Handed in notice, what would you do?

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  • Handed in notice, what would you do?
  • dooosuk
    Member

    The way I see it, you either want a new job/challenge or you don’t.

    Only you can make the decision. Sounds like you’ll be better off moving to me and the MD has just reeled off all the usual lines.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    I’ve always found that if I’ve decided to go then I’m going, sooner or later.

    They may keep you for another six months with more money or whatever but your heart is already elsewhere and you’ll follow it in time.

    Decide where you’d be happiest. [/end of thread]

    My 2p is go for the new job. I stuck at a job for 12 years where the Management kept dangling carrots for me in a “this time next year” way. I was stupid not to get out sooner.

    slowoldgit
    Member

    So the MD takes an interest when he realises he’s about to lose you. Expect that interest to fade when he thinks he’s going to keep you.

    Premier Icon thepurist
    Subscriber

    Did you really start looking for a new job because the current one didn’t offer enough money or the right role, or was it because of other issues with the politics & way the place is being run? That’s your answer.

    Don’t forget the feeling you had when you made the decision to look for and apply for another job and don’t forget how you felt when you were offered the new job that you wanted.

    It’s easy to forget the motivation for the move in the first place but making that decision then applying/attending An interview etc isn’t something that just happens in passing. You have to be very determined that you want a new career/to leave your current employment.

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Subscriber

    try the new job.

    if the ‘old’ MD is really serious about keeping you, he’ll come begging.

    But I’d be a fool not to throw something ‘within reason’ on the table….

    10k rise, and Fridays off.

    atlaz
    Member

    I always think it sets a bad precedent when you resign to take more money to stay (unless that was the only reason you were leaving) as it says you can be bought off. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve offered people money to keep them and had it accepted on a number of occasions, but as an employer it leaves me thinking about the employee’s motives and as an employee, when someone makes that offer it tells me they know I was underpaid. Which ever way you cut it, unless it’s a show stopping sum of money, I’d take the new role.

    wl
    Member

    New job. Hating your job sucks, and there’s way more to life than dosh.

    DougD
    Member

    I have just got into a rut … which I don’t really get on with and puts massive stress on working day and outside …Loads of internal politics, new people brought in who haven’t a clue and the ‘old guard’ not given a sniff, just left in the dark

    vs

    total change with a view to be fast tracked into other areas, lights my fire more than the current job it just feels right

    Change

    Premier Icon curiousyellow
    Subscriber

    Think about it like this.

    If you were applying for your current job, then would it be one you’d want to do for the extra money?

    jockthestore
    Member

    As if you don’t have enough advice pointing you in the right direction…. I was in a very similar position and I didn’t look back. Your outlook on work, as well as life may well change for the better too. Don’t let yourself get stuck in a rut, do it.

    theflatboy
    Member

    New job sounds better all round. New job.

    glupton1976
    Member

    he said he knows family that works in the same area as the new job and said its not all its made out to be,

    This would see me out the door regardless. He sounds like a proper gobshite.

    According to your post, there are people who are there who are the main reason for going. List them and the reasons. Hand the list to MD, tell them they go or you do.

    Then see what happens.

    EDIT. And what I’d do is hand in my notice and leave. being referred to the MD because my boss couldn’t deal with it is another reason to go IMO

    atlaz
    Member

    According to your post, there are people who are there who are the main reason for going. List them and the reasons. Hand the list to MD, tell them they go or you do.

    Sorry, but that would just make him look like a knob. By all means be honest in the exit interview but why act like a dick?

    glupton1976
    Member

    Why would being honest be considered acting like a dick?

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    he said he knows family that works in the same area as the new job and said its not all its made out to be

    Now that is someone being a dick. Leave.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    “Yeah Ok, bye now.”

    valleyman
    Member

    Bit of a mad one as my head is a bit wrecked, I think I know the answer deep down but for some reason asking for advice…

    To keep it short

    Current job-

    Nearly 10 years service, good pay for what I do, technical sales + look after the network, I have just got into a rut, trouble is which adds a bit of a spin on it is its owned by a family member (typical david brent hasn’t a clue) which I don’t really get on with and puts massive stress on working day and outside, were amicable but don’t exactly go for pints. Loads of internal politics, new people brought in who haven’t a clue and the ‘old guard’ not given a sniff, just left in the dark.

    New Job –

    Been accepted for emergency control room job in local centre, total change with a view to be fast tracked into other areas, lights my fire more than the current job it just feels right. Roughly 6k pay decrease but this is counteracted by the wife going back 5 days a week and child care ending so saving extra £300 there so after working everything out were actually up by a few quid. After a year wages go up and with shift allowance etc.

    Handed my notice in with ‘family member’ couldn’t take it in, brain melted, said he needs to talk to MD (who runs the show) who is/was on hols.

    Came in first thing chatted to MD, he said he was shocked does not want to loose me, he said he knows family that works in the same area as the new job and said its not all its made out to be, bigger doesn’t mean better same polotics. Then gave me the line, were small, approachable and were starting to do things. He said I do not want to see you go, you have experience that I don’t want to loose.

    He ended by saying “what can I do to make you stay, money, change of roll etc” – “have a think and come back to me” – I turned it round and said “well no offence but what am I worth to you” he said “im an open book, decide what you want then chat”

    He seemed to be making the right noises but I know of him from his old job through a mate and he is a bit of a, well not billy bull***er but he’s the kind of guy that wants his piece of meat in return?

    My heart is set on this new job and as a mate in work said even if they paid you an extra 10k your still coming in on the Monday morning to the same sh*T! But I’d be a fool not to throw something ‘within reason’ on the table….

    Cheers

    Ps- I know im in a fortunate position and it could be far worse…..

    valleyman
    Member

    cheers all, i have been trying to get out for years, i applied for crappy IT/Sales jobs but i never felt right.

    I think the post above sums it up..

    Don’t forget the feeling you had when you made the decision to look for and apply for another job and don’t forget how you felt when you were offered the new job that you wanted.

    i was ecstatic, i was even jumping through hoops when i saw the advert on line!

    or was it because of other issues with the politics & way the place is being run

    this is the case! its not the cash.

    he said he knows family that works in the same area as the new job and said its not all its made out to be,

    This would see me out the door regardless. He sounds like a proper gobshite.

    didnt think of it that way… hmmmm made me think there, before he said that he said “not meaning to put you off in anyway… but..”

    + i found out on the grapevine they are looking to move the factory, loosing the IT guy before this would be a nightmare would it not

    i was ecstatic, i was even jumping through hoops when i saw the advert on line!

    Then that says it all doesn’t it. Onwards and upwards.

    Its a toss up. Where do you draw the line between enjoyment and less money and less enjoyment but more money and just working for the readies. Thats what I do – well paid job in IT. I hate computers but am good at what I do. Work to live. Don’t live to work…

    Riofer
    Member

    I was in a similar position a couple of years ago and like you spent some time thinking overthe decision. One bit of internet searching turned up a stat that something over 50% of people who withdrew a resigniation to stay in job after being offered more money left the business within 6 months. This seems to reflect the advice above that if you only stay for the money the reasons why you wanted to leave will still be there and something changes in the employee/employer relationship.

    Whatever you choose – best of luck.

    jekkyl
    Member

    everyone hates working* so hate the job the job that pays the best.

    *unless you’re an artist, musician, author, actor etc.

    the teaboy
    Member

    I was in a similar position and found this: http://www.edgarcowen.com/Job-Seekers/resignation

    Once you have resigned here are some strategies that can be used by employers.

    •Offering more money to stay- This is a classic ‘buy back’ scenario. What you must consider that most people don’t work for money alone. Think carefully of the reasons why you were looking to leave your current role in the first place, have these reasons changed because you’re being offered more money? Will these reasons have changed in a few months time?

    •Offering a promotion to stay- What kind of a promotion would it actually be if you had to resign in order to get it? Again you must consider your reasons for leaving your employer in the first place and also what it will take to get further promotions in the future

    •Mocking your choice of employer- This is really a last chance saloon from your current employer and the mockery is as a result of their personal insecurities with your choice rather than anything that could be particularly wrong with your future employers. An employer at this stage may also try some form of emotional blackmail by saying that they won’t be able to cope without you or you’ll be letting the team down.

    Made the decision easy for me!

    Just been through a similar thing. New job (which I have taken) was slightly more pay, but more of a challenge, and like a few people on here have said, I had carrots dangled in front of me for a while but nothing materialised. They did ask me if there was anything they could offer to make me stay, but at the end of the day, there were things I didn’t want to put up with any more. end of.

    Premier Icon surroundedbyhills
    Subscriber

    A moving target is harder to hit! Look forwards the fact that they can’t embrace you leaving says they are not going to change!

    TuckerUK
    Member

    I think jobs are a lot like relationships, once you’ve got that nagging doubt, it’s over. Move on.

    P.S. A decent boss (e.g. me) would have made you happy before you threatened to leave.

    Pyro
    Member

    i found out on the grapevine they are looking to move the factory, loosing the IT guy before this would be a nightmare would it not

    Yes, and it’s very noble of you to think that, but this is about what’s best for YOU, not them.

    I was in a similar position five years ago. I’d been sick to the back teeth of some of the people I worked with. A few people knew I was wanting to head off, but the bosses thought they could keep me by finally giving me the promotion I’d been working for for a couple of years. I took it, took the wage for a month then handed in my notice and jumped ship. It left them very short handed, as the only person who could do what I was doing was my missus, and she left a week later. But hey, I’m clear of it, away from the morons who put me there in the first place, and I’ve never regretted it. Screw them, if you feel you need to leave, leave.

    PS – “It’s not all it’s cut up to be” sounds like sour grapes to me. Your ‘boss’ I’d ineffective and your MD sounds like a nobber. Get gone.

    atlaz
    Member

    Why would being honest be considered acting like a dick?

    Handing a list of people and problems and saying “Fire them or I’m off” isn’t being a dick? I said, be honest in the exit interview but the suggested course of action was shit.

    valleyman
    Member

    cheers all, well after a liquid lunch decided to tell them to stick it where the sun don’t shine..

    the wife did say wait until the morning though 😉

    it may be the best or worst decision of my life but i wont know unless i go for it…

    roll on 7.30am!

    Premier Icon Stuuey
    Subscriber

    Never accept a counter offer. You were not valuable enough to be given a rise before you gave notice. Things won’t change so you will remain frustrated. They may get worse as you ‘dumped’ your work mates then held the boss to ransom for a pay rise. You’ve moved up the list of people who will get the boot if the company gets into trouble. If you do eventually leave they won’t have you back. You’ve accepted an offer from another company and then withdrawn it before you started, another potential future employer who won’t have you back. Not the best career move.

    If they need you for a few weeks longer to help prepare them/ do a longer handover for the move then you could discuss this with your new employer. This type of discussion shouldn’t do you any harm with either company.

    Edited to say – Good choice! left the above as it may help.

    CountZero
    Member

    Once you have resigned here are some strategies that can be used by employers.

    •Offering more money to stay- This is a classic ‘buy back’ scenario. What you must consider that most people don’t work for money alone. Think carefully of the reasons why you were looking to leave your current role in the first place, have these reasons changed because you’re being offered more money? Will these reasons have changed in a few months time?

    •Offering a promotion to stay- What kind of a promotion would it actually be if you had to resign in order to get it? Again you must consider your reasons for leaving your employer in the first place and also what it will take to get further promotions in the future

    •Mocking your choice of employer- This is really a last chance saloon from your current employer and the mockery is as a result of their personal insecurities with your choice rather than anything that could be particularly wrong with your future employers. An employer at this stage may also try some form of emotional blackmail by saying that they won’t be able to cope without you or you’ll be letting the team down.

    Looks like they are working to the script!
    Best out of there, good luck with the new job, and, as you say, screw ’em! 😀

    Premier Icon midlifecrashes
    Subscriber

    If you want to stay, £15k rise, Friday afternoons off, no “on call” time. David Brent to step aside and hire an experienced successful manager from the sector and put in a decent training programme for the new guys. That and an Audi/Bongo/Berlingo/Defender/OldFastMerc of choice to suit your particular STW niche. Run, don’t burn your bridges, but don’t look back either.

    Congratulations, BTW, things are about to get better!

    badnewz
    Member

    Congratulations, all the best for your new role 🙂

Viewing 36 posts - 1 through 36 (of 36 total)

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