hip replacement/riding afterwards

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  • hip replacement/riding afterwards
  • whitestone
    Member

    I had my hip (full replacement) done 3 1/2 years ago. I was out of hospital 30hrs after walking in. Out and about within a couple of weeks, I had the operation in late November so a lot was weather dependent. Was on the turbo after six weeks, could probably have started sooner but my wife I insisted that I wait until the surgeon gave the go-ahead. That took me to early/mid January. Once there wasn’t a risk of frost/ice I began doing easy road rides on the flat – basically going up and down upper Wharfedale. Built up from there. Ended up doing over 10,000Km that year.

    I’m quite happy with multi-day ITT rides so you could say it’s been a success. If the other hip started playing up and they suggested it needed being replaced then I’d sign the forms there and then.

    Premier Icon ton
    Subscriber

    that all sounds promising mate. getting over the ankle has been a bastard. hopefully the hip will prove easier.

    cheers

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    I broke my hip and had it pinned (at 35) – recovery was about 3-6 months with some longer term stretching etc to get full strength. I was told that a replacement is actually a lot less intrusive in terms of the operation size and the healing time is quicker as there’s no broken bones to knit.

    whitestone
    Member

    I have to admit that I was a bit shocked when the surgeon said “You’ll be home within a day of the op” – I think it’s because you are used to the potential infections at home rather than the novel ones you’d be exposed to in hospital plus being home will always make you feel like you are on the mend. Our 80yr old neighbour had her hip done and was back home in three days.

    Anyway – YGM.

    Premier Icon ton
    Subscriber

    seeing the consultant next week, regarding a hip replacement.

    how is your riding after a replacement. how soon back on bike.

    this is part of a total body replacement, new heart, sorted, new ankle, sorted, new hip, planned…….. ๐Ÿ˜†

    Premier Icon ahsat
    Subscriber

    My Mum has had two full hip replacements in her late 50s. She has some additional medical complications but it went very well. The main thing is waiting for the surgeon to be confident it won’t dislocate and the main risk is falls. They like cycling but from her experience I think you might be looking at turbo from week 6 and outdoors from weeks 10-12. It has turned my Mums life round. Are you having it done at Chapel A ton? Mum had both hers done there and they were great.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    I was going to post basically what wwaswas did. I cycle because I broke my hip, I got into it for rehab. As I understand it the traction-in-situ surgery is weirdly more initially damaging and debilitating than a replacement, but the longer term prognosis is better (mine should be done-and-dusted, replacements wear out)

    sargey
    Member

    I had a hip resurfacing 7 years ago ( aged 50) but waited 3 months before cycling because of winter weather.
    It’s been good so far.

    shermer75
    Member

    There’s a fairly rigid protocol to follow with total hip replacememt but that only restricts certain movements for the first couple of weeks- I *think* it’s no bending your hip more than 90 degrees and no moving you leg past your centreline (as in crossing your legs). Other than that they will have you on your feet pretty much as soon as you wake up and prob out the hospital that day or the next. Current evidence shows that the earlier you mobilise (ie get up and start walking around) the higher the chances of success. You’ll be visited by a physio after you wake up, they will give you excellent advice, ask them plenty of questions and have someone with you if you can to help you remember the answers! Good luck!! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Premier Icon Trekster
    Subscriber

    Tues night riding buddie has had both done, rides a Mondracker ebike now…..
    He used to live here! http://www.crathorne.org/crathorne-hall-hotel/4551019945
    Know it?

    Premier Icon duncancallum
    Subscriber

    Ton

    I had a hip replacement at 30.

    Best thing ever.

    Email me fella or we can meet up. It’s a long tail…

    You at dyfi?

    Premier Icon Scapegoat
    Subscriber

    I had a total hip replacement ten weeks ago. I was out of hospital and walking g with a single stick in a couple of days, and by day ten could walk on a flattish track for about a mile without sticks.

    The only real bugbear is the not bending your hip past 90 degrees thing. They used to say about six weeks but current thinking is not to bend it for twelve weeks. Apparently the risk of dislocation is very real. My occupational therapist was very insistent when i suggested getting on the turbo, as the pedalling can be an issue.

    That said, apart from the cycling i haven’t looked back since about two weeks after the op. The less you favour it the better it works.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    My dad had is done nearly 2 years ago not a cyclist but a very active 60 something farmer. The rapid recovery and feeling he was able to do more did mean he pushed himself quite hard which was going well until he fell at 7-8 weeks and broke the leg with the replacement in – this is very much not recommended!!
    However even after that he is much better than before the first op and the impact of the hip on back etc. was a major issue before.

    Premier Icon Bunnyhop
    Subscriber

    My advice – find the best surgeon you can, for you are an active, young patient.

    Recovery is quick and easy if you follow advice. Too many people don’t do the physio exercises after surgery and a few push themselves too hard.
    As mentioned above the worry is dislocation. There is only gravity holding the new joint in place, therefore building up muscle is crucial.

    I was advised not to mtb, but that was the worry of falling. After a few months I was back on my mtbike but walking down stuff (that I’d ridden a 100 times).
    18 months later I’m back mtbing properly, padded up and not bothered about getting off on any downhills. Padded up now with a cautious approach allows me to carry on the sport I love.
    Watching the Martyn Ashton video made me realise I would carry on and take a chance.
    The replacement only lasts 20 years, so get good advice. Mine is not ceramic, because I ski and cycle and that type of ball join could break with a bad fall.

    You should get lots of advice and leaflets, also great advice from the other posters above.

    Edit: I was advised by the surgeon to swim breast stroke 7 days a week. I managed at least 4-5. Please ask about the swimming because its not something that other surgeons agree on.

    robbo
    Member

    Good luck ton. I had mine replaced five years ago. I lost lots of strength because I was ‘hipless’ for 6 months while the infection cleared, but I was back on the bike within 6 weeks and back at work teaching in 6 weeks. Took over a year to get the power even between the legs again.

    Get down the gym and on the machines as quickly as you can. Walking in water is a very good early exercise to get going.

    The only advice the doctors gave me was to not try to learn anything new (like skiing, para gliding) where there is a high fall risk – they said If I used to be fine then it would be ok. I’ve taken a few falls including being hit by a VW Golf at speed and not had any issues.

    My advice is to do as much strength work before the op so that you are as strong and fit as you can be to make recovery quicker.

    I now hardly notice it!

    Premier Icon Bunnyhop
    Subscriber

    Good advice robbo.

    I would walk as much as you can and swim. Get your fitness as high as possible, as robbo says, it will help with a quick and easy recovery.

    Premier Icon shadowrider
    Subscriber

    Im having mine replaced on friday. Ive been waiting for about a year to get it done and i really cant wait, short term pain for long term gain (hopefully). My surgeon said he’d be happy for me to get on a stationary bike after 12 weeks if i heal ok. Still cant decide whether to have it done under general anaesthetic or while awake.

    whitestone
    Member

    Still cant decide whether to have it done under general anaesthetic or while awake.

    I went in insistent that I’d have a general anaesthetic rather than an epidural but the anaesthetist was pretty persuasive and I had an epidural. I still insisted on being put under though – I came to about two thirds of the way through the op. It sounded like the seven dwarves at work hammering away on the other side of the curtain ๐Ÿ˜†

    Like Robbo, I hardly notice it now. I’ve only fallen on it once, about a month ago I hit some ice – things hurt for a week or so.

    Anyway Shadowrider, good luck. Follow the regimen they give you but push it a bit so long as you don’t induce pain. Whenever I spoke to someone who’d had the op they’d recommend having it done. I totally understand now, it’s a complete life changer, I’ve gone from being in tears when getting out of bed to walking normally and happy to ride a bike off-road for 18hrs. You won’t regret it.

    Ramsey Neil
    Member

    Very interested in this thread . Just had a consultation today and 6 to 8 month wait and the cheerful advice that by the time I have it done my other hip will be just about ready for replacement too. Was thinking of going private but not keen to spend ยฃ13k+ and have to do it again next year . Quite like the idea af a resurfacing but that’s a private only option and it seems that there can be issues .

    Premier Icon shadowrider
    Subscriber

    Well i had mine replaced on Friday morning, i had a spinal block with no sedative. It was very surreal as you can hear everything, a lot of hammering, drilling and sawing, but could only feel the movements in your bones. The worst part was when they lowered the screen when they finished and the surgeon gave me the thumbs up while completely splattered in blood, like a scene from a horror film. But im up and about on crutches now but very sore and stiff. Cant wait to get on my bike again.

    Premier Icon Bunnyhop
    Subscriber

    Congratulations.
    Now it’s doing everything you’re told. Don’t get on a turbo too soon (because you mustn’t bend at the hip).
    Rest because it is a major op and let us know your progress ๐Ÿ™‚

    Premier Icon duncancallum
    Subscriber

    go easy and do not cross your legs…

    I found sleeping sitting up helped

    Premier Icon shadowrider
    Subscriber

    Well today has been a good day. 39 days after having my new hip i had my first ride on an exercise bike. It felt really good to get my legs spinning again especially as there was no nagging groin pain, in fact there was no pain at all.

    Premier Icon ton
    Subscriber

    got my date for this. going in on 23rd november. and hopefully home on the 25th, fingers crossed.

    looking for a good turbo trainer for when i am able to use it…. ๐Ÿ˜†

    Good luck, this is something I will be looking at down the road.
    Any updates shadowrider? Hope its all going ok.

    shermer75
    Member

    Great news and good luck!!

    Premier Icon chipster
    Subscriber

    Good luck, Big ‘un, hope all goes well.

    Premier Icon shadowrider
    Subscriber

    I’ve had mine nearly 6 months now, it’s amazing how much difference it’s made. I’m not doing any mtbing as I’m too worried about falling off but I’m on the roadbike nearly everyday. Just got myself a Cannondale Slate so I can do a bit more than just road riding.
    Being allowed home in 2 days might be a bit optimistic, I was out on the 4th day, it all depends on passing all the little goals they set you. I hope it all goes well mate.

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    ton wrote:

    looking for a good turbo trainer for when i am able to use it….

    You can’t really use that in a flat….. ๐Ÿ™„

    Good luck Tony!

    Ramsey Neil
    Member

    Had mine resurfaced in June and so far it’s been a great success . Was back at work 4 and a bit weeks after the op and have done some road cycling on the MTB and some very light off road tracks . The recovery for resurfacing is a little different because they mill the ball down a bit and then put a crown on it rather like they do with a tooth . This leaves the bone under the crown soft and it can take a year to fully harden back to what it was so femoral head fractures are a worry if you overdo it . For active people it seems like a better choice as standard replacements tend to last under 10 years in people who are under 60 and active , also the risk of dislocation is minimised as the ball and socket are larger with a resurfacing . That operation is not an option on the NHS on the Isle of Man and probably not in the UK . They always tell you to choose your surgeon well if you have a choice , mine had done over 3000 resurfacings with 97% still functioning well. Certainly hip replacement or resurfacing are life changing operations for many and are considered fairly routine in this day and age . Good luck with yours .

    Premier Icon ton
    Subscriber

    everyone seems to have had a good outcome from hip operations.
    fingers crossed it will all be good.

    ski
    Member

    Had the results of my MRI scan yesterday and looks like I will be going down this path soon too.

    Interested in ages that everyone here had the opp, as I am only 48, not looking forward to the thought of time off a bike.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    Friend had his done, was riding within a couple of months and back racing DH competitively within a year.

    whitestone
    Member

    @ski – I was 54 when I had mine done.

    It’s a very routine operation these days, over 70,000 per year in the UK. The hospital where I had mine done perform 3 a day.

    Anyway good luck Tony.

    tjagain
    Member

    Aye – in the vast majority of cases hip replacements work very well. My 82 yr old mother had both hips done last year. 3 months after the second one she was walking 5 miles with no issues.

    another friend in her 40s had one done and within 3 months was back to playing tennis.

    The key to good recovery is to do the exercises they give you religiously

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    What if you are an atheist?

    tjagain
    Member
    Premier Icon ton
    Subscriber

    looking for a bit of advice/help.

    had the op 13 days ago. it was a success. i was out of bed after 4 hours, which was a shock. up some stairs later that night, and sent home next morning. all very rushed.

    after care advice was a bit crap. obviously they told me, not to cross my legs, no low seat to be used, sleep on my back. obvious stuff.

    but then it was just, off you go kind of thing, dont do too much.
    but how much is too much?, how painful should walking on it be?
    i dont think there is pain in the joint now, but there is deffo a lot of pain when walking, shuffleing about my bed, and even seating, tho i think this will be pain from the scar/bruising?

    i have built my walks up a bit each day, and today managed 1 mile. is it too far?

    anyone?

    Premier Icon rilem
    Subscriber

    My experiences – I walked a mile 2 weeks after the op, you are probably correct that the pain is the scar / bruising.

    Getting onto an indoor bike and keeping the hip moving without impact is the best thing you can do.

    Have you been given any exercises to do? I am guessing that if it is the NHS it will be just a sheet of paper, but do them religiously. Once you get the go ahead (when the wound heals) work on the hip movement in a swimming pool. I still do this 2 years on after a swim session (one benefit of the op was that it forced me to learn freestyle swimming properly and I found I actually enjoyed swimming after 50 years.)

    I paid a sports physio to work on my rehab over several months and if you can afford this it is worth every penny, both for the actual manipulation of the joint and also for the psychological support – being told how far you can push things, is the pain anything to worry about etc.

    I was cycling after 12 weeks (could have been sooner but it was winter), cycled in Majorca after 16 weeks, did a loaded tour in Wales after 6 months, toured down the Divide after 9 months.

    I know several others who have had this done and it has given us all a new lease of life. Good luck.

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