Horizontal dropouts. Is the wee screw thing a safety feature?

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  • Horizontal dropouts. Is the wee screw thing a safety feature?
  • tpbiker
    Member

    Got myself a tt bike which comes with horizontal dropouts. With the wheel/tyre combo supplied the axle slides in all the way to the end of the dropout, but with larger tyres I need to pull the axle about a cm back in the slot so the tyre doesn’t hit the seat tube.

    The issue is that one of the little screws In the dropout has seized so I can’t brace the axle against the screw when I tighten the qr. Makes insertion of wheel a bit fidly but once on it seems to work. What’s the likelihood the axle may slip without the screw on place however?

    Ta

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Subscriber

    I regard those things as positioning aids. You want the QR to be good enough to keep the wheel located without them for the sake of the rigidity of the back end.

    Premier Icon Rubber_Buccaneer
    Subscriber

    Drive side I’d say high non drive side low.  Bolted rather than QR would be OK I think

    tpbiker
    Member

    Got of bodging and I managed to fashion a tool to release it. It wasn’t as seized as I thought.

    The wee screw won’t go back in now however, although a similar sized one will go on from the other side of the drop out, which seems to do the job.

    The perils of buying an old bike..nothing fits or works properly. Half the bike is now held together with coke can shims..

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    Ah, my old Genesis ss has those, I fashioned new ones from a thread on here years ago.
    Frame has a nasty dent in the top tube where the old adjusters upset me and I threw it across the garage 😳

    tpbiker
    Member

    Next bodge question incoming…

    The rear wheel has a bit of play in it, it’s not the bearing or freehub, it appears there is a miniscule amount of play between the bearing race/cup and the bearing itself. Trouble is a miniscule amount of play at hub equals a good few mm of play at the rim when you grab it and give it a waggle from side to side.

    The solution..to take out the play by putting a a bit of coke can shim between hub and bearing. Not all way round, just a tiny bit at one side of bearing to take out the play. It seems to work a treat and wheel spins as smoothly as ever. But am I going to cause further damage with this bodge by further ruining the bearing cups? Can’t think of any other way to make the bearing a tighter fit.

    It’s an old disk wheel, parts aren’t available, so the option is leave as is, shim, or replace.

    Premier Icon Rubber_Buccaneer
    Subscriber

    am I going to cause further damage with this bodge

    What you have there is a shonky old bodged up death trap of a bike.  I don’t think you can do any further harm, carry on 🙂

    tpbiker
    Member

    That’s what I though!

    To be fair now I’ve sorted the drop out nothing is going to be unsafe…hopefully. it actually feels pretty solid. For now.

    kerley
    Member

    I regard those things as positioning aids. You want the QR to be good enough to keep the wheel located without them for the sake of the rigidity of the back end.

    Agree, have always found them useful until I need to get wheel out and have to undo them.

    Premier Icon tthew
    Subscriber

    The wee screw won’t go back in now however, although a similar sized one will go on from the other side of the drop out

    Get a long screw, and screw it right through from the direction it will go to clean up the threads. A little hacksaw cut in the tip of the screw would help as a bit of a cutting edge. A tap would be even better, but maybe unlikely you have one of those.

    trail_rat
    Member

    Loctite bearing fit the bearing to the hub

    I regard those things as positioning aids. You want the QR to be good enough to keep the wheel located without them for the sake of the rigidity of the back end.

    Yes, because if your axle doesn’t grip well enough, they snap as they’re not strong enough I know this from experience on my Last Fastforward.

    tpbiker
    Member

    Loctite bearing fit the bearing to the hub

    Brilliant idea..I’ll give that shot. Not sure how easy it’ll be to ever remove the bearing in future but I’ll worry about that a later date

    trail_rat
    Member

    Use real Bearing fit , light heat and a knock it’ll come out.

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