How many of you are autistic?

Viewing 31 posts - 161 through 191 (of 191 total)
  • How many of you are autistic?
  • trumpton
    Member

    there’s many different anti depressants on offer so you should get better.

    Kuco
    Member

    TJ I will probably never get properly tested but would be interested if I had the chance to find out for sure as it would probably explain a lot.

    Premier Icon senor j
    Subscriber

    Just did roper’s “new” test on page 4.
    I got 204 ,professional assessment advised. I’ll catch up on the posts after that when I haven’t had a pint.
    🙂

    aweeshoe
    Member

    @senor j, wow! It’s interesting that on average asc women score higher than asc men in ropers “new” test

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/yuM96wAs4cJSo5C77

    Kuco
    Member

    roper’s test 187.

    Houns
    Member

    183 for me, some of the questions didn’t have a suitable answer for me to choose

    Kuco
    Member

    I also found that Houns.

    aweeshoe
    Member

    @senor j, @Kuco and @houns; my score on ropers test is 195, when I was formally assessed the psychiatrist said that my score was unusually high. If you’re experiencing difficulties with any aspect of your life it may be worth seeking a formal diagnosis as you might get access to certain services and support, some autistic people are entitled to PIP. However, I will add caution as there’s a lot of misperceptions of autism and you could receive detrimental treatment from friends, family and employers.

    Houns
    Member

    I have been diagnosed, but only initially, I couldn’t get funding for formal assessment by psychiatrist (I didn’t push this further as rather the funding go towards a child being assessed). I can still access any help needed via my gp

    Premier Icon senor j
    Subscriber

    “If I had a dick you would listen” ,this made me laugh.
    “could receive detrimental treatment from friends, family and employers.”
    I don’t think my employers would cope very well,as it is they leave me alone in a little dungeon.
    🙂

    aweeshoe
    Member

    @senor j I’ve just been given my own office, they call it the cell 😂 I’ve been given more autonomy along with it, basically my boss has realised I surpass their knowledge and my productivity has doubled without their assistance.

    I might even try asking for a raise again, the last time I was offered a demotion 😂

    I’m a mere borderline with 151 on that test.

    I’ve just been given my own office

    paradise

    what do you do for the day job?

    re: meds, if the meds aren’t helping or they make you feel odd (or worse) there are a ton of people with experience on here and some may share your condition, so its worth asking around, maybe a new thread would work. on a personal note, one of my family has been through a few different meds before settling on one with the best overall effect

    TiRed
    Member

    Roper’s test has a threshold below the mean for the neurotypicals. It is also pretty binary. Sensitivity and specificity looks modest. Having the suspected class makes that reasonable. Is scored as expected and commensurate with the previous test. there are plenty of others too. But then once yuo’ve done two, you will understand the nature of the questions. And yes, I am very sensitive to textures in clothing! Always have been. I also have sensitive hearing and speak softly.

    tjagain
    Member

    Interestingly I scored much lower on that test than on another I did – but a lot of the questions I really didn’t have an answer for. When you have a choice between “very” and “none” but my experience is “a bit” then its hard to answer.

    geex
    Member

    It’s a shit test.
    Each question is based on your own perception of yourself so if you go into it thinking you are autistic/have ASD traits you’re going to score higher.
    It even preps you for this in the sign up.
    Most questions are un answerable…
    Take the very first qusetion:
    “I am a sympathetic person?” 1)yes? 2)only as an adult? 3)only as a child? 4)Never?
    honestly? None of the above.
    pretty much all people are sympathetic on some level at some point in their lives. ASD or not. pre 16yrs old or not.
    Pretty much all people are NOT sypathetic 100% of their lives.
    The next question is even worse.
    “I often use words and phrases from movies and television in conversations”.
    Da actual fuq?

    scotroutes
    Member

    I just googled Ropers Test and couldn’t find an appropriate link.

    roper
    Member

    To clarify the test I posted is from a Aspergers/ASD organisation and is used in a generic basic introduction. Never rely on a simple test. ASD is a complex and quite variable lifelong condition which normally would be confirmed through a specialist multidisciplinary ASD team over a period time, taking into consideration, family interviews, childhood developement, school and teacher’s reports, sometimes physiotherapy assessment and several interviews and comunication tests.

    geex
    Member

    Yeah. I know.

    aweeshoe
    Member

    Although there’s limited scope to answering the questions in ropers test it’s more detailed than the official ones and it’s based upon the questions that the psychiatrist asks in the assessments. My assessment took 4hrs on 2 separate days and was by no means as intensive as it would have been if I was younger, I was expected to have developed coping strategies and not in need of any support services. In the assessment the psychiatrist wasn’t interested in the answers that much, they are only “traits” which are observable across several personality types but he paid a lot of attention to the way in which I moved, reacted and how I arrived at my answers which indicated my thought process. A lot of people think that autistic people have a “male brain” and empathy deficit, as Simon Baron-Cohen advocates. However his theory is unable to address a lot of queries about autism, I’d even go so far as to say it perpetrates detrimental myths. Gina Rippon is closer to a definitive description of as to how autism presents, by examining the neurology of the autistic brain rather than perceived traits

    aweeshoe
    Member

    paradise

    what do you do for the day job?

    @mrmonkfinger sorry I missed your post earlier. I work in a forestry nursery as a handpicker, a bit like a personal shopper for forestry and conservation projects. I spend most of my day out in the field, which is bliss, but the “shed” is busy with about 50-100 people in there. I’ve been given my own space to work in as I found that working amongst the others hindered me, I couldn’t concentrate with the noise and people kept moving my stuff 🧐

    I love my job (pay’s crap) and having my own space has allowed me to develop my role into something I find really interesting and rewarding

    aweeshoe
    Member

    I don’t want to use the thread as a personal blog, this story makes me feel uncomfortable enough but I do want to give an insight as to what it’s like being autistic and this is a good example as to the difficulties we can face.

    Agnosia is often a comorbid condition with autism, it’s the inability to recognise sensation in one’s self and others, such as emotion or expression. I find it difficult to distinguish whether or not I’m happy/sad, excited/nervous or angry/passionate, never mind figuring out what someone else is feeling, my kids know to use words but most adults don’t verbalise their feelings and so it’s difficult to interpret people’s intentions.

    Like many autistic people I don’t show emotions, unless they are extreme and come bursting out. So my default is friendly and chilled, I don’t treat anyone differently whether I’ve known them for days or minutes or if I’m comfortable or angry with them. This is often misinterpreted as too friendly or as being romantically interested in someone and can put me in a vulnerable position.

    I could use today as an example. At work I will speak to anyone, making a point of saying hello to my colleagues as I pass them. I have helped a few people when they have been in difficult situations, such as helping migrant staff find accommodation and I seem to be the “go to” for advice. However a colleague misconstrued my friendliness for availability, I’ve never said more than hello and smiled as I do to everyone. He doesn’t speak English so they decided to pictorialy describe what they would like to do to me whilst at work, I’m not payed enough for that shit.

    He’s employed by a subcontractor and I approached his boss and explained what had happened and how uncomfortable I felt. His immediate response was to blame me for being “too friendly” and that I should keep my distance, despite the fact we work at different sites and I’ve not even seen the guy for over a month. He then proceeded to give me advice on my personal safety, like not being alone in my office or out in the field. I walked away but he called me back, to tell me that I need to check my conduct. I asked the contractor if he thought that I was asking for it because my skirt was too short (I wear riggers, dickies oversized work trousers and my work provides me with t-shirts and fleeces that I could set up camp in)

    Thankfully my own (new) boss is a lot more understanding and professional, but now I have to go through a meeting and make a statement

    trumpton
    Member

    It’s world autism awareness week this week.

    nas

    aweeshoe
    Member

    We’re really quite lucky, we get the first week, the second day and the whole month of April 😀 every year! Makes me wonder why we need so much for people just to be aware of autism.

    This is often a difficult time for autistic people, as neurotypicals share their tragic stories of difficult kids and socially inept adults whom they’re sure must be on the spectrum because they’re a jerk, whilst raising money to provide respite for poor parents. If you listen to the language used, especially by Autism Speaks and associated charities it’s often quite negative or demeaning to the individual with autism. Awareness just means you know we exist, acceptance means that autistic people matter.</span>

    We’ve still a long way to go when people are still speaking for us rather than with us

    aweeshoe
    Member

    Aye, totally tj. It’s not just the pity though, autism has become a massive profit generator with so many professionals employed in “support” services. Yet only 16%of autistic adults are employed

    aweeshoe
    Member

    Dr Sarah Bargeila has conducted research into the gender gap in diagnosis and the implications for those affected. As part of her study she interviewed women with a late diagnosis to find out how it has affected them “… the reward for trying hard to be normal was to be ignored…”

    There’s a link in the article to her research

    https://www.refinery29.com/en-gb/autism-young-women

    I love my job (pay’s crap) and having my own space has allowed me to develop my role into something I find really interesting and rewarding

    Sounds cool!

    Shame you then have to put up with the rubbish in the following post. Best of luck with sorting that.

    aweeshoe
    Member

    Thanks @mrmonkfinger, I’ve had a meeting and I’m awaiting the outcome. I’ve said that I don’t want to see him fired but I want him kept well away from me and any other women or vulnerable people.

    My autism is often weaponised against me so I have prepared a few arguments to counter them. People often use autism as an excuse to treat people negatively, it’s amazing how many people assume that autistic people don’t experience feelings or emotions just because we don’t know how to read or express them. Whereas we often experience them more intensely, hence meltdowns and shutdowns

    aweeshoe
    Member

    One question I’ve always asked myself is what is it I do that’s different to others?

    I guess this research partially addresses why gp’s are reluctant to treat autistic people with depression without 24hr supervision

    In autism, depression takes on unusual forms

    aweeshoe
    Member

    How would you describe your friends? Perhaps individual, intelligent, sensitive, independent or talented.

    How would you describe autistic people? People are likely to say they are different, gifted, weird, awkward or special.

    The DSM-5, which is used to define symptoms and diagnose diseases uses the following words to describe autism:-

    Deficit x 9

    Impairment x 8

    Abnormal x 4

    Difficulties x 3

    Unusual x 3

    Failure x 2

    Poorly integrated x 1

    Lack x 1

    Absence x 1

    Disturbance x 1

    The language we use matters, it influences how others receive us and how we perceive ourselves. The words often chosen to describe autistic people are divisory and derogatory, which is a reflection on how we are viewed by friends, family and colleagues. These influences are also displayed in how autistic people are treated differently, whilst perhaps stemming from good intentions can be massively detrimental to the individual

    aweeshoe
    Member

    The Department of Health (England) are reviewing their Autism Strategy and are looking for autistic people, c<span style=”font-size: 0.8rem;”>arers, families and professionals to provide some input</span>

    https://consultations.dh.gov.uk/autism/2e4ae18d/

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