Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 92 total)
  • I don’t want to go all Daily Mail
  • neilnevill
    Free Member

    I would think auto dip is not the solution.  Its a help but isn’t the problem dazzle from super bright and poorly aligned dip beam?  In 30+ years of driving full beam lights that a driver is slow or forgetful to dip have always been dazzling,  modern led lights don’t significantly add to that do they? Halogen,  hid, led or whatever are all in the ‘kin’ell that’s too bright!’ Group at full beam.  However I do find myself feeling ‘a bit’ dazzled by increasing numbers of oncoming cars where it seems to be super bright and white dipped beam is the cause.

    Perhaps dipped beam needs to be set at a lower/shorter position and mot tests need a better way to check it.

    desperatebicycle
    Full Member

    LED lights have a shorter visible “throw” on the road – which is why you see so many with their full beams on on 30-40mph roads. It’s definitely a fairly new phenomenon. I can happily drive at 70 with a dipped beam in my 2011, non LED lit car on the dark sections along the A27, but get so many with high beams dazzling. Glad they are reviewing these lights and hope it forces a change, but I doubt it.

    molgrips
    Free Member

    I have looked into this a bit.

     the elevated headlight positions of SUVs which everyone seems to want to drive

    There is a picture of a headlight bulb with a percentage next to it on the plastic on the front of your engine bay. This is the specified gradient of your headlights.  It’s a bigger number on SUVs for this reason, so it shouldn’t affect you unless you are really close and you are in a super lowered sportscar.

    I have found that lots of cars seem to come with poorly adjusted headlights from the factory.  As long as they don’t dazzle, they will pass an MOT, no matter how badly adjusted they are.  Both Hyundais I have had have had lights all over the shop, mostly pointing at the floor 3m infront of the car and way to the left.  This is not how they are meant to be.

    I think that lots of drivers have headlights like this – so that they aren’t really illuminating the road ahead, and this means that oncoming lights look worse because they are surrounded by blackness. I am quite sensitive to bright lights in general, however I do ok driving at night because my own headlights are good and adjusted well so they illuminate the road ahead even on dip.  The lights on the Leaf were crap though, which meant everyone else’s lights dazzled me – one reason I got rid of the car.

    Also bear in mind that a lot of people are buying aftermarket LED bulbs for their non-LED equipped cars, so it’s possible that these are the ones dazzling you.

    I can happily drive at 70 with a dipped beam in my 2011, non LED lit car on the dark sections along the A27

    This is not possible when your lights are pointing at the floor since you can only see about 10m ahead which is not at all safe at 70mph.

    squirrelking
    Free Member

    It’s a bigger number on SUVs for this reason, so it shouldn’t affect you unless you are really close and you are in a super lowered sportscar.

    Yeah but no. Standard Focus estate and Mondeo hatch, frequently blinded head on and by Tadjars from behind.

    I have found that lots of cars seem to come with poorly adjusted headlights from the factory. As long as they don’t dazzle, they will pass an MOT, no matter how badly adjusted they are.

    My own research say this is not true. Plenty fail on their first MOT.

    This is not possible when your lights are pointing at the floor since you can only see about 10m ahead which is not at all safe at 70mph.

    Lolwut? Want to think about that one and come back?

    scud
    Free Member

    I have found living in Norfolk this year that we have areas constantly flooded, with potholes the worst i’ve seen and whole sides of roads collapsed down.

    Many of the roads are either single track with occasional passing places, or are double width, but only just, so both cars have to pull right to the side.

    If you’re not being blinded by the lights, so may SUV drivers, drive too far out from the side of the road, especially if they are shorter in stature, they don’t seem to actually know where the nearside front of their car is in relation to edge of road, so when driving in the dark, you are forced to drive right over to the edge to avoid a collision, whilst half blinded by the lights.

    Four new nearside tyres in one winter, 3 front and one rear.

    jamesoz
    Full Member

    Interesting, my local MOT places seem really hot on lighting. Had a fail because a bit of the bulbs paint had come off, advisory for marginal colour difference in indicators and a fail for dim sidelights.
    They’ve also adjusted my headlamp aim up before now.

    Then I’ve also known them to miss loose suspension components and give advisories for adjustable wheel bearings.

    Depends on the tester on the day I guess.

    johndoh
    Free Member

    ***so may SUV drivers, drive too far out from the side of the road, especially if they are shorter in stature***
    What on earth are you saying? Small people can’t drive larger cars? What a crock of hairy bollocks.

    Jamze
    Full Member

    It causes me issues, but I do struggle with light sensitivity and headaches. Even setting up HDR on the TV, where you have a bright white box with a logo and have to adjust brightness hurts my eyes 🙄 Can’t look at the wife’s SAD light either.

    squirrelking
    Free Member

    What on earth are you saying? Small people can’t drive larger cars? What a crock of hairy bollocks.

    Defence presents Exhibit A:

    kerley
    Free Member

    Four new nearside tyres in one winter, 3 front and one rear.

    Sounds like driving may not be for you.

    slowoldman
    Full Member

    LED lights have a shorter visible “throw” on the road

    I miss my old long range Cibie Oscars.

    squirrelking
    Free Member

    Sounds like driving may not be for you.

    TBF I suffer from dickheads that have no idea how big their car is, in my case they come flying down the road with a wing mirror to spare either side and get all butthurt when I don’t move over to let them through. Usually it’s fine as they just use the pavement instead.

    scud
    Free Member

    Sounds like driving may not be for you.

    I’m good thanks, held driving licences in 4 countries, have an HGV licence from the army and have driven Land Rovers length of Africa and South America.

    The issue is was trying to describe is that it is very difficult to see potholes and the edge of the road crumbling on a country lane, when being blinded and simultaneously having that same SUV that is blinding you drive 4ft out from their side of the road forcing you over into the verge.

    See it all the time, people think they need a SUV for better visibility, then proceed to constantly be the worst drivers.

    johndoh
    Free Member

    ***I’m good thanks, held driving licences in 4 countries, have an HGV licence from the army and have driven Land Rovers length of Africa and South America.***

    So your issue is clearly that you think you are far, far superior to all of us mere mortals then?

    scud
    Free Member

    Nothing like that at all. Purely observational, see every type of vehicle driving towards me on commute to work, 90% of which is country lanes, everything from combines, large tractors, 4×4 etc, I can guarantee if the vehicle is at least a 2 metres out from their side of the road and scared to get there tyres dirty it will be an SUV, the superiority complex seems to come from thinking you need a fashion vehicle and to look down on others, and constantly always expecting others to be the ones to give way as you barge your way through, normally wouldn’t bother me, but the state of our rural roads is terrible after this winter, some parts have been constantly flooded for months on end.

    kelvin
    Full Member

    The issue is was trying to describe is that it is very difficult to see potholes and the edge of the road crumbling on a country lane, when being blinded and simultaneously having that same SUV that is blinding you drive 4ft out from their side of the road forcing you over into the verge.

    Agree with this entirely… on small roads the vehicle coming the other way having a combination of high and blinding lights, needing more road space, yet being driven as if it was a diddy hot hatch with seemingly no sense of road position… I’d say the result is “an annoyance” at the very least… and increasingly common.

    Keva
    Free Member

    Purely observational, see every type of vehicle driving towards me on commute to work,

    To be fair this does happen a lot, even people driving around parked cars. They’ll drive on the wrong side of the road towards oncoming traffic then expect the other person to give way to them. It happens to me whether I’m in a car or on my bike. It’s not anything to do with them being short people who don’t know where their nearside wheel is though, that is complete bollocks. It’s more to do with either really shit driving or trying to intimidate you into moving over and giving way to them.

    I’ll never forget the time when some berk in a Jaguar was driving straight towards me on the wrong side of the road, overtaking parked cars, whilst I was cycling into town one lunchtime. He was accelerating up to at least 45-50mph in a 30, and there was just enough space  for me between him and the kerb. It was a cold December day so I had my thickest sealskinz gloves on, I held my space and just popped my right hand out as he got close enough to see. His wing mirror then slapped my hand and went sailing about 20ft into the air and smashed to smitherines on the road. Didn’t half give my hand a sting even through gloves but it was worth it. I then heard that sound of car reversing really quickly,.

    multi21
    Free Member

    I suppose the combination of being shorter and the raised ride height/high window line on SUVs would make it a little harder to see where the nearside kerb is for a shorter person. Shouldn’t be a problem if the mirrors/seat heights are correctly adjusted though.

    johndoh
    Free Member

    ^^^^ All this stuff about short people is nonsense – anyone who knows how large their car is can easily judge where the kerb is, irrespective of their height.

    Houns
    Full Member

    I swear car designers don’t drive their test cars in real world conditions, or see what their car is like from the perspective of other drivers…screens instead of buttons and **** lighting just proves my theory.

    +1 for noticing other car drivers not moving over far enough on smaller roads, been like it for a few years now. Toasters* (*left the auto correct in as it’s funny).

    johndoh
    Free Member

    *screens instead of buttons*

    1,000,000% – how on earth anyone can cope with a Tesla is beyond me. Hateful vehicles inside and out.

    thisisnotaspoon
    Free Member

    I think it’s jus that they’re brighter. There’s no sensible “65W” limit to them.

    And the sharp cut offs + SUV heights mean that when you do drip under their dipped beam it feels like you’re absolutely blinded as they go from looking like DRL’s to fliping lazer beams.

    LED lights have a shorter visible “throw” on the road

    Photons (of a given energy) are photons (of a given energy), They don’t get absorbed by air any quicker or slower  unless you pick some that match the absorption spectra of O2/N2/H2O (which is outside the visible spectrum).

    LED’s do tend to have a sharper cut-off, but that because they’re new.  The OH’s fiesta has a sharp cut off too, but it’s halogen.  That just means there’s less light spilling out above the beam being thrown down the road.

    squirrelking
    Free Member

    I can see the logic in the throw argument, they just have a higher efficacy, as witnessed by brighter street lights with less light pollution. I think you’re both making the same point.

    jamesoz
    Full Member

    Forgot to dip my feeble main beam on a section of road this evening(flame away), nobody seemed to notice.
    Less than a year old Van but Halogens.

    kerley
    Free Member

    The issue is was trying to describe is that it is very difficult to see potholes and the edge of the road crumbling on a country lane

    If you continue to drive when you cannot see then as I said, maybe driving is not for you.  If you cannot see then stop, wait for oncoming car to pass and then continue when you can see.

    I live rurally where there is no lighting and have the same issues on crumbling roads, potholes covered in water etc,. but yet I haven’t had any punctures.

    If there are bright lights and roads that are too narrow for two cars to pass each other at speed then drive accordingly…

    Drac
    Full Member

    LED lights have a shorter visible “throw” on the road – which is why you see so many with their full beams on on 30-40mph roads. It’s definitely a fairly new phenomenon. I can happily drive at 70 with a dipped beam in my 2011

    Absolute nonsense. As someone who used to drive various vehicles at high speed, LED is much clearer with a better cast than any halogen I’ve driven.

    BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    So your issue is clearly that you think you are far, far superior to all of us mere mortals then?

    Tbf, the majority of STW drivers are possessed of limitless, superhuman driving skills and physiological attributes. Most STWers can rally a RWD car on summer tyres on compacted snow and outperform factory ABS systems when crash (sic) braking on ice. Similarly the average STWer can maintain 70mph plus average speeds on twisting rural lanes at night using only sidelights thanks to superior vision and reactions.

    Most have at some vague point in the past, been trained in fast road driving by Stirling Moss, the SAS, Lewis Hamilton or a combination of all three. And road behaviour which for less-skilled drivers would be lethally dangerous is, for most STW petrol-heads, ‘spirited driving’ or ‘making progress’.

    I factor this in whenever any sort of driving or driving-related thread occurs and am rarely disappointed.

    Did I ever mention how Google Map estimated journey-durations are invariably 50% or more slower than my actual journey time? I often average more than 70mph for a journey without breaking the National Speed Limit at any point. Skillz innit.

    In this case, can I just say, as someone who has driven various vehicles in a ‘spirited’ fashion for my entire life – no exaggeration! – that modern lights are unnecessarily bright and I frequently turn mine off to hone my driving skills at night. If you need lights to drive in the dark, you should consider surrendering your licence or confine your driving to daylight hours. Just saying, etc, YMMV.

    alpin
    Free Member

    “V. 2 Osram LED Nightbreakers”

    Are they TUV compliant? Didn’t know there was an LED Nightbreaker. Certainly not MOT compliant here.


    @jamesoz

    Ja! Looking on the Osram compatibility page and it seems it’s just EU countries where they’re eligible.

    rsl1
    Free Member

    I think it’s partly driven by LEDs being self levelling, which means the driver has no control to dip them further if they’re getting flashed a lot. There’s no need to have dipped beams at the max allowed height when driving around town, for example. Not that I imagine many if any people would ever change that willingly

    Olly
    Free Member

    In my experience it’s largely Teslas, Minis and cars that probably shouldn’t have LEDs in the standard housing which are the biggest culprit.

    MOT failiure to put LED bulbs in a non LED “festoon” or whatever they are called.

    Ive said since day 1 supid twinkly DLRs are pointless and hateful. The “light bar” fashion even worse.

    The newesrt Audi headlights that are supposed to be able to leave a “black box” over areas the car decides are pedestrians, cyclists and other vehicle rear windows. A great idea but i woudlnt want to have to pay to replace one!

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1031621_audi-demonstrates-effects-of-matrix-led-headlights-video

    johndoh
    Free Member

    ^ @Olly, Mercedes, BMW and I am sure a load of other manufacturers do that already so not sure why its a big announcement. My Mercedes GLC (four years old) has them. They also adjust the throw pattern automatically (using GPS) when approaching junctions, corners, roundabouts etc. 99% of the time they are absolutely amazing but the sensor to adjust the light pattern around oncoming/following traffic can get confused in heavier rain so I have to switch off the auto lights.

    Edit – I have just seen that the article was written in 2015…

    tenfoot
    Full Member

    There has just been an OTA update giving newer Teslas (post 2021 I think) matrix headlights, so will be interesting to see if that reduces glare that Teslas often seem guilty of producing.

    Jamze
    Full Member

    I think matrix headlamps is still not legal in the US, so later cars had the hardware, but were not enabled for the US market.

    fatmountain
    Free Member

    Not all SUV drivers are selfish dickheads, but all selfish dickheads appear to want to drive one.

    mert
    Free Member

    I think matrix headlamps is still not legal in the US

    They aren’t, massive market in people activating them off their own backs.

    Every time you get an OTA update or a service, they switch them back off.

    FWIW, lots of manufacturers looking at smarter lights, low power settings in certain areas/certain scenarios to reduce glare, smarter matrix settings etc.

    LED lights have a shorter visible “throw” on the road 

    No, they don’t. They meet the same requirements as HID/halogen/filament/candle in a jar lights.

    Unless of course they’ve been set up by a muppet. Or damaged

    Steeply angled lenses make it hard to get it right too, there’s much less tolerance to dirt/damage on the glass, or build tolerances.

    jamesoz
    Full Member

    “ MOT failiure to put LED bulbs in a non LED “festoon” or whatever they are called”

    Yes it is, but that relies on it being spotted or not being swapped to halogen for the test.

    kelvin
    Full Member

    If there are bright lights and roads that are too narrow for two cars to pass each other at speed then drive accordingly…

    Great. Of course, in this scenario, you only control one of the two cars.

    robertajobb
    Full Member

    All the SUV moaners….go find me a new big estate car from Ford, Toyota, Honda, Volvo, etc. They don’t exist. Mondeo estate ? Nope. Avensis estate ? Nope. Accord estate ? Nope. V70 ? Nope.

    So many are basically forced into an SUV because most mainstream car manufacturers have decided that’s what is being made available.
    (And I’m not having an Audi or BMW as they’re all driven by waaaankers, and Mercs are waaaay to spendy).

    kelvin
    Full Member

    No one is “forced” to buy a new car. Plenty of great examples of used estates and compact MPVs out there. But the vehicles aren’t the problem… being set up and driven in a way that blinds oncoming traffic and forcing them off the road is. All drivers have a responsibility for their vehicles and how they drive them. Buy a bigger car with higher brighter lights that are more sensitive to set up and use issues… then it’s your responsibility to ensure you’re not blinding drivers, allowing them room, and travelling at appropriate speeds on smaller roads.

    neilnevill
    Free Member

    Octavia still do an estate don’t they? Or superb if you want really really big.

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