Hanging out with a murderer

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  • Hanging out with a murderer
  • Tom B
    Member

    Weird one, there has been a high profile disappearance (that turned into a murder) of a local midwife in my hometown….I don’t live too far away, so lots of sharing missing persons info etc on Facebook….

    Fast forward to today and I read an article where the guy whom has been charged with her murder has been beaten up in prison…..I went to sixth form with him, knew him through what is now my ex wife. He was in my extended group of friends, was always at the same club we used to sample our first proper ‘nights out’, think he was sort of in touch with my ex wife throughout our twenties.

    Not even sure what this post is about tbh, it’s just a very surreal feeling. He was always a decent guy, had an okay job, was married, never in trouble at all with the police…..basically he was the same as me! Not quite sure what happens in your life that leads you from that to his current situation.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Subscriber

    In Galloway in the 1990’s I often had a meal or a walk with a murderer, after his release from prison. He was a nice chap, who mad a huge mistake in his life, for which he was remorseful and paid a long sentence price for. Just one of the folk you meet in life.

    Premier Icon scaled
    Subscriber

    Similar experience here Matt, I met a couple of former life liaison officers in Leicestershire, they’d started a building company with a load of their old, errr, clients? Quite a few of them were living in their house as condition of their release and every one of them seemed perfectly normal.

    mikewsmith
    Member

    I got a message form a close mate who said the guy and his wife had been invited to his kids birthday party but they had politely declined. Now we know why. He is going through exactly the same thoughts.

    avdave2
    Member

    Shared a tent for a week with two people who went on to kill 3 people by smothering them in their beds while robbing their houses. One of them was a first class horrible piece of work even then aged around 13. The other one stupid enough to go along with him. I think our Scout group was blessed with an above average number of unpleasant psychopaths, I witnessed another all round nasty piece of work throwing a felling axe at someone who had said something he didn’t like.

    FunkyDunc
    Member

    Mrs FD hasn’t murdered anyone but she does routinely chop live people’s arms and legs off, and remove vast amounts of flesh from people’s bodies

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Subscriber

    Mrs FD hasn’t murdered anyone but she does routinely chop live people’s arms and legs off

    Surgeon or divorce lawyer, I’ve heard both cost and arm and a leg?

    TheDTs
    Member

    Chap I’d known all the way through school went on to murder his father with an axe. The only person I have ever had a fight with. Troubled from the start, lost his mum when he was tiny, had everything he could have ever needed, but never got the help he needed.

    The case with the OP, strange case, no plea required as no confirmed cause of death..

    tnrbilly
    Member

    Live in a small town where there was a murder several years ago – pretty shocking and out of character for the place. I didn’t directly know the person convicted but remembered him from school (year or two below me) and regularly saw him around town. The wife also worked in an off licence at the time and said he came in every day for a single can of Special Brew, no more than that and was always polite and very pleasant.

    nealglover
    Member

    Live in a small town where there was a murder several years ago…

    Midsomer ?

    Premier Icon funkmasterp
    Subscriber

    I have two old friends of my brothers who were convicted of murder. One killed himself in prison and the other is now out and has rebuilt a life for himself. The circumstances in both cases were tragic (nothing like the case in the OP) and just extremely sad.

    The guy who took his own life was basically pushed and bullied until he snapped at the people doing the bullying. Tragic loss of two lives being the result.

    The other friends life pretty much turned to shit, he got in with a bad crowd and it got worse from there. Last time I saw him, which is a fair few years ago now, he pretty much told me not a day goes by that he isn’t full of remorse and sadness for what happened.

    Premier Icon Dickyboy
    Subscriber

    A guy who had murdered his wife near here went into the designer clothes shop afterwards to cancel her orders and told the post mistress he’d “done away with her” when she mentioned she hadn’t seen her in a while.

    tails
    Member

    Do people who’ve been charged go to normal prison before the court case? It’s always shocking when something happens out of the blue, I’m sure your life will resume to normal in a week or two. His on the other hand may be long and miserable.

    Scouts again…  I shared a lift every other week with the son of the guy who chopped up his opera singing wife in Mallorca and stuffed her limbs into bins.  The dad was a proper odd-ball.  He let his 10 year old son bring the massive Volvo out of the garage, down the lane, up two main roads and park it out front.  He also told us amusing stories of torturing his classmates when he was a boy.

    I see he’s out after serving four years…  http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/12124591.Scottish_wife_murderer_free_after_four_years_in_Spanish_jail/

    My dad petitioned the government to allow the release of a Chinese murderer who then spent his time hanging around the house.  Strung up his girlfriend with a piano wire.  He enjoyed making jokes about the whole thing without ever admitting his guilt.

    nealglover
    Member

    My dad petitioned the government to allow the release of a Chinese murderer who then spent his time hanging around the house.  Strung up his girlfriend with a piano wire.  He enjoyed making jokes about the whole thing without ever admitting his guilt.

    It seems like there should be more to that story than there is ?

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Subscriber

    I went to school with this delightful, upstanding citizen.

    https://www.examiner.co.uk/news/west-yorkshire-news/no-remorse-denby-dale-killer-4958702

    Tbh, he had ‘prison’ in his eyes, even at 13…

    “It seems like there should be more to that story than there is ?”

    Not really.  There was a miscarriage of justice insomuchas the guy had been locked up for 22 years which is a lot more than usual for a crime of passion.  My dad worked for the BBC as a radio studio manager making programmes for ethnic minorities and this case caught his attention, so he “sponsored” the guy after campaigning for his release.

    “Prisoner Tony” was a bit of a weird character – he’d gone in as a very young man and came out as an adult with an 18 year old man’s expectations and experience (of “normal” life).  He was scary and vulnerable in equal measures.

    poly
    Member

    Fast forward to today and I read an article where the guy whom has been charged with her murder has been beaten up in prison…

    Keep in in mind that although he has been charged he is on remand (so to answer another post is in a “normal” prison but on a wing only with other remand prisoners and gets slightly better privileges – but has still lost his liberty for now at least).  As such he should still be presumed innocent until the crown prove otherwise.  Plenty of people go on remand and are later acquitted, some because the crown failed to prove its case to the required standard, some because the person genuinely didn’t do it.

    Premier Icon duckman
    Subscriber

    Been teaching for 12 years, as of last month have taught 5 murderers. Wouldn’t have guessed any of them.

    Premier Icon andytherocketeer
    Subscriber

    kid in the year below me at school tried to take the life of a 13yo girl during afternoon break in the playground

    he failed

    he was always a nutcase that everyone was sure was destined for HMP Borstal (the local jail), but I think that stopped being a “borstal” around that time, so he ended up at some other “school for special educational needs”.

    my great great great grandfather was acquitted of murder

    his older brother wasn’t

    their father supposedly confessed after the hanging, but I haven’t found actual evidence of that part of the story yet

    A lovely but troubled young lady I knew during my worst depression days at the turn of the century randomly bumped into me a few years later and we met at a pub with our partners, he seemed a bit odd as first impressions go, fast forward to 2011 and he savagely killed Anita with multiple stab wounds during a huge stand-off with police in the middle of the night at their flat on Paynes Road. 🙁

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    Midsomer ?

    Can’t be as it was only the one. Midsomer they occur in minimum of three!

    Premier Icon funkmasterp
    Subscriber

    Been teaching for 12 years, as of last month have taught 5 murderers. Wouldn’t have guessed any of them.

    What are are you a teacher of?😱

    tinybits
    Member

    I was in the same class as this delightful individual….

    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.northantstelegraph.co.uk/news/nspcc-putting-desborough-sex-attackers-behind-bars-is-not-enough-1-7732284/amp

    im now pleased I never got on with him and had the odd scrap (which in fairness didn’t go that well for me as he was a big lad for his age)

    Premier Icon Ambrose
    Subscriber

    Been teaching for 29 years now, three of my ex pupils have been convicted of murder.

    And far too many, far, far too many have ended their own life.

    ton
    Member

    where to begin,

    in my last year of school, 3 lads i grew up with went glue sniffing after a burglary spree. a argument ended with 2 of them murdering the other. beat him to death with baseball bats.

    about 20 years ago, my cousin, who was a drug addict was sentenced to 18 years after stabbing his dealer to death. i have not seen him since his release.

    and in the 60’s my mothers cousin strangled his wife and dumped her body in a toilet somewhere on the north yorkshire moors.

    1 bad choice can ruin many lives.

    Premier Icon jekkyl
    Subscriber

    As regards the Op if it’s the one from N-u-L… I regularly ride my bike past or through that quarry near Caverswall on my way to Parkhall… I was out on my bike the Sunday after she went missing…if I had taken a different route…

    Rockhopper
    Member

    A client of our stabbed his wife to death then managed to inherit six figures from her will.  He was a lawyer though…

    Tom B
    Member

    Yup that’s the one Jekkyl….I used to ride that way a couple of times a week. Still a very bizarre feeling today tbh.

    RS4KEV
    Member

    What are are you a teacher of?

    I was thinking that too, psychology ?

    Premier Icon cynic-al
    Subscriber

    Has a client who’d been convicted of murder (not a legal client), seemed an OK bloke, claimed innocence I think, said it had ruined his life.

    Premier Icon honeybadgerx
    Subscriber

    In another bizarre coincidence, @OP, one of my other half’s best pals is a midwife and worked with the victim, I think we even met her around her pal’s wedding. Does kinda hit home a bit really.

    hedley
    Member

    If you want an interesting read with so many twists and turns…

    My lecturer at Uni (Napier in Edinburgh) was Paul Agutter, an utterly brilliant man, captivating, funny, caring and the best lecturer. We spent a lot of time with him not just in his classes but socially and in evening drinks/Biochemistry workshops.

    He went on to to try to kill his wife (in an open relationship, his mistress was a former student from one of his courses) by adding deadly nightshade to bottles of tonic water in Safeway which went on to poison 8 people and caused a lot  of panic at the time in Edinburgh.

    The story is quite bizarre, especially as he ended up in jail with the same man who had falsely confessed to poisoning the tonic water but had been removed from the investigation.

    Upon his release, Paul Agutter went on to teach Ethics at Manchester.

    I know this is a link to the Daily Record but their article is the most in-depth out of all of the papers at the time.

    https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/a-gin-and-tonic-laced-with-deadly-nightshadewho-961080

    wl
    Member

    A senior psychiatric nurse I worked with once worked at Pentonville Prison for a while.  He said the majority of murderers he came across were just surprisingly regular guys who’d made one huge and catastrophic mistake in the heat of the moment, despite otherwise unremarkable lives. Quite sad really.

    cchris2lou
    Member

    One of my former teacher tried to kill his wife and children by putting arsenic in pancakes. Luckily he did not put enough and they survived. After a few years in jail, his family pardonned himand carried on with family life.

    He was in debt and ending it all was the only solution he could think of.

    Squidlord
    Member

    I’ve got a cat, if that counts.

    I went to school with Ian Huntley… he didn’t turn out well

    MTB-Idle
    Member

    a lot of my extended family work or worked in Broadmoor (prison for the criminally insane that housed amongst others the yorkshire ripper).

    My uncle Jim (RIP) was an ex-chippy turned warden and taught the prisoners woodwork. At family parties he never, ever, ever stood anywhere other than with his back to the wall.

    haggis1978
    Member

    Wow. Didn’t realise so many people had experiences like this.  An old school friend of mine did time for murder.  Had been ran over by a motorbike at age 12. In a coma for weeks.  When he came round he wasn’t properly diagnosed and thought he only had mild brain damage, if there is such a thing. Years later after 17 years in prison and further scans and it turns out he can’t control his emotions and can’t switch off.  Basically goes ballistic. We always though he was just mad as a box of frogs but not in a dangerous way.  He left our hometown.  Got in tow with some mad cow who convinced him her dad abused her.  The dad attacked attacked him with a rolling pin.  He retaliated at a later date.  Man died. Trial was an absolute joke. Hospital lost his medical records telling of accident when he was a kid. What we know now is he should have been getting treatment from when he had his accident.  He’s now living in sheltered housing after receiving treatment at a brain injury unit for 4-5 years. Has PTSD,  is a paranoid schizophrenic and bi-polar as a result of his time inside on top of the brain injury.  Tragic story on both sides.  Still go to see him when I can. Went from being a cat D prisoner to cat A fairly quick.  Other prisoners tormented him.  He had to become a certain way in order to survive inside. Dont know why I’m blurting this all out on here but I guess not all people are equal.  Some deserve what they get,  some don’t.

    FunkyDunc
    Member

    Surgeon or divorce lawyer, I’ve heard both cost and arm and a leg?

    Also gets involved with a lot of murderers too.  Prison Officers don’t tell her what they have done, but they do kind of give the nod about which ones to keep at arms length.  Googling after has brought up some ‘interesting’ characters.

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