Health, longevity and lifestyle changes for the *cough" over 40s. Fad v fact.

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  • Health, longevity and lifestyle changes for the *cough" over 40s. Fad v fact.
  • Any complete exclusions of a particluar food group?

    Yes I stopped eating Vegans, they just didn’t agree with me.

    IGMC

    Premier Icon Pawsy_Bear
    Subscriber

    I think this says it all, good sound non fad advice

    http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/Pages/Whybeactive.aspx

    fasthaggis
    Member

    Buy a set of skinfold calipers ,sorted. 🙂

    ti_pin_man
    Member

    Hmmm not really sure what youre asking for… I’m 45 and havent really changed much, I’m about the same weight and about the same waist size as I was in my 20s. I ride a lot, climb a bit, stay active with my daughters and just eat healthy. I have the odd treat. the occasional drink. I dont do any nasty things to excess but I dont block anything out. In my head I call my ethos Balance. I recommend it to the house. The crux of it is the exercise bit, keep it going for as long as you can, you will get slower but keep trying to do it, whatever your it is.

    EDIT: on TV last night a chap said if you eat a bacon sandwich it statistically knocks an hour off the length of your life. Sure eat one, enjoy it, but not to excess.

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    Five a day, no, sorry, make that seven a day. Oh, hang on, we’ve confused you, back as you were please, back to five a day!

    You’re unlikely to harm yourself by eating too much veg 🙂

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    Have you gone from drinking to completely t-total and how was it?

    How was it? Boring- it means all your anecdotes end with ‘and then I got home’

    joking aside – be wary of all this total exclusion (or total inclusion) stuff. Its all down to smoking. One of the big health revelations of the last hundred years was the link between smoking and lung cancer. It became apparent that pretty much every incidence of lung cancer was the result of smoking. That gave you one clear cut problem; lung cancer – one clear cut action; don’t smoke- one clear cut result; don’t get lung cancer. It was a public health and media sensation.

    Absolutely nothing else in life is like that though, even though we really really want that to be the case. The good things and the bad things are all inter-mixed and inter-related and contradictory. The factors that contribute to a condition are various, changing things can have benefits that are marginal and have unintended consequences for other aspects of you health.

    Even issues we consider to be clear cut – like weight. Overweight is linked to all sorts of conditions but those links aren’t necessarily causal or those conditions exclusive to people who are overweight its not wholly clear where obesity is a cause of a condition or a symptom of it and there are very few conditions that are obesity related that are obesity-exclusive.

    Being active is important, but the benefits of being mildly active (a little gentle exercise each week) instead of inactive are considerable, but the benefits of being considerably active over being mildly active are pretty negligible (other than in the less tangible sense of being fun).

    We want one thing – a food, and action, a choice – to change another specific thing – a risk, a benefit, a danger but it won’t. You can’t view those risks in insolation from everything else life can throw at you and you can’t view your actions that way either.

    Solo
    Member

    Buy a set of skinfold calipers ,sorted.
    I’ve read that simply possessing SFCs makes you 17% BF.
    😎

    avdave2
    Member

    I’ve had a plant based diet for 30 years and am not dead. I also know some people who have not used this approach and they too are still alive.

    We haven’t lasted this long and populated vast areas of the world without being pretty adaptable about what we can healthily eat.

    Solo
    Member

    healthily
    Hhmm, define healthy.
    Edit:
    Actually, don’t bother on my account. IRCBA.

    Anyway. I reckon Darwin is onto something, even without skin fold calipers for assistance.
    😉

    wrecker
    Member

    Stopped smoking, eating anything with added sugar/rubbish with negligable nutritional value (no cakes, biscuits, desserts soft drinks etc etc), no caffiene and no drinking alcohol for a month. This has also coincided with me stepping it up in the gym.
    I feel pretty good. I’ve also been using myfitnesspal app, and despite eating a fraction of the sugar I’m permitted, carbs only on training days, and far less fat, I haven’t seen a massive change in my shape. I do seem to constantly miss some vits though despite taking a multi vit (Iron is one).
    I don’t miss the sugar or booze. Becks blue is OK and I’ll probably continue like this; only having a drink when I go to the pub once or twice a month and I’ll not go back to drinking coffee again. I feel much more clear headed, my skin is better and I have lost some fat. The obvious benefits of not smoking probably don’t need to be spelled out.

    globalti
    Member

    I’m less worried about the physical effects of ageing – I cycle so I stay slim no matter what I eat – and more worried about the psychological effects. Right now life is not going too well in several different ways and I’m feeling increasingly fragile emotionally, beginning to worry that I might do something stupid. How many others in their 40s and 50s are in the same situation?

    Listening to the radio today and they had a chap on who had complained of heart problems for five or so years. Despite two stent insertions and an improvement in his lifestyle, moving to a vegeterian diet, he saw no benefit. His own research (and i dont have a link) to a study in the US led him to try a plant based diet. Quite quickly, his condition improved and he was able to return to a full and normal life, inlcuding going back to work after his five year absence.
    Whether the science backs up the claims is maybe a matter for a seperate debate but I wonder what sort of lifestyle changes you have made, and if they have served any benefit.
    A cardiologist replying was aware of the research but wasn’t prepared to say he agreed with it or not.
    Revelations like that make me think that I might need to be a bit more canny with my lifestyle choices but without getting to swept up in fads and fashions.
    I (having passed the big 4-0) realised that the waistline was expanding so went on the 5:2 diet. That worked for me and I lost almost two stone. More than that though, I’d like to think that I take a bit more time to check the calories of food eaten and the portion control has improved and the lost weight has stayed off.
    There is still room for improvement in my own lifestyle but there do appear to be a lot of myths around, especially with food/exercise. The HIT training concept acheived quite a bit of media coverage but yet it doesnt seem to be promoted, or maybe not promoted in my world!
    Asparin, its good, then its bad.
    Five a day, no, sorry, make that seven a day. Oh, hang on, we’ve confused you, back as you were please, back to five a day!
    I’d be interested to hear real world experiences.
    Have you gone from drinking to completely t-total and how was it?
    Any complete exclusions of a particluar food group?

    wrecker
    Member

    Oh, and after we have another sprog, I plan on taking that money I saved from smoking and spending it on HGH 😀

    olddog
    Member

    To underline the lack of any consensus about all this see yesterday’s Horizon on eating meat . As someone with a major family history of CVD I’m pretty interested in that aspect of it as I want to reload the dice a bit away from my potential negative genetic factors. But years of following this stuff, seeing the science progress (and be hopelessly badly misrepresented) I’m not really that wiser. At least there seems to be an admission of it all being very complicated replacing the over simplifications of the past messages.

    Basically my view is everything in moderation apart from exercise, fruit and veg – where I fill my boots (and booze every now and then because life has to be worth living!)

    Solo
    Member

    Globalti.

    Telling you that I might be able to relate and often can’t see the point anymore, for myself.

    My advice to you is to get help.

    olddog
    Member

    globalti _ I see a lot of self reflection and discontent in myself and my friends who are in 40s/50s. I think it is a time when there is a lot of appraisal about what we have and haven’t achieved and what we may or may not be able to do in the future – some of it can be pretty sobering, but equally there is still time to turn things to the positive.

    As Solo said, if you are struggling to work your way through it – it may be good to seek some help, and also if you have people of a similar age you can talk to you may well find they have similar experiences and feelings.

    Premier Icon seadog101
    Subscriber

    While I must admit to never having been unhealthy, per se, now that I am closer to 50 than 40 ( 😥 ) I’ve been making more proactive choices regarding my health and well being.

    I try to burn off more calories than I consume, have meals that are multi-coloured, very little meat, avoid being sedentary at work.

    Drink is still enjoyed, but it’s just a couple of beers/glasses of wine a couple of times a week. That makes it a pleasure, not the requirement that I used to need.

    Above all this, what has really helped is that my wife and kids are of the same mindset. All of us trying to be healthy makes it so easy.

    We still enjoy cakes and puddings and choccy etc, but as these are pretty infrequent therefore, really appreciated by us.

    Premier Icon ton
    Subscriber

    everything in moderation, food, ale and also for us on here….excersise.
    dont over do anything.
    i know i am not a shining example, but in my favour, my heart problem was purely a electrical fault rather than blocked/bunged up arteries from a bad diet.
    i also think in life, you get dealt a certain hand, not matter how you diet or excersise, that hand will be played out without your control.

    keep healthy….. 8)

    Premier Icon cinnamon_girl
    Subscriber

    Right now life is not going too well in several different ways and I’m feeling increasingly fragile emotionally, beginning to worry that I might do something stupid. How many others in their 40s and 50s are in the same situation?

    Telling you that I might be able to relate and often can’t see the point anymore, for myself.

    olddog speaks sense. It is a process that many go through, asking oneself tough questions including ones that you brush under the carpet. Be brutally honest about your hopes and fears.

    I’ve been through some tough stuff but have come through it. A huge amount of gratitude goes to a couple of close girl friends whom I’ve known for decades and were always there for me. Definitely comfortable with myself now but it’s taken a while.

    Men, and don’t wish to offend here, tend to keep it bottled up rather than talking to their mates or their brother/sister etc. That’s not good.

    The easy option is always to do nothing so hold that thought.

    Replace diet hype (apart from EMEL) and spend more time stretching. I wish someone had told me that at 40.

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