Has anyone gone TV free in a household with children?

Home Forum Chat Forum Has anyone gone TV free in a household with children?

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 49 total)
  • Has anyone gone TV free in a household with children?
  • camo16
    Member

    Are your children into TV now?

    If they are, your plan could lead to a world of pain.

    jota180
    Member

    Just make you that they understand that ‘this is going to hurt you mare than it’ll hurt them’

    They’ll understand then

    djglover
    Member

    Can I ask why?

    Premier Icon sparksmcguff
    Subscriber

    Sort of. Our kids don’t get to watch CBBC etc. They do have a fine selection (ie the OH choose them) of DVDs (including the complete Ivor the Engine). These they have access to at the weekend for a couple of hours in the morning.

    makeitorange
    Member

    I remember there was a kid in class at school who didn’t have a TV, unfortunately a lot of the other kids ripped him a bit for it and he was obviously left out of any “what was on last night” conversations. Then again a lot of stuff is on iPlayer and the like nowadays so having an actual TV isn’t a necessity.

    Premier Icon unklehomered
    Subscriber

    good lord you’ll be wanting them read next…

    RV
    Member

    My 5 year old goes weeks without watching TV. We might watch the odd film on a wet Sunday evening during the winter but that is all. The outlaws let her watch a bit when they have her but she never asks for it at home. She did watch a fair bit of the Olympics though. TV don’t go on till she’s gone to bed.
    Can’t imagine it’ll be an easy thing to take away if they are used to it.

    joemarshall
    Member

    I remember there was a kid in class at school who didn’t have a TV, unfortunately a lot of the other kids ripped him a bit for it and he was obviously left out of any “what was on last night” conversations. Then again a lot of stuff is on iPlayer and the like nowadays so having an actual TV isn’t a necessity.

    Yeah, that was me that was. Whilst I can see the advantages now, I certainly got bullied about it at the time.

    We haven’t got one right now, but we’ll see – she does watch TV on iPlayer, at child minders sometimes too. If it becomes a pain with her wanting to watch things at particular times in future, maybe we’ll buy one. Hard to know whether kids will be all about iPlayer in the future anyway.

    Joe

    Bimbler
    Member

    Are your children into TV now?

    Yeah, I think we all are, especially me, but when we go camping we don’t have TV we all really enjoy it, unsurprising because we’re on holiday but even wet evenings when we’re tent bound we’ve surprised ourselves by having a really good time.

    Can I ask why?

    Spend more time together as a family, get more stuff done, stop letting screens devour our time – internetz/DS etc included.

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    It is possible to let kids watch TV without them turning into couch potatoes.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    You mean broadcast TV, or the whole hog excluding movies too?

    Our 3yo hardly watches TV, and that which she does watch is usually some sort of documentary or Deadly 60 on CBBC.

    She watches loads of films though (chosen by us to be worthwhile) and she has learned loads about stories and characters and so on.

    winston
    Member

    Yep – 5 year old and a 8 year old here in a TV free house. Wife misses it more than they do. Have loads of DVD’s though – that way we get to say what they watch – plus no TV tax either.

    Premier Icon ddmonkey
    Subscriber

    TV strictly rationed in our house, and now when they occasionally ask to watch some TV we generally say yeah fine cos they don’t ask to that much. Lots of playing with toys, playing in the garden and doing stuff as a family at the weekend instead.

    Premier Icon salsaboy
    Subscriber

    My daughter, now 12, has lived without tv for 9 yrs.
    She has self regulated access to BBC Iplayer and that’s only watched at weekends really.
    As long as she gets to see Doctor Who all is well.
    There is always music on in the house, or Radio 4extra, she is a big fan of radio comedy.
    She is either singing, dancing, reading or laughing and likes the ‘niche’ aspect of being one of only a few kids at here school that don’t spend the evenings watching soaps or “talent” shows.
    It works for us all.

    trb
    Member

    We’d probably die without a TV. Putting Fireman Sam on is the only way I can stop them from fighting long enough for me to cook some tea!

    Bimbler
    Member

    It is possible to let kids watch TV without them turning into couch potatoes.

    They’ve got TV time now, just thinking about cutting it right back for all of us

    You mean broadcast TV, or the whole hog excluding movies too?

    Unsure as yet, early days, not sure how we’d deal with not watching the Great British Bake Off etc which we watch as a family and which the kids enjoy mainly for that reason.

    bikebouy
    Member

    MrsBouys brother and wife have 2 kids, 5 and 4. They have a small TV in the house thats knackered and only plays DVD’s. They have a MAC that they use to watch iPlayer etc. but only a few times a week.
    Kids don’t seem to mind unless they go back home after being at Grand Parents where they get to watch CBBC et all.
    Parents don’t restrict use, more a case of them all doing stuff around the Farm, so too busy really.

    On the whole it seems they’re fine without it.

    Though as school becomes more of a focus I guess at some point the eldest might start to complain a bit when others get to watch TV..

    Who knows, bit early for that just yet.

    Bimbler
    Member

    Toying with the idea of giving up the toob after Christmas, interested in any experiences of TV free/v-lite life.

    Premier Icon salsaboy
    Subscriber

    The big difference we’ve found is that tv’s tend to be put on and left on regardless. With dvd’s and Iplayer you plan what and when you watch more and don’t just sit watching because it’s there.

    Premier Icon kimbers
    Subscriber

    djglover – Member

    Can I ask why?

    Premier Icon ddmonkey
    Subscriber

    Heyeyeyeye – there’s nothing wrong with a bit of MR TUMBLE! πŸ™‚

    TiRed
    Member

    We used to have a two-week TV-free period. The kids would moan for about a day or two, then get on with playing. Mrs dj would moan for about two weeks. I don’t watch TV anyway*, so no loss really. Top tip: take the fuses to work,and leave them there.

    *obviously this was not implemented during a Grand Tour πŸ˜‰

    Premier Icon maxray
    Subscriber

    She watches loads of films though (chosen by us to be worthwhile) and she has learned loads about stories and characters and so on.

    πŸ˜€ Imagine you being like Victorian dad, sitting her infront of macbeth or some OU programme whilst you nip to the toilets to ogle the boobies in national geographic πŸ˜€

    Personally I don’t see anything wrong with TV, obviously I don’t let my kids sit watching it endlessly but there is plenty of good educational and fun programming out there.

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    Toddler North watches limited TV: maybe 15 mins of Tiny Pop cartoons in an evening (irregularly). Otherwise, it’s mainly sport as that’s all we would ever watch during her waking hours.

    Mrs North and I watch too much, when tired, in the evenings. This time of year is worst, as there’s all the run-up-to-Christmas-every-night-of-the-week-stuff-on-that-can’t-possibly-be-missed-and-yes-going-to-the-garage-to-fettle-a-bike/ride-the-turbo-is-being-unsociable.

    Apparently.

    Premier Icon SaxonRider
    Subscriber

    I have lots of kids, and gave up the tv about five years ago. Now we can control what comes into the home by watching DVDs, or limiting viewing to what’s on iPlayer.

    ji
    Member

    Four kids, and we gave up broadcast TV about 4 years ago. Always thought we would reinstate it at some point as the eldest went to secondary school, bur as said above she likes the novelty of being different…

    We do watch DVDs and iplayer etc, but this tends to be watching specific programmes, not hours of channel surfing crap.

    We did it to save a few quid, and because we weren’t really watching TV anyway. Try it – you can always go back.

    Edukator
    Member

    I went out with a girl who had grown up in a TV free house. She had a bizarre view of politics and world events, and was very hard work to talk to. I don’t think she’d ever seen someone walking on the moon, helicopters over Vietnam or Slade playing “Cum on feel the Noize”. Don’t do it.

    Premier Icon MrOvershoot
    Subscriber

    I’m not sure TV free is the best way to go… But TV policed works well, restrict to what you want them watching and its not too bad.

    b r
    Member

    Why, aren’t you cap(able) of controlling their access?

    RichPenny
    Member

    I don’t think she’d ever seen someone walking on the moon, helicopters over Vietnam or Slade playing “Cum on feel the Noize”.

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwZb2mqId0A[/video]

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdnkd9q88dQ&feature=related[/video]

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLsw668PVyY[/video]

    These are just for her.

    And one just for you πŸ™‚

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tggRL7xHjUg[/video]

    Premier Icon takisawa2
    Subscriber

    Kids watch very little Broadcast TV. They tend to watch it on iPlayer etc.
    I love the radio, especially Radio 4 in the evenings. They have some brilliant stuff on, but some of the comedy grates me though.
    About to cancel out VM subscription actually, since getting a SmartTV the box hasn’t been on.

    I’m amazed that some parents stop their kids watching CBBC etc completely. Horrible Histories is just brilliant. Should be on prime time in evening. πŸ™‚
    That song “Born to rule over you” about the kings was hilarious.

    Two kids: 5 and 7
    No TV
    But we do have in’ernet

    Premier Icon jambalaya
    Subscriber

    We experimented with this for a short while, IMO it’s a mistake and your risk the children feeling or beaing treated like “weirdos” – a lot of kids popular culture includes tv shows. If you feel strongly about it then create an environment where there are lots of other fun alternatives and have limits for how much tv they can watch

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Imagine you being like Victorian dad, sitting her infront of macbeth or some OU programme whilst you nip to the toilets to ogle the boobies in national geographic

    Hehehe.. when I say worthwhile I mean:

    Monsters Inc
    Madagascar
    Cloudy with a chance of Meatballs
    Cars 1
    Wall E

    and so on. Non worthwhile films that we own and I discourage include

    Cats and Dogs
    Cars 2
    Tom and Jerry (the film)
    Finding bloody Nemo

    Mainly because they are shite.

    Premier Icon jambalaya
    Subscriber

    es-cap-eh πŸ™‚

    Hadge
    Member

    Have you ever worked out just how much you’ve actually learnt or is possible to learn from watching tv? Tv is a great visual learning tool as well so I think not having one for your children isn’t a good idea but they’re your kids and so it’s your choice.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    My daughter learned a hell of a lot about how to understand stories and characters in terms of plot, motivation, and emotional content from watching the good movies. Her make believe games are brilliant!

    Edukator
    Member

    Thanks for the vids, most enjoyable.

    I met her 30 years ago next week but I get your point.

    druidh
    Member

    How very middle class.

    acjim
    Member

    My folks restricted tv when i was a kid and I grew up as a complete tv addict, so be careful what you wish for!

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 49 total)

The topic ‘Has anyone gone TV free in a household with children?’ is closed to new replies.