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  • Home Page – Do you reckon there will be electric gears in your future one day?
  • stratobiker
    Member

    There already was. Mavic did some years ago….for road bikes.

    Premier Icon Wookster
    Subscriber

    Tried it on a TT at my LBS I really liked it shifted fast and seemed very intuitive very temped for next road bike when funds allow…so 2020 then!!! 😆

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Subscriber

    So you’ll be voting for this option then “Yes! I can’t wait for technology to catch up off road!”

    crikey
    Member

    Hmm, but Mavic never tested it in Bolton. In November.

    The new Ultegra is excellent, saving up for it now.

    dirtyrider
    Member

    already got di2 on my mtb

    _tom_
    Member

    I’ll have it when its cheap and reliable/strong enough to be a viable option for me. I love the idea of never having to adjust my gears again.

    bm0p700f
    Member

    Since cables work well for me and are lot cheaper I cannot see the point unless you are a competitive racer. Also for me I would forget to charge the battery and end up in one gear on ride, probably a really tall one when hitting a big hill. Also cable systems are alot cheaper to fix when they go wrong.

    I’m sticking to cables until cable systems are no longer sold.

    cynic-al
    Member

    Argued at medium length on a thread in the last day or 2.

    I’d like to try It…won’t buy till it’s affordable.

    It seems to have many advantages over cables.

    crikey
    Member

    Current prices for shifters, derailleurs and battery pack for Ultegra Di2 as an upgrade are coming in at about £1000.

    It’s a dear do, but folk will spend that on a pair of deep section wheels without thinking, and this is way better in terms of performance and bragging rights.

    Premier Icon mogrim
    Subscriber

    Thing is, I like the fettling bit of owning a bike. Mind you, if someone wants to give me a TT bike with DI2 on it, I won’t say no 🙂

    mrmo
    Member

    i can see it becoming normal within a few years for most mid/higher end bikes on and off road. Will i buy it? not yet as i can’t afford the current options, but i don’t see a problem.

    ontor
    Member

    Most definitely not. Not till it’s wirelesss, self-charging and contained within a decent 11-14 speed hub gear.

    Till it’s wireless I really don’t see the point. Cables are light, strong, simple and work very well. Solution in search of problem, again.

    rp16v
    Member

    why change a tried and tested design no need for it if u ask me.
    as mentioned i enjoy the fettling if it keeps going like this mechanics will be exempt and ul take your bike to a IT center.

    wingnuts
    Member

    Rode a road bike with the Ultegra stuff on a couple of weeks ago. It was a revalation. No doubt it is the future. I normally ride dura ace and would have swopped there and then.

    Those who’ve ridden it long term round here report no issues with battery life or reliability.

    Understand the wireless point but is that going to be a realality with the number of frequencies that would be needed in a road bunch?

    I think the potential is even greater off road and they are already playing with an electric hub. This is where I would make my first buys I think.

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    Even the shimano press officer sees this as being difficult for mountainbikes. Its very testing environment. Waterproofing and crashing. Robustness and reliability

    For me – solution in search of a problem and KISS

    fasthaggis
    Member

    @ontar
    Yup, I am going to wait for the wireless,solar charged one(with the optional mind control connection ).
    😀

    stevious
    Member

    Di2 looks awesome for road bikes, the auto-trim feature would make my life 83% better.

    For it to be practical for mountain bikes, I think it would have to be easily bodgeable on the trailside after a rock has had it’s way with it.

    I also think it needs AM/FM radio and a red LED clock.

    Pigface
    Member

    In a word, no.

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    It’ll be great – the road stuff is pretty much universally loved

    I’m slightly reassured that they’re not rushing it out for mtbs

    (If it’s more precise, they could squeeze in an extra sprocket or two as well 😉 )

    clubber
    Member

    I don’t think the waterproofing is an issue TJ – it’s been holding up just fine on the road which is bad for spray, etc.

    Robustness might be a concern but then current mechs aren’t really all that tough either.

    I’ve tried it, it’s great but too expensive for me so I’ll be waiting until it’s available at XT or maybe XTR prices.

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    The environment on the road is nothing like as harsh as mountainbiking.

    jamesco
    Member

    If the tenet of the original post was – do each of us personally see e-gears in our future – then for me it’s a yes , each rider has their own choice , no need to rubbish the idea as in the ‘uppy downy’ seat post threads. The shimano line about reliability etc is just playing for time I reckon, e-gearing and controls are used in much harsher environments than MTBing ,it’s more a pricing issue , TJ a crash is a crash and e-gears will not fare any worse than cabled in a really bad mash up, if the mech hanger snaps it snaps either way, indexing aint the problem, it’ll be easier. Dons tin hat and waits for incomig…

    clubber
    Member

    proof TJ? you’ll note I only commented on waterproofing.

    jamesco
    Member

    I think you may be missing the point TJ the harshness of the MTB environment will be just the same for the cassette chain and derailleur, but it will be better without the cables and fittings.

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    Rather harsher environment than road.
    06 guy swamp by TandemJeremy, on Flickr

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    The environment on the road is nothing like as harsh as mountainbiking.

    Water is water, there’s no more of it off road than on. Pro Tour bikes are generally jet washed daily, it wouldn’t work if it wasn’t waterproof. Also whilst mechs are more susceptible to rocks on an MTB, mass pile ups on the road tend to destroy mechs (which have a crash protection feature to disengage them from the servos to protects against damage) en masse. I think folk are really overstating the ‘it’s not tough enough for MTBs’ thing.

    I’d have it, off and on road today.

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    Jamesco – No I am not missing the point. Complex electro mechanical systems and the harshness of the mountainbiking environment are not a good mix. The mud in that puddle above would / did have the mech completely submerged in fine abrasive acid mud. How abouthe clay mud of the south gumming up the works preventing it from moving? what about when you bend it in a crash?

    clubber
    Member

    anecdote not proof. Go on TJ admit you don’t have any which by your own standards makes you wrong 😉

    Actually, don’t bother – we all know you’ve made your mind up you old reactionary, you 🙂

    again, waterproofing is what I mentioned.

    ti_pin_man
    Member

    It’s coming, prices will fall as always. You will all have it in a few years.

    smell_it
    Member

    I’m just waiting for the road frame I want to stick it on, and I can’t wait! I’m pretty sure it won’t make a jot of difference to my times. For mtb use, i’ll reserve comment, i’m sure there will be plenty of fuel to power tj’s i’mrightathon.

    jamesco
    Member

    …..and for that reason I’m out. Off to start a new thread.

    clubber
    Member

    Complex electro mechanical systems and the
    harshness of the mountainbiking environment
    are not a good mix. The mud in that puddle
    above would / did have the mech completely
    submerged in fine abrasive acid mud. How
    abouthe clay mud of the south gumming up the
    works preventing it from moving?

    of course they’re all valid concerns and you *could* be right but again you don’t know. You just want it not to work. We’ll see soon enough.

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    Its not that I don’t want it to work – its I see significant problems with it.

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    Significant theoretical problems.

    And you say what happens when you bend it, what happens when you bend a normal mech? Di2 ones are less fragile because of their ability to detatch themselves from the servos, there’s in built crash protection that a cable pulled mech doesn’t have.

    clubber
    Member

    Maybe I’m misjudging you tj but I just don’t believe you though I don’t think it’s anything you’re doing consciously.

    As I said I have the same concerns since they’re the obvious ones to have but then current gear systems are far from perfect too. And incidentally many of the less open minded roadies claimed it’d never work on the road for similar reasons.

    reggiegasket
    Member

    the price will definitely come down – if you think about the pricing then:

    – the Di2 mechs are clearly more complex than the mechanical ones, with the motors built in, so it’s reasonable that they should be more £
    – the STI may well be simpler than the mechanical versions, as they have switches rather than ratchets, so could easily be no more expensive.
    – you have a battery, which obviously costs a bit but not silly money
    – and a few cables, which cost very little

    so, it’s reasonable to think the Di2 prices won’t be much more than the equivalent mechanical prices, after a few years. Hopefully.

    avdave2
    Member

    I’d like lighter hub gears first and then electronic shifting.

    IanMunro
    Member

    I agree with TJ.
    One thing with the current mechanical system is that when crap gets in it, it carries on working, just not as well as you’d want. Whereas with electronics it’s going to be a bit all or nothing.
    Having said that Shimano aren’t stupid.

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    I have no idea what the current roadie models involve, but 2 opposing motors and no return spring could lead to fundamental redesign of the mech, allowing better mud room etc

    TimothyD
    Member

    Cables seem greener to me, if you use Green Oil’s lube on the cables and housings and look after the cables, they can last for ages and be easily recycled when they’re knackered. Friction cable gears for me because things can get bent and still be mostly usable.

    Campag’s road gears seem robust with them being tested under water, but I still think cables are greener which seems to fit in with cycling more for me.

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