Viewing 24 posts - 1 through 24 (of 24 total)
  • How to decorate above a bay window?
  • johndoh
    Member

    I have some work to do on the exterior of our house which means repainting some tudor-effect wood above a bay window (similar to this)

    I have a low platform, three sets of A-frame ladders and a set of roof ladders however I cannot think how on earth I will reach the woodwork directly above the pitch of the roof line. I also have access to a scaffold tower but I still can’t think how I could reach across to the wood.

    Any ideas? Cheers.

    *looks at photo.

    *fails to see bay window

    Which bit are you talking about?

    Premier Icon mashr
    Subscriber

    *looks at photo.

    *fails to see tudor effect wood

    Which bit are you talking about?

    Premier Icon ads678
    Subscriber

    Yep that’s not a bay window. If I had to paint above that I’d just get a ladder.that goes higher that the low roof and lean….

    Premier Icon spooky_b329
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    3 section ladder and a top end attachment that stabilises the top of the ladder and holds it away from the wall so you don’t need to lean back so far.

    Premier Icon bearnecessities
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    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    That’s a modest house what kind of car do they drive?

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Subscriber

    Black Country joke:

    Anoch: “Them’s bay winders.”
    Ayli: “Well if them’s bay winders worram they?”

    Michael Bay Windows

    Easy.

    1. open upstairs window.
    2. hook paint pot onto window handle with old fashioned wire coat hanger
    3. step onto the windows ledge and grip the underside of the top of the open window frame with your left hand.
    4. This will leave your right hand free to wield paint brush in appropriate fashion.
    5. Reach and stretch until you have painted all required areas.

    *don’t do this.

    Premier Icon fossy
    Subscriber

    I have used a ladder with a stabilising frame at the top as suggested above. That was in my yoof – not now. Need to ‘touch up’ our woodwork that we completely replaced 5 years ago (with the help of a joiner). I’m thinking a roller on a long extension (that’s how I did the lower eves) but not the apex last time. I’m not good with heights these days.

    johndoh
    Member

    Okay, so that isn’t a bay window I accept (it isn’t a picture of our house, just one with a pitched roof at ground floor to demonstrate the sort of obstacle I need to work around).

    If I get a ladder.that goes higher that the low roof and lean it wouldn’t be stable enough and would just slide from under me.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    If you’re talking about the top right window in your pic then  utilising your existing kit as per the op it’d be

    Scaffold tower to eaves level at right hand side of garage  plus roof ladder on the right hand side pitch of the garage roof.

    Stand on roof ladder to paint.

    Repeat at left hand side of garage as necessary

    What colour do you want it to be?

    I think it would look good in orange, which means you could use one of these…

    Paintball gun and orange pellets

    joshvegas
    Member

    Wait for it to sell then it’s not your problem.

    Premier Icon kayak23
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    Premier Icon slackalice
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    You gotta love a bit of mock Tudor bullshit wood stuck onto the outside skin of brickwork! Actually, I don’t, I’d ban it, it generally brings nothing to anything anywhere.

    Sorry OP, my contribution to your dilemma is to recommend you remove it from your property and thereby erasing your bit of diy tasking and the aesthetic blot that is bullshit timber framing on late C20th houses.

    Vader
    Member

    You can hire yourself a cantilever system to attach to your mobile tower (or hire both). That should get you close enough.

    The ladder alternative plus ladder stay will also work provided you can fix the base of the ladder to prevent it slipping – either by staking the lawn or parking a vehicle up against the foot of the ladder. The biggest problem will be not soiling yourself while attempting to work at that height from a ladder. If you are not used to it I would avoid.

    joshvegas
    Member

    I’d be wary of mocking Tudor they’re a right violent bunch I heard.

    tewit
    Member

    It’s a right pain working on a lot of house’s due to the design and all the add ons like conservatories, garages, fencing and close proximity to neighbours house. I’ve needed to have ladders at silly angles to reach stuff. Ok if there’s a nice soft lawn or border to sink it in to (I could walk up with no hands😀) but obviously if it’s all paved then no chance. So if you’re not confident with how it is then either get some one in or decent scaffold.

    I’d be wary of mocking Tudor they’re a right violent bunch I heard.

    Canny crisps mind.

    Premier Icon slackalice
    Subscriber

    I’d be wary of mocking Tudor they’re a right violent bunch I heard.

    Canny crisps mind.

    😁

    johndoh
    Member

    Sorry OP, my contribution to your dilemma is to recommend you remove it from your property and thereby erasing your bit of diy tasking and the aesthetic blot that is bullshit timber framing on late C20th houses.

    I would rip the whole lot off but the previous owner tried to seal the edges with some kind of caulk which has bonded to the brickwork really badly and I know that removing that would be a much bigger job than painting the crappy boards.

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