Heating Oil Tank Installation

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  • Heating Oil Tank Installation
  • large418
    Member

    I would do it in copper – plastic pipe may be approved (I have no idea if they are or not), but a crushed/cracked plastic pipe will leak all your oil away, whereas a crushed or bent copper pipe will still not leak.

    You can get a load of plastic coated 10mm copper pipe for not that much compared to the cleanup costs of a split plastic pipe!

    Premier Icon smartay
    Subscriber

    Hi All

    Does the oil feed pipe from the tank to boiler need to be in copper with threaded fittings or is there an alternative these days, no pressure just head of tank to pump

    trail_rat
    Member

    Mines 10mm plastic coated copper with compression fittings

    trail_rat
    Member

    Copper pipe can crack if bent too much as well , infact ime splits easier than plastic pipe as its more flexible encouraging ambitious bends….

    Premier Icon smartay
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    Thinking of running combination of 15mm down 10 mm due to the length of run 30ish Ft, tank to boiler

    large418
    Member

    But the copper pipe is likely to crack on installation, not when the car/trailer/kids bike etc collides with it. It’s after the installation I would be worried about the pipe cracking. 10mm pipe would be fine throughout, after all, the flow rate is (hopefully) quite low.

    Use compression fittings, and you may need some oil resistant tape (it’s like plumbing PTFE tape, but oil resistant)

    Premier Icon smartay
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    Would hydraulic lock, thread sealent be ok. We use this in work on standard oil piping so I presume this would be the same as heating oil/ kerosene

    Premier Icon Alphabet
    Subscriber

    We’ve just had a new line fitted last week from the tank to the boiler. Our heating chap used plastic coated copper. It looks about 10mm.

    Premier Icon smartay
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    Ok thanks for the above info, however, will have to bury part of the supply pipe.

    Oftec info only says consult with installation team etc, what have they done in your case, I was going to pass copper pipe through hose for additional protection prior to back filling

    b r
    Member

    Oftec info only says consult with installation team etc, what have they done in your case, I was going to pass copper pipe through hose for additional protection prior to back filling

    The line from our oil tank to house is partial underground (just covered with soil as I found out…), and then attached to the wall.

    It looks 10mm copper with a plastic (not sure what) covering.

    I’d guess it’s to a specific spec, so just buy whatever is required.

    A simple google brought this up:

    http://www.oftec.org/Media/Default/DocGalleries/Home%20guides/OFTEC%20Home%20Guide%20Domestic%20Oil%20Supply%20Pipes%20PUB21.pdf

    Premier Icon smartay
    Subscriber

    Thanks b r couldn’t find that page of info, will ring local plumbers merchant about the plastic coated piping, however,one of my neighbours recently had there tank replaced and relocated but has been done in standard 10mm copper with screw fitting on every corner- carried out by registered installer

    b r
    Member

    tbh Now I’ve found out that ours (inherited) isn’t shielded in any way and just been covered with earth I’ll be protecting it.

    One of our neighbours had a leak (into the wall), they only found out when it started showing through the plaster – big insurance job as not only loads of oil but they needed to dismantle about 10ft of house wall (3ft thick stone job too).

    So I’d err on over-build myself.

    Premier Icon smartay
    Subscriber

    Ok, cleared the area for sighting of tank, so before I start lets see your installations, preferably with buried supply pipe under walkways

    redben
    Member

    As a plumber I always use plastic coated 10mm copper, its pretty much standard practice for oil lines. ( do not use 15mm pipe as it will bring potentially more problems)
    If you are going to use compression fittings then you need brass inserts to stop the pipe from deforming too much when tightening the fitting. (All compression fittings need to be accessible)

    For sealing both the threaded tank connection and the compression fittings I would recommend either Heldite or Stag jointing compound.

    I work with oil appliances day in and day out and 9 times out of 10 any leaks with regards to pipework are from mechanical damage.

    Hope that helps 🙂

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    Redben

    The plastic coated pipe, qualpipe, on there web site says it isn’t I’ve stable and only suitable for burying. This will mean starting in standard copper going to plastic, under the path and then returning to copper for the rest of the run

    redben
    Member

    Erm I would try going to another stockist to get conventional plastic coated copper pipe then, because it will not only be easier to run if its one continuous pipe but also it means the chances of leaking joints in dramatically reduced 🙂

    You need part number 8883
    http://www.bes.co.uk/products/139.asp Part

    Premier Icon smartay
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    What this like to bend, using hand bender for most angles rather than fittings, does it need internal ferrules

    trail_rat
    Member

    I just did bending by hand putting in big radius curves

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