• This topic has 25 replies, 19 voices, and was last updated 1 week ago by boblo.
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  • Hearing aids
  • shoko
    Full Member

    Had a consultant appointment at ENT the other day and it seems that I require hearing aids to stop missing out on half of the noise around me!

    Anyone ride with hearing aids? Any tips?

    58 and falling to bits 😞

    the-muffin-man
    Full Member

    I’m 55 and have worn one for nearly 20 years now. So I fell to bits a long time ago. 🤣

    Main tip – get one and use it! Don’t just pop it in when you think you need it. Mine goes in when I get dressed and only comes out when I go to bed.

    …and you still won’t heat owt in pubs.

    And NHS ones are fine – can’t see the point of spending £1000s. And you can get NHS ones through Specsavers etc.

    longdog
    Free Member

    54 and also falling apart. I’m waiting for an appointment with audiology after a test at Specsavers where they said I have considerable conductive hearing loss in one ear. Got a letter to say my appointment could be upto 52 weeks away 🤣

    The other ear I already knew I had hearing loss from damage. I cat hear any high sounds like a watch alarm plus other general loss.

    By the way not all Specsavers do NHS work, the ones where i am in Scotland dont. Their hearing aids worth having seem serious money to me. Especially if you need two.

    Noisy places are a nightmare for me and I struggle to tell the direction of noises which is a pain on the bike.

    littledave
    Free Member

    I have worn hearing aids for almost 50 years, making me feel old now….

    One tip is  to try wearing a headband to reduce wind noise. Modern aids are much better in wind but still not perfect.

    Noisy, complex environments are a pain.

    I have both NHS and private aids, mainly use the private ones as they are rechargeable. They are also waterproof which is very handy, I have swum out of a kayak several times wearing them and they still work.

    nparker
    Full Member

    55 and worn hearing aids for over 50 of those so started falling apart quite early on.. NHS aids are great and like LittleDave says, headband useful for wind noise. I find full face helmets a proper PITA though.

    shoko
    Full Member

    Thanks guys, probably 4-5 months before the next appointment so the wife will have to have to put up with me ‘ignoring’ her for a while longer.

    Main concern is the 1 (today) year old deciding to to investigate what’s in Dad’s ears 😜

    StirlingCrispin
    Full Member

    Thump wears hearing aids.  He struggles with wind noise when out on the bike so often just takes his hearing aid out and tucks it in his back pocket.

    Then there was the time we got to the brewery and realised it had been dropped at the summit of the local hill. I had to head back up – and found it sitting where we’d been eating our sandwiches.

    The NHS hearing aids are several years behind the new ones. Main differences seem to be in software for noise cancelling.

    Thump is still at school and tunes his hearing aids for the surroundings. You’ll need an Apple phone to get the best out of the app.

    Klunk
    Free Member

    the wife wears a buff band over her ears to reduce the wind noise with hers. Can just about have a conversation while riding if I shout.

    jkomo
    Full Member

    The NHS ones are fantastic, but if you’re a very active person, in lots of different surroundings, meetings etc the private ones are definitely a lot better. More channels, more tech scanning the acoustics around you, bluetooth to phone, App controllable, directional mics, rechargeable etc. Expect to pay £2k- £3k otherwise you’re just as well with NHS. Avoid he tiny ones, ‘receiver in canal’ (RIC) are the ones to go for, SS will do with a 4 year warranty, which is about how long they will last.

    woody2000
    Full Member

    58 and falling to bits

    Some bits are working OK if you’ve got a 1 year old 😁

    I can’t ride with mine, wind noise is too distracting, as is the amplified sound of it catching on helmet straps etc.  I do need to go get mine checked over, this thread is a timely reminder 👍

    boblo
    Free Member

    Avoid he tiny ones, ‘receiver in canal’ (RIC) are the ones to go for,


    @jkomo
    Can you expand on this please? I suddenly lost hearing in my right ear last year due to ‘ear stroke’ – I’m told. Now have moderate loss which is almost impossible in noisy environments so I’ve become even grumpier and stopped going to them…🙃

    cheekyget
    Free Member

    I wear the RIC type aids… mine work perfectly now I’ve got rid of the specsaver branded ones and changed to a proper make photek

    To cut down wind noise I wear a pirate bandanna…make sense towards these anyway…cool in the summer, bit of warmth in colder weather,  stops dirt sweat etc transfer to your helmet inside a d cuts down wind noise…win win

    As with anything the more you pay the better it is… so with money aids with wind noise is cut right down even without a cover over my ears.

    I had NHS ones about 20 years ago….I didnt get on with them…..so went private…but my wife just got her 1st NHS one last week ( only needed for 1 ear)  ..and I must say they do look impressive  and way better than the old versions

    I might talk to my gp next time about a set…its always good to have a back up.

    As far as riding with hearing aids go…you’ll get used to it

    It will seem alien at first but once you notice the sound difference,  you’ll be glad .

    Except when the battery goes and you’ll feel off balance…but that’s another story..ha ha ha

    nickc
    Full Member

    Main differences seem to be in software for noise cancelling.

    I tried some that were v expensive and marketed themselves as specifically good at wind-noise cancelling (Amplifon). They sucked just as badly as all the others I’ve ever tried. I don’t think any of them can in any sense of the word cut out wind noise, especially on a bike, I think you have to just balance out your priorities.

    the-muffin-man
    Full Member

    This is my NHS one – they’ve come a long way since my first one 20 years ago!

    It’s a Signia one – and even has an app where you can tune the hearing direction/change settings/volume etc. Specsavers also put different pre-sets on for different room/location settings.

    My advice would be get an NHS one first – you may find it does all you need. I suffer from otosclerosis where the bones in the inner ear are fused together (but only in my left ear!).

    https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/otosclerosis/#:~:text=Otosclerosis%20happens%20when%20a%20tiny,be%20passed%20on%20in%20families.

    IMG_2784

    MadBillMcMad
    Full Member

    I’m a very new user, with NHS ones. Lots of independent and small audiology/opticians shops will also do NHS aids. You’ll get a list of nearest to choose.

    I didn’t realise what I was missing until I got mine. Best pleasure, hearing the tinkle of water in a stream.

    Windy, wear a buff.

    Advice : take them out before you get in the bath. I have just smoked one of mine, waiting for it to be repaired/replaced.

    ernielynch
    Full Member

    Best pleasure, hearing the tinkle of water in a stream.

    When having a slash?

    brownperson
    Free Member

    To anyone wondering about whether to wear a hearing aid or not, I’d urge you to consider how your hearing loss affects others. My mum refused to acknowledge her increasing hearing loss for over 20 years. She claimed people were ‘mumbling’ or ‘talking too fast’ and other nonsense. Things reached a crisis point when doctors treating her cancer became concerned that she was unable to make informed decisions about her treatment, as it was obvious she wasn’t actually hearing and understanding what she was being told. She was very stubborn. So the ‘threat’ of treatment ending finally spurred her into actually getting something done about it. Even once she had had her hearing impairment assessed, she then often refused to actually use them, as she’d become resentful that I and others were right about her going deaf. It was an act of defiance. As she became more frail, I and others caring for her had to threaten her with things (like not cooking for her, not getting any food shopping in, etc) to get her to wear them, as trying to communicate with her was becoming impossible. I resorted to using an iPad with a speech to text feature to have a conversation with her. I understood her unwillingness to use them, as she said they produced too much background noise and going from her normal impaired state to a hearing one was alarming and confusing for her. A common issue with many hearing aid users I’m told. This all many that her relationships with myself and others suffered, and she became quite lonely. But this was entirely her own doing, she made no attempt to compromise and be less selfish.

    A friend of ours is currently losing his hearing, and is also refusing to acknowledge this. Again, this is impacting on his friends, family and colleagues. It is incredibly frustrating trying to communicate with someone who refuses to accept they have hearing issues. It boiled over recently when a close friend of his lost it and had a right go at him, so now he is finally considering a hearing test.

    So I urge anyone who might be experiencing hearing difficulties/loss, to have it checked out. Because not only could it be something treatable, it could also could help anyone close to you, or you work with, communicate better with you. I am having my hearing tested next week, as I’ve recently become slightly concerned that my left ear isn’t what it was. I also need to wear glasses; I can’t understand why needing eyewear/contacts is readily accepted by many people, yet hearing issues are often ignored.

    easily
    Free Member

    I wear mine at work and when I’m watching tv, I don’t bother otherwise unless I’m visiting a doctor or something.

    I put them in when I get to work, and remove them before I cycle home. Easy.

    gray
    Full Member

    brownperson
    Free Member
    To anyone wondering about whether to wear a hearing aid or not, I’d urge you to consider how your hearing loss affects others.

    +1 and please can someone tell my Dad?

    Bikingcatastrophe
    Free Member

    +1 and please can someone tell my Dad?

    Are you my son?? 😉

    Went to an independent audiologist a couple of years ago and it confirmed that my hearing was …. impaired. Offered a trial but the aids they work with are a bit spendy. Supposed to be good and tuneable etc. Also encouraged me not to leave it too long as, apparently, the older you get the harder it is for your brain to adjust to the aids. Went a year later for a comparison test and, yup, they were a bit worse. Generally I’m not too bad but loud background noise is a bit of a killer. Recommended aid is the Audeo Paradise from Phonak. While I think I will benefit (Mrs BC certainly does!) I’m still reticent to jump on that treadmill though – the master of procrastination!

    easily
    Free Member

    Just go for it Bikingcatastrophe, it’s not that big a deal.

    I got mine from the NHS, they were great and it din’t cost me a thing.

    Loud background noise is noticeable for a little while, then disappears (it’s a good idea to wear them a LOT when you first get them, as you get used to it faster). It’s actually quite amusing as everything sounds loud – keyboard clicks, overhead birds sound like they are really close, keys going into locks … as I say, you get used to it.

    They really help when there is a group conversation going on. I find that people talking just to me raise their voice a bit, but when they are pitching it to the group I cannot hear – this is where they are useful.

    As i said just go for it, you’ll forget you have them after a month or so.

    shoko
    Full Member

    Thanks for the input, it’s being able to follow conversations and not lose track when there’s background noise/other conversations going on that’ll be the revelation.

    Left it far too long as I’m a tight git and didn’t want to spend my own money on private aids – I’ve an expensive bike habit to maintain after all 😂

    I’ll try not to lose then in the woods or down the bog.

    longdog
    Free Member

    Meant to say I’ve also been told I speak really quietly though I think I’m speaking loud. Apparently with conductive loss it’s because you hear everything in your head loud, just not the outside noises.

    Anyway, as I said earlier, possibly 52 weeks until I’m seen by audiology. The letter says don’t hassle your GP to get an earlier appointment as it won’t happen 🤣

    jkomo
    Full Member

    Boblo- the tiny ‘completely in canal’ (CIC) hearing aids are very small so have less room to pack in the tech, the speaker and mics are closer together so aren’t as good, and because the whole thing goes right in the ear are more likely to suffer from moisture ingress and go wrong. The best ones sit behind the ear and have a thin wire to the speaker which goes in the ear canal.

    Bruce
    Full Member

    @jkomo

    That’s not entirely true, the best hearing aid is one that is suitable for the hearing loss and RICs might not always be appropriate.

    boblo
    Free Member

    I did have an in ear jobbie when I was ‘mild’. I’m now ‘moderate’ after something they called ‘ear stroke’ – sudden loss on one side a week or so before all hell broke loose on the DVT/embolism front but that’s another chapter in the ‘how fdcek up am I?’ saga…

    The in ear one is old so I don’t have the app to mess with it. Other than that, it’s better for wind noise and exercise induced sweatyness etc which swamps my round the ear jobbie.

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