Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 61 total)
  • How to safely clear higher drop offs.
  • lotto
    Member

    Daughters ability is now outstripping my knowledge. Could someone point me in the direction of good educational/instructional text or videos on how to negotiate drop offs that are too high to be rolled? I normally find a way around these features but she is now tackling drops that are much higher than her front wheel. (650B). She is managing but I’ve witnessed a couple of close OTB moments. Luckily wears a full face helmet but I’d still prefer she didn’t stack. If times were normal we would be getting lessons for her, which we after currently trying to find. (Edinburgh area if anybody knows good instructors). Instructional videos other than her watching reruns of Danny Hart Champery run for technique may help her in the meantime though. Thanks.

    Premier Icon schmiken
    Subscriber

    If they’ve got a downhill or flat run in, you need to practice short manuals,if after an uphill it’s wheelies.

    Practice those first, then you can start to work on timing to use them on drops.

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    first things first, you don’t need to progress to drops as high as your front wheel to practise the technique with the risk that entails….you can practice off a kerb even, for timing and technique.

    I’m not good enough to explain how to do it as it’s a feeling thing and an argument will soon break out on here about whether you’re supposed to push, pull, compress, unweight, or whatever else. But if you can do it off a kerb, or a foot high, you can do it off 3 foot, 5 foot, – it’s just the flight time gets longer.

    Premier Icon howsyourdad1
    Subscriber

    Bones mend, press send.

    Premier Icon snooze
    Member

    tails
    Member

    These guys videos are pretty good.

    Premier Icon howsyourdad1
    Subscriber

    Sorry, my earlier comment wasn’t helpful, although it is true. Loads of vids on youtube, just ride off it fast enough. No front wheel lifts, manual or wheelies or bunnyhops. Right at the last second (right at the end of the drop) move your weight backwards  slightly.   Lots of people move weight back way to early. Good luck young sender!

    tails
    Member

    You snooze you lose.

    lotto
    Member

    @snooze and @tails. Thank you. They look like good instructional videos. With the plethora available on you tube and me not fully understanding what I’m looking at it is good/bad/indifferent it is nice to get an idea of what others have used to gain results.

    Premier Icon ajantom
    Subscriber

    Just get her to watch lots of PB Friday Fails, and do the opposite.

    qwerty
    Member

    Jedi did a video for STW a while back which I can’t seem to find…

    Key bit for me was “every action has an equal and opposite reaction” so, applying that to drops, you push down immediately prior to the drop, the pressure of your push down being proportional to the size of the drop, the action of that being that the front wheel lifts…. I think….

    Oh, and don’t have your mates watching you from the bottom of the drop, it’ll distract you from where you need to be looking.

    This, there’s no need to be obsessively throwing weight back like you see lots of folk doing, just puts your body in the wrong place to land it.

    Sorry, my earlier comment wasn’t helpful, although it is true. Loads of vids on youtube, just ride off it fast enough. No front wheel lifts, manual or wheelies or bunnyhops. Right at the last second (right at the end of the drop) move your weight backwards slightly. Lots of people move weight back way to early. Good luck young sender!

    As above, learn to manual (dip heels and wrists, pull back on bars and push forward on pedals – but gently, and smoothly). Learn to get it perfect off a kerb first, then the technique is the same off anything bigger, it’s just confidence. No need to hang off the back of the bike, when you land you want to be able to draw a vertical long through the bottom bracket and your centre of gravity.

    I’ve been relearning drops / hops / manuals on a BMX which really makes you focus on the technique, but makes the MTB feel really cumbersome.

    jedi
    Member

    Yep. As @qwerty says

    Premier Icon RicB
    Subscriber

    Just get her to watch lots of PB Friday Fails, and do the opposite.

    Ha ha, I was thinking exactly the same!

    My 2p; it’s all about legs and body position, if she’s using her arms she’s doing it wrong.

    With a ‘proper’ technique she’ll be able to drop off quite slowly, rather than relying on speed-is-your-friend and hope for the best techniques.

    TheBrick
    Member

    Little hop can be good too. Quiet good for giving you more control on where you land

    Sui
    Member

    don’t know if it’s in the vids, but one thing you see people doing a lot is trying to look over their front wheel to see where it’s going, this naturally pulls your body weight forward and you end up nose diving. If you’re not doing a blind drop, then spot your landing early, but importantly as you leave the plateau, look forward, head up (level), look at your exit path and relax.

    I’ve been guilty, especially when trying new features, of using speed to get me out of trouble, and this is fine on some things, but most drops only ever require a small punch and not to let the front drop too early. Sometimes it also helps to pre-empt the lip with a small hop, but i only ever find this helps if the feature has a small kick in it.

    By the time you get to doing blind drops, a good techinique combined with enough speed will compensate for the “o shiv, that’s bigger than i thought” moment..

    Ridelines are back working so you could look at getting some lessons from them, a lesson with Jess Stone would be great for your daughter.

    stevehine
    Member

    [very slight] hijack – I’d love to get better at drops; I’m comfortable up to a point but is there anywhere within an hour or so of Leeds where there’s a set of increasingly big ones (like in the vid above) I could go and practise on for a few hours ?

    slforrest
    Member

    Another vote for the April and Kyle video above. I just had coaching at the weekend and this was the techniques we were taught for drop offs. It looks easier than it is I found, but then my old brain can’t cope with more than 1 thing at a time these days!

    Don’t manual, pop!

    Manuals are more difficult to execute right, and put your weight too far back for the landing, so you have to correct in mid air.

    You can practise the technique on kerbs at low speed – if you can land both wheels together going super slow off a tiny drop then you can do it faster off a bigger drop.

    Premier Icon howsyourdad1
    Subscriber

    Little hop can be good too. Quiet good for giving you more control on where you land

    negative ghostrider

    Premier Icon RicB
    Subscriber

    [very slight] hijack – I’d love to get better at drops; I’m comfortable up to a point but is there anywhere within an hour or so of Leeds where there’s a set of increasingly big ones (like in the vid above) I could go and practise on for a few hours ?

    Stainburn has some, albeit not huge. The bigger one also has a slightly off-putting ‘land into a berm’ aspect…

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    I would hesitate to take advice from most of us (including myself in this), but something I’ve found useful is to just think of the movements required as similar to if I wasn’t on a bike.

    So bend your knees a bit as you pop off the drop, push them down as you fall and absorb the impact by bending knees again as you land.

    Premier Icon simon_g
    Subscriber

    I thought this recent Pinkbike video was good: https://youtu.be/T6iDi7J68Ls

    Premier Icon thebibbles
    Subscriber

    As said above, most of us here are riders not teachers so take everyone’s views with a pinch of salt, except @jedi who teaches people for a living and having had a few lessons I can safely say he talks sense. Maybe have a look at one of his videos here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwwrBTyAfpQ. I’ve found it’s just as much the mental side that stops you from doing larger jumps and drops.

    Mmm, interesting. You can’t argue with the outcome in the American couple’s video, but he’s basically just telling her to ride off at the correct speed.

    I’ve always been told, including by Jedi, to give that push or pop at the end of the take off and look up. Definitely needed at slower speeds and on not-so-perfect drops outside of bike parks.

    TheBrick
    Member

    negative ghostrider

    ? Sorry didn’t know what that means?

    Got to be the right speed for a hop or a pedal kick if really slow. Front wheel pop if in-between speeds.

    erictwinge
    Member

    [very slight] hijack – I’d love to get better at drops; I’m comfortable up to a point but is there anywhere within an hour or so of Leeds where there’s a set of increasingly big ones (like in the vid above) I could go and practise on for a few hours

    Assume you ridden Leeds UBP?

    theres nice drop there, 2 of them actually iirc. dead easy to lap…

    drop

    stevehine
    Member

    Yep; Leeds UBP is a (relatively) regular place to visit. That one is just a bit bigger than I’m comfortable with; I’m sure if I could muster up enough bravery I could do it; happy with all the other “black” lines in the quarry section ! But there’s not much in the way of progression. A few small 2 – maybe 3 ft drops around the place then boom; 6ft drop with a steep launch / landing. Just want something ‘in the middle’ to gain confidence with less risk!

    Premier Icon seb84
    Subscriber

    When jedi says push or pop what exactly does he mean? He’s clearly not shifting back in that video.
    Is it push down on the bars to pop the front wheel?

    “Is it push down on the bars to pop the front wheel?”

    No.

    When he coaches you he just calls it a push and then watches what you do and gives you guidance until you’re doing it right. The direction and force changes with the drop, it’s quite intuitive once you get in the habit.

    It’s not about keeping the front wheel up but about moving the whole bike dynamically. Moving like a human would off a drop rather than trying to balance a manual.

    Premier Icon ads678
    Subscriber

    Stainburn has some, albeit not huge. The bigger one also has a slightly off-putting ‘land into a berm’ aspect…

    Yep, not been there for a while after I landed badly and face planted into some rocks and knocked myself out!! Used to clear it regularly before then as well….

    I daren’t do the big one at LUBP either. 🙁

    Premier Icon sirromj
    Subscriber

    You know how as a kid you got on the bathroom scales and made the needle go crazy?

    Premier Icon seb84
    Subscriber

    Yer??

    Premier Icon maxtorque
    Subscriber

    Two things that helped me to do drops

    1) The size of your pop or front wheel lift are nothing to do with the (vertical) size of the drop and everything to do with how fast you are going off the drop. A technique to land both wheels together off a kerb works just the same to land two wheels off a 6 footer!

    2) Straight Arms = DANGER! If you have locked straight arms, and the front drops, you ARE going OTB, because you cannot in any way stop yourself being pulled forwards as the front drops (you can’t make you arms longer than they are when they are straight out already!) Unfortunately, as novices and scaredy pusses (like me) our natural tendancy is to move right back on the bike, and that creates those straightlocked out arms, so when we get our timing wrong, and the front drops too early, OTB we go! Staying the “Middle” of the bike is a LOT safer, because you have room to adjust to what ever happens, going right back early, means you have set your destiny and cannot change it. But staying, broadly, in the middle is, ime, really quite difficult and feels counter intuitive to people like me, esp when you are nervous of the drop……

    Premier Icon argee
    Subscriber

    Avoid any use of a manual or ‘wheelie’ on a drop off unless you are going at no speed at all (wheelie is good), or you are slowish and going flat to flat, so need to get that front wheel up.

    Bar those two extreme examples, it’s as the video above states, get the speed for the drop, follow someone in as per the video, then it’s just a case of learning to do the move at the right time, again as per the video.

    The manual stuff looks great, but unless you can hold a manual for a good distance, you may well end up going too early, then having the front dip at the worst possible time, then it’s OTB, same issue if you hit any type of lip on the exit, rear wheel will hang up, front will go down, OTB again.

    I much prefer the technique in this video if going over larger drop offs, it removes the above issues with a manual but keeps the benefits Drop off Video

    jedi
    Member

    @qwerty this video?
    Drops

    cyclelife
    Member

    It took Gareth at “A line coaching
    ” quite a while to get me out of the “just pop off it” Jedi method. Now loads more confident and landing decent drops even blind one’s.

    Well I read this thread and particularly the pink bike vid and thought “I don’t do it like that, do I?” So for shits and giggles and to a void work built a drop on the drive

    Turns out I do do it like that!

    First run


    Bit more speed

    Bit tail heavy, needs more “scoop”

    Not entirely sure what the point of that was, other than pink bike lass talks sense, but I had fun doing it!

    Found another pallet too so might be a part 2 later!

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