Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
  • Hangs head in shame, ebike motor type range question!
  • Premier Icon davegt
    Free Member

    Hi Folks

    hoping you can help!

    I have an e8000 with a brace of 504wh batteries

    it’s time to change the bike and wanted to know what the general consensus is on range. Assuming the riding conditions, support level, rider weight etc were the same

    I have heard that the ep8 and 630wh is not a whole lot better than the e8000 with the 504.

    bosch gen4 with the 625 seems to get the best range, even when compared to a levo with the 700wh

    if anybody can actually put some real facts to this it would be really appreciated!

    Thanks

    Dave

    Premier Icon julians
    Full Member

    Hard to give objective info as it varies so much from rider to rider, route to route.

    There are 5 of us in our little riding group, with the following motors and batteries

    2 x bosch gen 4 625wh
    2 x shimano ep8 630wh
    1 x spesh brose 2.2 700wh

    The bosch and shimano bikes go about the same distance, the spesh goes a little further.

    Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Free Member

    Bosch performance CX gen 4 625w on hilly terrain on emtb mode it really depends if there are one or two ups and lots of long downs or if its similar ups and downs.

    But ive never actually done so much as to drain the battery entirely, preferring some left to cycle homewards

    Round the town with slicks, hills,flats about 65miles in tour mode. So I would say somewhere between 30-40 miles dependent on how hilly

    Premier Icon doomanic
    Full Member

    My Rail with the 625 Bosch regularly gets more range than my mate’s Bullit with the Shimano 630 and that’s the same with me riding his bike too. The Bosch also feels more powerful and punchy.
    Using the new Tour+ mode I can almost as much range out of one 625 as another mate gets from two 504 Levo batteries in Turbo but I’m never left behind.

    Premier Icon mboy
    Free Member

    Hard to say because each system suits different riding styles. If you have a high cadence riding style, Shimano motors will reward you with increased range over and above the others or someone else on a Shimano with a lower cadence pedalling style. Bosch systems seem tl reward a lower cadence, punchier pedalling style.

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Free Member

    You can use the larger Shimano batteries with the E8000 – you just need a different mount? That’s assuming it’s not an internally mounted one.

    My bike has huge draggy downhill tyres, an e8000 motor and 504wh battery and I can get 60 miles if I take it easy on it and it’s summer. Have had less than 20 miles in winter mud though!

    Don’t suppose you’re selling any of the Shimano batteries? Thinking that having a spare would be good

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    I wouldn’t look too much into the motor/battery for your next bike, they’re all pretty similar, it’s not rocket science with brushless motors and how they use power to operate, the difference with the EP8 and Bosch Gen4 over the E8000 is size and weight, as well as torque settings being increased, this of course is useful, but isn’t the motor, it’s the software.

    Range really is a personal thing, some folk stick the bike in EMTB modes for the ride and just concentrate on biking, others manage the modes to make sure they can get more range, but have to put more in themselves.

    If range is a concern, then it’s always worth looking at bikes that can be fitted with a range extender, loads of manufacturers do them now, and they give you an extra 200wh usually, so enough to get you another few miles on the trails.

    Premier Icon renton
    Free Member

    I’ve had two bikes with the Bosch gen 4 and 625 battery. As a heavy unfit rider I could get around 25 miles around my local woods using eco and tour.

    Had my first ride yesterday on my new bike that has the brose motor and 700 battery. Same trails as before and not ridden in two months. I did just under 22 miles mainly in trail with a bit of turbo towards the end and finsihed with 40% battery.

    Premier Icon bikenski
    Free Member

    I seem to get the same (almost exactly the same) percentage use of battery from my Bosch 625 compared to a friend’s Levo 700wh (similar rider weight & equivalent power modes used)

    Premier Icon intheborders
    Free Member

    it’s time to change the bike

    Why?

    Premier Icon doomanic
    Full Member

    Why not? Renton’s had three this year already… 😂

    Premier Icon renton
    Free Member

    Why not? Renton’s had three this year already… 😂

    Haha I’m giving Guy Kesteven a run for his money on the amount of bikes I’ve tested 🙂

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    So many variables, ascent, ground conditions, tyres, rider weight, cadence….

    frinstance

    I’ve had two bikes with the Bosch gen 4 and 625 battery. As a heavy unfit rider I could get around 25 miles around my local woods using eco and tour.

    I rode 20 miles in my local woods last saturday, I never use eco, using tour+ and turbo’d a few really manky climbs, 2000′ of ascent, so not exactly a big day, and finished just under 50%.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Too late to edit, that was on same battery and motor as rents.

    Premier Icon Hob-Nob
    Free Member

    So many variables

    Basically that.

    Yesterday I raced mine (Brose/700wh) for example & it did ~25km & 1750m vert, mostly trail/turbo & it had about 15% left from memory, but I was purposefully putting no effort in on the climbs and making the bike do the work (like most ebikers then 😉 ). I raced it last weekend too, and mostly rode in trail (but turned up) and ended up at ~40km & 2500m vert.

    I also ride it a reasonable amount in Eco, with the settings turned down & it will do ridiculous amounts. I’ve done over 60k & 3k vert & still had 40% battery left.

    I had a Bosch previously (625) which was also great on battery use. Probably not quite as good as the current Brose, but really good however – definitely has more low down grunt than other motors, but feels way less natural as a result.

    The Shimano we have in the house does have way less range (and power). Feels the most natural, but eking it out in Eco it’s all in at about 60k & 2200m (540wh battery).

    Premier Icon chiefgrooveguru
    Free Member

    There’s far too many variables – the most obvious one is rider weight but actually the biggest one is how the rider is choosing to pedal.

    When I’m feeling under the weather or tired I’ll let my bike basically tow me about in turbo whilst normally I’ll pedal as hard as I do on a normal bike. I use so much more battery power when I’m working less hard, even though in both cases the bike is in turbo.

    Premier Icon davegt
    Free Member

    Thanks for all the replies. Really interesting to see such variation out there. Lots of comments on different fitness, cadence, rider type, support levels etc. What I was trying to convey at the start, was the standardisation of those factors. Same rider, same elevation, in the same conditions, with the same support level, with the same tyres, same ground conditions. Standardising as much as possible

    I know from rides with friends that range differs wildly. However, removing variables as much as possible, what is the most efficient battery/motor combo. Results will vary of course, but with enough info you can spot trends etc.

    For me, somebody that has ridden a number of ebike motor/battery combos on a loop that is as free of variables as possible, would be well placed to comment on the differences.

    For instance, I want to try an EP8 and the 630wh against my E8000 / 504wh. My intention is to set the torque level and the support level the same. Then ride a loop with the lowest number of variables as possible and make some comparisons.

    Its not feasible for me to try every combo, so its great there is such an informed community here on STW.

    In the hope I can help with range questions, here is what I have found in 4500 miles on my current bike:

    I am 102kg / average fitness.
    Tyres, Michelin Wild X Enduro 2.6

    E8000 in factory eco high (30nm / 60% support) with 504wh on an off road loop in the north of Scotland is typically 45km / 1000m elevation.

    Thereafter, the trade off of more elevation, shorter range, or less elevation more range.

    Typical range in factory trail, which I think is 70nm / 110% support is typically 30km / 750m on good surfaces.

    This can drop to 20k / 650m on boggy, wet heather etc.

    Premier Icon pampmyride
    Full Member

    Yam PW-X2 motor in a Haibike. 20 – 80 miles depending on the usual hills, mud, speed, rider’s weedy legs etc. My pal’s bosch gets similar range, but reports the Yam is quicker up hills… both 600 wattys.

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Free Member

    DaveGT – the range I get on my e8000/504wh is way way higher. I’m on 2.8″ downhill tyres too.
    Keeping it in trail mode I’ll get about 45 miles out of a battery. On Eco I can get 60 miles at least.
    I do use it more as an assist though and pedal a lot, not really just cruising and letting the motor do the work.

    Also, I’m only 75kg…

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