Getting the weight down!

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  • Getting the weight down!
  • Premier Icon weeksy
    Subscriber

    neither… sell it all and buy a lighter bike.

    Swapping bits simply doesn’t do the job well or financially viably.

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Subscriber

    rep341 – Member

    Thoughts on best way to improve the weight

    buy a lighter bike. what he ^ said, you can spend a ****ing fortune on lighter parts.

    or, get over it; you’ve got a great bike, spend your money on trips away to ride the arse off it.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    Weight everything, get weights of anything you might swap and the price.

    Thats the only way really you will get an idea about how much the build can go down on the frame.

    140mm trail bike here 28-29lb in AM mode, the missus has the same one 27-28lb with carbon frames.

    Things to look at tyres, 2x/3x? what about 1x with an expanded rear 10sp. Shimano cranks? Look at some of the SRAM carbon cranks.

    Wheels can be good but again weigh what you have first.

    Premier Icon cloudnine
    Subscriber

    Depends whether you are buying new or 2nd hand.
    Wheels and tyres are a good place to start.
    What do your wheels weigh with tyres now?

    Premier Icon brassneck
    Subscriber

    Bet you could lose a kilo cheaper and easier than the bike 🙂

    Sounds like your bike is a bit overkill for what you do (from your description), so I’d sell up and buy something lighter/shorter travel. I went back to a hardtail, and am really enjoying it so far. Not found it limiting at trail centers either.

    sync
    Member

    Mid-Long travel trail bikes will weigh 27-33lbs as a rule.

    The whole point of owning one is being man enough to pedal up hill and ballsy enough to pedal fast down.

    Best bet is to buy a sorted light 100mm xc machine, don the lycra and some 640mm bars then enjoy.

    Premier Icon mrblobby
    Subscriber

    What brassneck said, that’s a lot of bike for what you’re riding. Sounds a lot like what I use a 25lbs 120mm HT for.

    May be worth looking at bits other than frame, forks and wheels though. E.g. tyres and tubes.

    Oh, and have a poo 🙂

    rocketman
    Member

    Thoughts on best way to improve the weight

    Instead of concentrating on weight loss, why not make it easier to ride in a different kind of way?

    As above if you change components and focus on the grams you will end up with a horrible clothes horse of a bike that may be light but it will also be unbalanced. If you’re happy with the geometry and feel of your Intense, have a close look at the things that make it draggy – basically the drivetrain as well as the wheels/tyres and to some extent the brakes.

    I went through this exercise in 2012 with my Scott Voltage FR. It’s an animal and in standard form it weighs a ton. I tried swapping the wheels and forks for lighter items and although the bike was lighter it felt awful. Purely by chance I fitted a lighter chainring and a superlight KMC chain and immediately although the bike wasn’t that much lighter it felt a whole lot easier to pedal. I followed this with cranks, BB, wheels (similar weight to the originals but better hubs), tyres, tubes, cassette and pedals and the difference was amazing – maybe a kg or two off the total weight but so much easier to ride. The final piece of the jigsaw was the brakes – there was nothing obviously wrong with the std Elixirs but some new Shimanos made sure there was absolutely nothing dragging

    What have now is a bike that isn’t that much lighter than std but is really easy to pedal and still feels really stiff and solid

    rep341
    Member

    Thanks- this does sound like I have to sell up or swap and get a 120mm bike like a Camber or similair?
    I would be buying second hand- ideally just need to find someone that wants to go burly from more XC type and swap 🙂

    rep341
    Member

    Its has some nice parts on it
    Formual The One Brakes
    XO shifters

    But I think everything else is burly
    Pikes- Burly!
    Straitline MTB Cut special edition Flats – burly
    Renthal Bars – burly

    And so on

    think I am too stuck back in the days when I did uplift days on SX Trails and DH bikes- now I use the suspension etc to get me out of trouble- time for a change!

    rep341
    Member

    I have my 140mm travel trail bike- but its a bit portly!
    Intense 5.5 EVP
    Currently has 20mm dual air pikes 426
    Sun Ringle Charger Expeert wheelset

    So do I
    A- Change frame
    B- Keep frame and change forks then wheels

    Or sell the lot and start all over again!
    Thoughts on best way to improve the weight
    I mainly ride all stuff – XC race course, trail centre and OS map loops

    transition1
    Member

    Upgrading to lighter components & carbon won’t make you faster
    Bottom line… Fitness is what makes you faster along with rider skill. Rest is a tiny percentage

    jonnouk
    Member

    Upgrading to lighter components & carbon won’t make you faster
    Bottom line… Fitness is what makes you faster along with rider skill. Rest is a tiny percentage

    The other option is to lose weight yourself.

    My “XC” hardtail bike weighs 34lbs. Most of that is in the forks and wheels. I started to look for lighter replacements around christmas and realised I didn’t want to spend the money. I lost 11 lbs instead and put even heavier wheels on (D321).

    steve_b77
    Member

    Depends on if you want real / actual weight or Internet forum bragging weight.

    Slinging a load of expensive lightweight parts on will make it Internet forum light, starting with a light bike / frame will give you an actual / real light weight bike.

    The choice is yours

    russianbob
    Member

    Just weighed my Heckler which I use for everything but mainly XC/Trails stuff. 36lb!!! Still manage to pedal in up just about everywhere, even though I am the slowest in our group. At least everyone gets a breather while they’re waiting for me to summit every climb.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Thing is, you can lose weight or gain fitness but that doesn’t make a heavy bike ride like a light bike, there are other advantages than just climbing/speed (and also, some disadvantages mind)

    Premier Icon chickenman
    Subscriber

    I would suggest not getting a lighter fork. I used to run a Revelation that was a pound lighter than the Lyrik I use currently; I will not be going back!
    Tyres vary between 500-1500 grammes; put some Ignitors on for XC riding.

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