How much quicker is a downhill rig?

Home Forum Bike Forum How much quicker is a downhill rig?

Viewing 42 posts - 1 through 42 (of 42 total)
  • How much quicker is a downhill rig?
  • Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    Depends on the track. The rougher and steeper it gets the bigger the gap.

    Well, if you have a rig as part of your quiver as well as an Enduro specific gnarpoon, you should be able to shred 3.76 more gnats on the big rig. Unless of course your cruising the brown pow, in which case you’ll need to be prepared for some serious roost.

    😉

    fergal
    Member

    Not gnarly, fast with roots, trees, I know it seems like a daft question, I timed myself riding a course that had been used for a timed run, I felt like I was riding as fast as a middle aged mincer could go, eyes on stalks, i would have been in the bottom of the field but not last.

    _tom_
    Member

    As said depends on the track I reckon. If its really rough, rooty etc I can imagine the dh would be quicker but for most other things I would’ve thought a trail bike would be quicker.

    Premier Icon stilltortoise
    Subscriber

    I hear Brendan Fairclough has some opinions on this…

    mikey74
    Member

    It depends on you more than the track: If you aren’t use to it then it could be slower as they do take a fair amount of commitment and skill to get the best out of.

    Depends what sort of timed run. I once took my DH bike out in the peaks to try and beat some strava times (I know, I know) and was very disappointed that I was slower with 9 inches than I was on my 140mm travel XC bike. Essentially if the section involves any pedalling, I’m probably quicker on a bike that can pedal well.

    This was Blacka Moor Devil’s Elbow and the Houndkirk Jumble road if you know them.

    On a proper downhill track though, the DH bike will be quicker. The steeper / faster, the bigger the gap would be. The Pietermaritzburg DH World Cup is a good example – plenty of people were riding long travel ‘Enduro’ bikes for that rather than full-on DH bikes and there was an advantage in some places and hinderance in others. Overall the times were similar between the riders on DH bikes and those on Enduro bikes – no clear advantage either way. Although Pietermaritzburg is relatively tame by DH world cup standards, it’s still pretty fast / steep compared to what most of us ride.

    Rorschach
    Member

    Jared Graves came 3rd at the World Champs on a 150mm travel trail bike.
    Greg Minaar won it on a 240mm travel Dh bike.
    There are no conclusions to be drawn from these facts.

    There are no conclusions to be drawn from these facts.

    That Pietermaritzburg is a borderline track? All the other tracks see riders using their big travel bikes exclusively.

    fergal
    Member

    Yep I figured if I had a full face, I might be able to commit more, couldn’t see me making up much more time though.

    Rorschach
    Member

    Imagine how fast you’d be with a neck brace……….

    Premier Icon kimbers
    Subscriber

    For uplift days etc on big tracks it can really help to be on a DH bike especially after a few runs when you’re getting tired the extra comfort and plushness helps

    fergal
    Member

    Anyone ridden a downhill bike and say a trail bike down the same timed run, just curious to know how much of an advantage you would have on the big bike.

    sq225917
    Member

    I’m faster nearly everywhere on my Meta SX than I was on my Session.

    toys19
    Member

    They are faster at absorbing money than any other bike. And they can do 120mph.

    hexhamstu
    Member

    Greg Minaar won it on a 240mm travel Dh bike.

    *216mm

    Imagine how fast you’d be with a neck brace and without any other armour, not even gloves……….

    😉

    sq225917
    Member

    Imagine how much faster you’d be having left a tear off and at least two cans of Relentpiss at the top of Steel City.

    Rorschach
    Member

    [video]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QyTyjQbvylg[/video]

    skolt
    Member

    the ability to land big drops and plough through rock gardens at full whack are the main advantages of using a DH bike.

    Hob Nob
    Member

    Depends really. You need to ride a DH bike quite hard to benefit from it.

    I race a 150mm 29er for the odd DH race. Much to the annoyance of the other guys, I nearly always podium, beating a bunch of people on DH bikes. It would probably be a different story down some super rough, steep & long tracks, but who knows until you give it a crack. It would take me a while to get back up to speed on a DH bike again, having not ridden one for a while.

    The limiting factor is generally the pink blob on top, rather than the bike. One of the guys I used to race with would regularly beat 75% of the field on a hardtail, at big races too (Dragons/Pearce/etc) so proper tracks as well. You bike will generally go a lot faster than you.

    Rorsach and sq, good work chaps!

    Rorschach
    Member

    I dream of being Jamie #swoons.

    legend
    Member

    I race a 150mm 29er for the odd DH race. Much to the annoyance of the other guys, I nearly always podium

    Roots and Rain link or it didn’t happen

    Podium is a noun. That aside, links/pics oidh.

    Hob Nob
    Member

    Roots and Rain link or it didn’t happen

    Really?

    Guess I must have dreamt it then 🙂

    legend
    Member

    Yeah I podium in those races too 😉

    Hob Nob
    Member

    What a coincidence.

    rocketman
    Member

    Stile Cop red run 4 mins + on Cannondale 140 mm trail bike
    Same run 2 1/2 mins on Scott Voltage FR

    nixon
    Member

    I podiumed twice in the same race….

    I summited every time I podiumed.

    prawny
    Member

    They did the comparison with 3 different bikes and three different bikes, results weren’t conclusive iirc but that was as FOD.

    Premier Icon kimbers
    Subscriber

    im pretty sure Im slower down cwmcarn DH on my 140mm am bike than on my 180mm freeride bike

    certainly as a rider Its harder work, after a few runs id be slower on the shorter travel bike, just through fatigue

    At antur, cwmcarn or any of the others maybe excepting FOD. I am damn sure I am faster on my 200mm DH bike than on the 140mm Bandit.
    If for no other reason then it gives me the confidence to beat the snot out of the bike and rag it through things.

    Sancho
    Member

    I like the confidence I get from my DH bike, but the enduro bike is generally quicker on UK tracks.

    however, I dont have a vast amount of experience to compare, however, the lads that race in my team are all looking at the enduro bikes and dare I say it 650b for the fastest option on a lot of the UK tracks.

    beicmynydd
    Member

    A lot depends on the tracks and to some extent the bike, some dh bikes pedal better than others, for example a carbon v10 or session will pedal better than my nukeproof scalp.

    Also depends on the rider I can ride the black runs at antur stiniog no problem on a dh bike but would be significantly slower on my spicy,

    Karl33to
    Member

    I quite often swap between a DH bike and a Hardtail on the same tracks, last time I went to BPW I took both and spent half a day on each.

    On smoother tracks that are still mostly downhill I don’t find there’s all that much difference in the two, usually the DH bike is fractionally slower than the HT, but it’s not by much, maybe only 5% in it.

    But on anything that’s rough or has jumps and drops in it the DH bike is much quicker – like 30% quicker.

    iolo
    Member

    When I raced dh I was shit on both my V10 and Enduro.
    My legs and arms took less of a pounding on rock gardens on the V10 so less arm pump.

    had a specialized status was great for a while untill i got bored of pushing up hill, now have an orange alpine which pedals up hill very well and is more fun and faster downhill too.

    status cost £1800, alpine cost just under 5k

    never ridden a 5k dh bike but can imagine it would be very good downhill.

    julians
    Member

    For the last day of an alps holiday last summer, I hired a specialized Status, but it felt heavy, slow and clumsy in comparison to my Mojo HD that I’d been riding for the previous 5 days.

    Maybe it was because it was my first ever time on a downhill bike, maybe its because I’m not capable enough to exploit the potential of a downhill bike, maybe its because the trails just suited the mojo better than the status. In reality its probably a combination of all three for me.

    No doubt though that a DH bike is faster in the right hands on the right trail.

    acehtn
    Member

    If the OP is thinking of chasing podiums and licence points for national ranking, taking DH racing a bit serious, then get a DH bike.

    Depending on variables of track-V-bike-V-rider then some gifted riders will do well on most bikes.

    In theory a DH bike will be built to take some serious abuse, and really need ragging hard.
    An Enduro bike, some are very capable at DH, and offer a very lively ride, and can feel more exciting as you are on and beyond it’s limits more than a DH race bike.
    An Enduro bike will deal with so much, but it will show the wear and tear faster as well.
    Saying that….. not uncommon to see snapped DH bikes, mostly of the very lightweight frame design.

    If just doing the odd DH race now and then, then if you only have an Enduro bike, few tweeks and race that 🙂

Viewing 42 posts - 1 through 42 (of 42 total)

The topic ‘How much quicker is a downhill rig?’ is closed to new replies.