at very low prices, to those of limited financial means, enabling them to become fitter and healthier, and also to potentially find employment further afield, if they were jobless? Thus reducing the burden on the NHS, and boosting the UK economy? At the same time, reducing the margins for greedy companies making large profits on imported goods (something which has led to the decline of UK industry and manufacturing)? Not to mention helping increase insurance premiums, thus leading to increased tax revenue from insurance companies?

    It doesn’t matter, it’s still theft and it’s still wrong. It doesn’t matter who they’re stolen from or who they’re sold to, it’s wrong.
    Pretty simple really.

    quartz
    Member

    What about the exploitation of workers in 3rd world countries to mine/produce many of the raw materials/components that comprise bicycles? Isn’t that ‘wrong’?

    The bikes will have been insured against theft. Are the workers insured against injury, abuse, illness or poverty? Do such workers really have much ‘choice’ about what they do, or a proportionate (for their efforts) share of the profits gained through the whole commercial process?

    Is ‘wrong’ simply a black and white matter? Or are there shades of grey in between?

    Premier Icon cakefacesmallblock
    Subscriber

    Theft is theft. It’s wrong and deserves punishment. Re- offending is for the terminally thick or socially inept and irresponsible.
    OOOH ! Let’s pat them on the head and give them some rehab.

    Whenever anything gets stolen, someones day / life / business is spoiled.

    quartz
    Member

    Theft is theft. It’s wrong and deserves punishment

    What about exploitation of others in order to profit from their endeavours, with little or no thought given to their welfare, well being or safety?

    Is the ownership of something that is the result of immoral and unethical activity ok?

    quartz – Member
    Theft is theft. It’s wrong and deserves punishment
    What about exploitation of others in order to profit from their endeavours, with little or no thought given to their welfare, well being or safety?

    That’s fine, it’s the way the world works.

    quartz
    Member

    That’s fine, it’s the way the world works.

    So, if I take your bike from you because ‘that’s the way the world works’, that’s ok is it?

    quartz – Member
    That’s fine, it’s the way the world works.
    So, if I take your bike from you because ‘that’s the way the world works’, that’s ok is it?

    No that’s theft and it’s illegal.

    quartz
    Member

    No that’s theft and it’s illegal.

    As are many of the practices employed by companies involved in mining etc. Certainly according to UK law, and often within the countries the operations are carried out. Bearing in mind that in many countries, the ‘law’ favours the employers over the workers, and workers often have little or no recourse to legal action even if their employers are acting illegally. Is it ok to own products produced under such circumstances?

    Point I’m making is that rather than get hysterical over what is relatively low-level crime, we should be looking at the bigger picture of what causes crime, and what creates criminality. Our insatiable desire for consumer products directly drives the exploitation of others, who are conveniently out of sight and mind. Truth is that we are all guilty of consuming products of human exploitation and maltreatment, so it’s a bit hypocritical to treat bicycle thieves as low-lifes; they’re just other layers in the whole exploitation system. The global bicycle industry isn’t some cosy fluffy self-sustaining communal love-in; it’s yet another part of global industry that creates enormous environmental, social and cultural damage. just because that exploitation doesn’t harm you personally, doesn’t mean it’s not harmful.

    It’s ok to condemn the bike thief, as long as you condemn yourself equally for being a part of that exploitative cycle. If you didn’t have a bike, the thief wouldn’t be able to steal it.

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