Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
  • Highest lumen per £ offroad bike light?
  • Premier Icon lovewookie
    Full Member

    just pondering lights, as you do.

    What do you think would be the highest lumen per £ for a usable offroad light?

    If we take the bikehut 1600? 32 lumen/£ as a baseline in decent value for money, what comes close or much better?

    The vicmax A9 that torchy had a look at (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/9600lm-8-CREE-XM-L2-Front-MTB-Bike-Bicycle-Light-lamp-Headlight-Rechargeable-UK/123235013239?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649), 2731 lumen for about £45 (60.6 lumen/£)

    Magicshine 6500, torchy measured that at 6200lumen(!) for £230 makes for only 30 lumen/£…

    any contenders, not based on ebay lumens may I add.

    Premier Icon kimbers
    Full Member

    The prices of these fluctuate, I got mine for £15

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/HUAYUU%C2%AE2400Lumens-Rechargeable-Waterproof-Headlight-Taillight/dp/B07F6SXVFB/ref=asc_df_B07F6SXVFB/?

    Now it’s not 2400 lumens but it’s brighter than my Halfords 1000 lumen one

    Also quite well made & charge lasts ages

    I’m riding tonight will try & take a comparison pic

    Premier Icon stevied
    Full Member

    My 8000lm light cost me about £80 to make, £80 for a battery from Smudge.
    50 lumens per £ 🤩

    Premier Icon DezB
    Full Member

    This?

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    Is £/lumen a good measure?

    For a bar light where what you need is a massive flood that’s even over a very wide beam then maybe.

    But within a margin* for more expensive batteries or efficient LED’s it’s lumens / weight / run time, pick 2. Then cost / longevity pick 1.

    E.g. My helmet light is very good (but only 20 lumen/£), but I would concede that a Joystick is probably considerably better again (10 lumen/£).

    Or my dynamo setup on the commuter, 1.5 lumen/£ (about 300 lumen, and about £200 inc front rim and spokes)! But runs forever, zero faff, doesn’t piss other people off, lux is comparable to 1500 lumen bar lights (i.e. it’s not wasting 80% of the light on the hedge, sky, oncoming peoples eyes, front wheel etc).

    *you could get a few percent efficiency by spending more on LED’s, but doubling the battery weight adds 100% to the runtime, hence my comment that one is a marginal gain.

    Premier Icon Sui
    Free Member

    stevied

    Subscriber
    My 8000lm light cost me about £80 to make, £80 for a battery from Smudge.
    50 lumens per £ 🤩

    :yikes: do they not burn the retiners of all small (and large) animals on a ride..?

    Premier Icon benp1
    Full Member

    Agreed, cheap lumens aren’t always good. I’ve gone through two chinese lights. They both broke. One was the well regarded and cheap solarstorm X2, it died from being subjected to too much rain

    I had good batteries though, and they’re still good. Might get another cheap head for the kids to use as their bike light

    Premier Icon hooli
    Free Member

    I would think several solarstorm copies at £15 odd lined up on the bars and on your helmet would be the best lumen per £. Maybe not the most practical though.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    I would think several solarstorm copies at £15

    You would still need batteries that actually got anywhere near the stated capacity, and a charger that doesn’t burst into flames.

    And they weren’t a great beam pattern.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    As above it’s not all about lumens. Comparing a Lezyne 800 vs a Light and Motion 500, on full they are both similarly rideable and have similarly short runtimes – although the Lezyne is bigger.

    But the usability of the Lezyne falls off a cliff at the lower light outputs because it’s too floody. The L&M is a spot so it’s quite usable on dark roads even at 150lm, the lowest setting, whereas the Lezyne is hard to ride with in the same conditions even at 500lm.

    Premier Icon robj20
    Free Member

    My Holy Moses works out at 15/£, but give out a great usable light not just one intense spot which i found was common with some ultra cheap lights.

    Premier Icon lovewookie
    Full Member

    Agree, overall it’s not just about the output, but how the light is put together, battery quality etc, but even that can go wrong, take the Volt 6000, over 6000 lumen, but too much light reflected back meant that relatively speaking everything around seems dark.

    This was me ust wondering..:-)

    Premier Icon singletrackmind
    Full Member

    I think the winner will be a multi xhp 70.2 set up, running off 26650 batteries.
    You should be able to get over 100lumen pr £
    Even a single will be around the 80 lum mark

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    With my Halfords 1600 the beam is spotty which is great except on 1600 where the spot is actually too bright. So the 1600 setting isn’t needed in the least!

    Premier Icon lovewookie
    Full Member

    With my Halfords 1600 the beam is spotty which is great except on 1600 where the spot is actually too bright. So the 1600 setting isn’t needed in the least!

    I have to confess, I tend to run my 1600 on the 2nd click (about 800-1000 ish?) when paired with my helmet light.

    Premier Icon P-Jay
    Full Member

    I’ve got a “10,000lm” bar light that cost £25. So theoretically 400Lm/£.

    Sadly it’s not really 10k Lm, although it is very bright, it’s also completely useless.

    Premier Icon bartimaeus
    Free Member

    I have a couple of 501b XM-L2 torches similar to this one… they were under £8 when I got them. They usually claim 1000 or so lumens, but this one says 1770 which is not even theoretically possible.

    My torches run at about 2.5 amps on HI and a very handy 0.9 amps on MED which should give about 800 lumens on HI and just under 400 lumens on MED (according to https://flashlightwiki.com/Cree#XM-L2). Having tested these torches couple of different 900 lumen lights (e.g. Cateye) the numbers seems about right, though the more expensive lights have more pleasing beams.

    You do have to buy mounts (about £2) and a charger for the 18650s, but you can use old laptop cells which are ‘free’… though the shorter unprotected 18650s realy need a spacer magnet to keep them snug.

    https://gb.lightmalls.com/ultrafire-wf-501b-cree-xm-l2-5-modes-led-flashlight-torch-1-18650?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIxpnSgI6h5gIVSrDtCh374w66EAQYAiABEgJq1fD_BwE

    Premier Icon malv173
    Full Member

    @DezB: The picture of that Amazon Wasaga light being used as a head torch is priceless! It’s massive! What lunatic would use one like that? 🤣🤣🤣

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