How much should I expect to pay to get a limited slip diff fitted to a van?

Home Forum Chat Forum How much should I expect to pay to get a limited slip diff fitted to a van?

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  • How much should I expect to pay to get a limited slip diff fitted to a van?
  • Thinking more regarding labour. My layman mechanical skills suggest it’s a job that requires tools I don’t have lying around the garage (such as means to support the van while working on the underside).

    Van is a 2.5l diesel RWD Mazda Bongo.

    Premier Icon peteimpreza
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    £500 + V.A.T.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
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    Is it literally a direct bolt in from another van of the same model that had one fitted as standard?

    Even then – same prop shaft length, same drive shaft length, any need to work on traction control/stability programming?

    Is it literally a direct bolt in from another van of the same model that had one fitted as standard?

    There is a version of the van that came spec’d with it and I’ve been offered one from a Bongo previously, which is what I would use. I suspect it’s a pretty basic unit as the originals are 20+ years old.

    …any need to work on traction control/stability programming?

    Now this is where I am getting into new territory. 🙂

    Premier Icon wwaswas
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    If it’s literally a bolt in replacement then it’s probably a reasonable DIY proposition if you don;t mind an afternoon on your back swearing and have a trolley jack to take the weight of the diffs as you swap them.

    Frankly, I’d pay someone with a ramp £150 and have them do it.

    But do check on dimensions of flanges. drive shafts etc – maybe the LSD ones had beefed up driveshafts as they’ll put more load through the shaft on the side that’s not spinning than a convnetional one.

    Is this for getting out of muddy fields more easily or are you planning on racing it?

    sbob
    Member

    This van comes with an LSD:

    Is this for getting out of muddy fields more easily or are you planning on racing it?

    Basically getting out of muddy fields and getting down farm tracks. It’s a converted campers so it’s lumbering around with a lot of wood in the back so I’m looking at ways of helping it where I can.

    dmck16
    Member

    sbob – Member
    This van comes with an LSD

    Strange looking Jaguar… 😉

    This van comes with an LSD:

    😆 Nurburgring, here I come…

    Premier Icon sandwicheater
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    On a small high-jack, OP, do you have a drive away awning for your bongo?

    If so, how do you attach it to the van?

    5lab
    Member

    one word of warning – I’d be surprised if a 20-year old LSD really had much ‘lock’ left in it. Most LSDs work around a constantly-engaged clutch, which naturally wears over time (it is being slipped every time you’re not driving straight ahead on a completely flat road). If you’ve got it off-vehicle then it’d be worth replacing the clutch pack within it before you fit it to a new van.

    incidentally, you can get a lot of the effect of an LSD (in the ‘getting out of a muddy field’ sense) in a RWD vehicle by applying the handbrake loosely. If you’ve got one wheel with zero grip but the other with some grip, applying the handbrake gently allows the car to push some of the torque down the driven wheel, as the non-driven wheel is being resisted by the brake. Modern e-diffs work in a similar way (but, smartly, not braking the wheel with grip at the same time as the wheel without grip), but I’ve used this method with some success whilst driving across sandy bits of the sahara..

    Premier Icon wwaswas
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    I’ve used this method with some success whilst driving across sandy bits of the sahara..

    humblebrag of the day 😉

    On a small high-jack, OP, do you have a drive away awning for your bongo?

    We do. It’s not great, but it’s certainly adequate. I’ll dig out details later for you if you want.

    one word of warning – I’d be surprised if a 20-year old LSD really had much ‘lock’ left in it. Most LSDs work around a constantly-engaged clutch, which naturally wears over time (it is being slipped every time you’re not driving straight ahead on a completely flat road). If you’ve got it off-vehicle then it’d be worth replacing the clutch pack within it before you fit it to a new van.

    incidentally, you can get a lot of the effect of an LSD (in the ‘getting out of a muddy field’ sense) in a RWD vehicle by applying the handbrake loosely. If you’ve got one wheel with zero grip but the other with some grip, applying the handbrake gently allows the car to push some of the torque down the driven wheel, as the non-driven wheel is being resisted by the brake.

    Thanks, on both counts.

    humblebrag of the day

    😆

    Premier Icon jkomo
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    I’ve used that hand brake system getting my Marina out from a muddy car park in Kidderminster.
    (Also bragging)

    IHN
    Member

    Would the brake trick work using the footbrake on a FWD car? (for the next time I drive across the Sahara in our Mazda2)

    tinybits
    Member

    That’s an interesting technique – having driven my 1 series in the snow for the first time yesterday, it’s frankly appalling on summer tyres. I actually phone my wife and told her I wouldn’t be coming home as there’s no way I’d get back up the hill to home (about 5 miles away there’s a 1000ft climb). This might just make a bit of a difference!

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
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    humblebrag of the day

    Depends on whether he was meaning to drive across the sahara or whether he had just gotten very lost on the way to swindon.

    Premier Icon duncancallum
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    Are you Mark Thatcher

    lank45
    Member

    Nurburgring, here I come…

    Did this, in this van, in the wet, with RWD. I’d not recommend white boxer shorts for the journey.

    johnners
    Member

    incidentally, you can get a lot of the effect of an LSD (in the ‘getting out of a muddy field’ sense) in a RWD vehicle by applying the handbrake loosely.

    That’s an interesting technique – having driven my 1 series in the snow for the first time yesterday, it’s frankly appalling on summer tyres.

    Switching to DTC would be a better idea on a BMW wouldn’t it? That will apply braking to just the wheel without traction rather than both. Which is basically what 5lab goes on to say.

    DickBarton
    Member

    Or sticking narrower steel rims and winter tyres on it…

    Did this, in this van, in the wet, with RWD. I’d not recommend white boxer shorts for the journey.

    I can well believe that. 😯

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