Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 91 total)
  • Getting car costs down… :(
  • Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    I have just worked out we spent £12k last year on two cars to do 30k annually (loan, insurance, tax, fuel, maintenance etc). What is your spend?

    FFS. It is an absolute mugs game. Think how many shiny bikes that would buy!

    Premier Icon oldtennisshoes
    Full Member

    That’s 40p per mile. Does that include buying the cars and depreciation?

    Mine works out at 41.6 a mile for all costs, based on the 25k miles I did last year
    (18 plate Audi A6).

    My new gig is commutable by train which is going to reduce costs significantly.

    Premier Icon Trailrider Jim
    Full Member

    If you can, start saving to buy future ones with cash. Too many parties involved in modern car financing, all wanting their slice of your hard-earned.

    Premier Icon 33tango
    Full Member

    Luckily and perhaps unusually(?) we are a one car family. My monthly spend for my railcard is £70 and I think we pay around £300 per month for the car: the car is a couple of years old, with a small loan on it and we don’t drive big distances at all

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Does that include buying the cars and depreciation

    Struggling to include depreciation as the loan payments are more than depreciation, but cars are not assets imo. I’ve included the loan costs.
    Arguably the cost per year will go down if we sell at some point.

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Full Member

    About £3.5k to do about 12,000 miles, at a guess. Perhaps a touch more but I don’t monitor fuel spend and consumption.

    Purchased the vehicles outright about six years ago so that cost is amortized now.

    I spend another £1.3k on trains, roughly.

    Premier Icon iainc
    Full Member

    Just done the maths and we are a little more, just shy of £14k, 2 nice cars on pcp’s and total combined mileage of just under 30k. I do get a car allowance which covers almost half the spend mind you.

    Premier Icon n0b0dy0ftheg0at
    Free Member

    As much as we’ve missed having a car for ~8 years for doing localish visits to places on days off work; a couple of visits a year to see family; weekly bulk shopping etc. , most of its use was simply commuting me ~50 miles a week back then… Which probably takes me no longer these days and I feel much better for cycle commuting instead!

    Annually paying ~£200 VED; ~£250 insurance; ~£750 fuel; ~£50 MOT + replacements etc. would massively reduce our disposable income. I’d rather have our spring midweek Center Parcs annual hol, my road bike and turbo plus a bit of savings!

    Premier Icon Houns
    Full Member

    Also work out how many hours/days you’ve spent driving (I used a conservative 30mph average figure)

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Free Member

    Car bought for £900. No depreciation.
    Fixed costs (tax & insurance) are £600 a year.
    Other costs are fuel & maintenance (only consumables – tyres, oil, filters and brakes).

    Annual mileage is around 5000, which is about £1000 a year in fuel (big car, big powerful motor). At those mileages the consumables last about 5 years).

    So about £1700 a year for me.

    So, I dunno…. Drive less and in an old car? My car is 15 years old but a nice place to be and drive (Saab 95 aero)…

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    As above – older car. Repair costs are still fair less than new car costs.

    Premier Icon duncancallum
    Full Member

    Buy a 2nd hand car for cash.

    Maintain it at a good indy garage

    Cheapest way to car ownership

    Or buy a 300snotter run till dead weigh in and repeat

    Premier Icon sadexpunk
    Full Member

    Buy a 2nd hand car for cash.

    Maintain it at a good indy garage

    Cheapest way to car ownership

    is the right answer. ive got a cost neutral company car at the mo, but had a 57 octy before. cost me next to nowt over the 6 years i had it luckily.
    wife drives a cash-bought 06 nissan note (jap/petrol, apparently the cheapest combo to maintain), drives around 5,000 miles per year, just had it serviced at the local indy. service plus a replacement of the back of the exhaust was £120 all in! tax and ins relatively cheap too, so its a no-brainer for her (fingers crossed).

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Buy a 2nd hand car for cash.

    Both are 2012 /13 cars. We own one outright, the other on a loan for less than it is worth. I am the king of keeping costs down. For example, the new discs and pads have been bought last month in a massive sale and the indy garage will fit them the week before the MOT.

    I wouldn’t have the bigger/newer car if I hadn’t been doing 25k a year for the last 6 years. It does seem daft to sell it to only buy a bangernomics car now…?

    Insurance costs are high with an 18 year old and about to be 17 year old…

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    My milage has fluctuated between 30k and 3k over the last few years! So this is a but if an average.

    40mpg of petrol means 15p/mile of petrol. Say 12000 miles, £1800

    Tax £220

    Depreciation £0 (realistically its at the stage where its worth ‘something’ but that fluctuates based on how long the mot is).

    Insurance £300

    Mot £50

    Repairs, tyres, brake pads, servicing £200 (averaged).

    So about £2600 per year, 22p/mile.

    Getting that down would be nerve wracking or difficult. I could swap to a more complex diesel, but at circa 140,000 miles that would potentially offsetting the big fuel number (perhapse reducing it by £600 at 65mpg?) But theres a high likelihood that the repair bill goes up and the capital expenditure feeds into the depreciation.

    N.b even if you averaged if over my entire ownership depreciation is only £500/year over 8 years. That’s only adding 4p/mile.

    Basicly if you want to halve your costs, buy a cheaper car and keep it a long time. Staying on the Pcp bandwagon with a leather seated german whip (to quote one of the pleothora of shit rap songs about **** german cars of the past few years) is the mugs game bit.

    Around £2200/month for 2 vehicles, 1 driver 😭😂

    One is used for work though and the costs covered by the business.

    Make the total £5100/month if you add in the other 2 work vans – they are hire vans though 😬

    I should really reduce that

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    Ohh and the best bit of cheap car ownership and high milages was doing daft things like a return kit delivery to ft William, and making £400 profit at 45p/mile.

    That car has paid for itself in 45p’s four or five times over. Thats sensible car economics treating it as an asset. As soon as you start talking about newer and nicer, or any letters after the numbers bit in the model name, thats when its costing you money.

    Zetec (alloy wheels and a heated screen, phwoarrr) 2006 1.6 Cmax.

    Premier Icon singletrackmind
    Full Member

    19.1p a mile
    This includes mot, tax, ins, fuel, servicing, tyres and an arbitrary but second highest weekly cost for wear and tear and depreciation
    2.4td estate 52mpg, me doing spanners

    Premier Icon kcal
    Full Member

    My last car I reckoned worked out around 40p / mile (very very loosely). That was Saab 900S, bought s/h, and run into the ground over the next 12/3 years until it was sold for scrap. Not sure but I reckon a standard make/model, and sell before costs get too high, would help. But does seem likely to be ballpark figure.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    Depreciation doesn’t exist until you actually need to sell it.

    It’s hypothetical at best.

    People delude them selves that it’s ok because it’s still worth X and they will always get a chunk of their money back

    Then some nugget crashes into them and insurance says it’s only worth a much smaller X.

    There’s a whole segment of the finance industry based on convincing you your cars worth more than it is so you buy another.

    I always work on it being worth zero by the time I’m finished with it…after all I wouldn’t “upgrade” my washing machine for the sake of it like some folk do with cars. The car is just a tool.

    Basic cars , small cars , run over long periods. Minimal electrics, don’t change it because your bored, fix small noises/warning lights before they become costly issues

    My old white van was in the region of 20p a mile over its life span.

    The wife’s Peugeot is much higher per mile at the moment but next year it’ll be paid off and on 40k. So should be another 6-8 years to balance the books.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    For math

    Year 1 including entire purchase , mot , tax , fuel , insurance and winter tire set up.

    It was 80 pence a mile In year 1

    Year 2 it was 47 pence a mile

    Year 3 it’ll be 36 pence a mile assuming no major failures this year.

    Premier Icon twinw4ll
    Free Member

    Our family car is a Toyota Avensis was bought in 2008 cost £5800 I think it’s been serviced about six times, it’s also had a new battery and wipers when needed, never let us down.
    I’ve got a Toyota Hiace i paid £900 pounds for it three years ago, costs so far apart from the usual tax, fuel, ins has been £100 for two new tires.

    Premier Icon P-Jay
    Full Member

    Costs £5568 for PCP, Maint and fuel.

    Income £5148 in Car Allowance and travel expenses.

    Did 11k miles. £420 out of my own pocket for personal mileage, but it’s skewed because I was very lucky on maintenance.

    Haven’t needed any tyres in the last 12 months which is going to sting because they’re 19s

    I’ve also got to spend £200 on a service for my gearbox as it’s not covered by the car service or the service pack I bought with it…

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    I wouldn’t “upgrade” my washing machine for the sake of it like some folk do with cars. The car is just a tool.

    You say that, but ive never bought a new washing machine either!

    Either people have been getting a new kitchen, been made paranoid by stories of them busting into flames so want the new one with a warranty, or moving between rented accommodation where one is supplied in the new home.

    Also like cars the current one is a bangermonics lemon, its got rust issues, worn bearings, and is just a shit washing machine (despite being a posh, but not german, one!). Already got its replacement lined up though as someones moving house and offered it for free 😂

    Premier Icon Edukator
    Free Member

    Old Zoé cost 3500e/year all in. New Zoé should cost about the same over 3-5 years under guarantee, it’ll depend on the trade-in deal. Mileage makes little difference as elctricity is cheap. If I keep it for 10 years (edited) and then throw it away it’ll be about 3300e/year – if there’s any residual left at all then it’ll have cost less.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    I wouldn’t “upgrade” my washing machine for the sake of it like some folk do with cars. The car is just a tool.

    A better washing machine makes no difference to your life. A better car is generally nicer and more comfortable to drive – otherwise it doesn’t qualify as better IMO. You may end up having to spend quite some time in it. Compare it to bikes – your bike is probably incredibly expensive compared to what most people are prepared to pay, but we all know it can be worth it.

    I had an £800 Passat, not quite a banger. I used to drive to a job 140 miles away every week. When I got the current Passat (3 years old/£10k at the time) the first trip in it was an absolute breeze – came home refreshed and relaxed. Similar to the way a good bike is better than a cheap one.

    However a better car needn’t cost that much more. My neighbour’s 330d is the same age as mine and cost the same. He just bought it 2 years later. We both still own them 10 years later, his is still a 330d mine is still a Passat.

    Premier Icon singlespeedstu
    Full Member

    A Yaris is the answer…
    Though I know you already know that having owned a Yaris.
    Mrs stu bought a new Yaris for 12 grand ran it for 15 years and only ever spent money on general servicing, a few sets of brake pads and one set of discs.(Edit and a hand brake cable.)
    Never broke down and still hasn’t with the new owner thats had it for another 4 years.
    Average milage was around 10,000
    I have no idea how my cars do on this test as they’re company lease cars that do 45,000 and really are a tool.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    A better washing machine makes no difference to your life. A better car is generally nicer and more comfortable to drive – otherwise it doesn’t qualify as better IM

    Define better.

    For me better is simply more reliable , possibly more efficient and importantly – not at end of useful life like the one it replaced.

    Once you get your head around cars will explode after 3 years and having to have a new one every 3 years you realise that car ownership is actually far too cheap in this country which is why people use them for unnesceary journeys that could easily be realised by other means

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    Define better.

    I did. Nicer and more comfortable to drive a long way. So that’s quieter, more comfortable/adjustable seats, easier controls, better ride, better handling (if on country roads) better entertainment system e.g. ability to play Spotify, MP3s or podcasts, satnav, auto dimming rear view mirrors, better headlights etc etc. These things all reduce stress on long rides.

    Even something as simple as the seat fore-aft adjustment. In the Prius I want the seat in between two of the clicks which I can’t do – in the Passat the clicks are much finer so I can get it where I want. Steering wheel also moves in and out which means I can get more comfortable.

    If you’re immune to all this stuff on a long drive then you’re lucky. But I feel better after a long drive in a better car. But like I say, better doesn’t have to mean new and expensive. I mean, I could have bought a new Yaris or a 3 year old Passat. One’s obviously a better choice for my usage.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    They also all cost money and add complication and your hauling them round for all your non long journeys as well. Most of what’s listed are things to be avoided when you want cheap motoring.

    It’s alot like the old driving a huge car paying for your twice a year caravan holiday all year round.

    I am immune to it because I try to spend as little time in my car as possible.

    Premier Icon tiim
    Full Member

    Good timing – I just updated the van spreadsheet,

    58413 miles in 32 months,
    total cost of £11,474 including purchase cost (~1700), all fuel (~6253), Insurance, MOTs and consumables / repairs (~£3526)

    So ~£4300 / year for ~22000 miles.

    I have 70ish mile commute and drive a van for ease of bike carrying, event sleeping etc. It is 14 years old and not desirable but is comfortable, reliable, efficient, and I don’t mind chucking bikes in the back post race. I’ll probably replace it in the spring as I’d like slightly more length and electric windows but while it keeps working it is doing me fine.

    A bluetooth FM transmitter was the best £10 spent on it, most commutes are now podcasts for entertainment.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    A Yaris is the answer…

    Yes, yes it was. The Ibiza estate (old 1.4 16v, no turbo etc) is proving as good. We have had it 4 years and 50k and so far it has cost a rear damper, plus usual service and tyre costs.

    If there is one thing I am looking at is using the car less. Much less. Don’t know how. But less.

    Premier Icon chestrockwell
    Full Member

    Would hate to think but I like cars, like driving, don’t want to drive a shit box so all’s good.

    Premier Icon RustyNissanPrairie
    Full Member

    So that’s quieter, more comfortable/adjustable seats, easier controls, better ride, better handling (if on country roads) better entertainment system e.g. ability to play Spotify, MP3s or podcasts, satnav, auto dimming rear view mirrors, better headlights etc etc. These things all reduce stress on long rides.

    Even something as simple as the seat fore-aft adjustment. In the Prius I want the seat in between two of the clicks which I can’t do – in the Passat the clicks are much finer so I can get it where I want. Steering wheel also moves in and out which means I can get more comfortable.

    Our 2004 Volvo has all these. Bought for £6k 8 years ago, done 100k miles in our ownership (now on 185k) and no intention of ever selling. A joy to DIY spanner and service, big lazy unstressed petrol engine with no diesel foibles (injectors, turbo, DMF, etc), have been around for ages and have good forum info for when it does throw any issues up. Galvanized so doesn’t rust.

    Contrast to that is my 2007 Transit which is utter crap and has needed more spending on parts/repairs.
    Both are well bottomed out depreciation wise, DIY repairs and servicing keep costs to an absolute minimum.

    Premier Icon Hob Nob
    Free Member

    My car is approx £7k PA. Car allowance more than covers that, and mileage allowance covers a bit extra on top. All in, it’s a lot of money but fortunately it’s cost positive due to work.

    Other half’s car is about £4k PA. Also on a lease but a lot less miles and fuel to worry about. I’m at a point where I dislike cars so much I’m happy to pay for the privilege of driving it, and putting fuel in it & someone else can worry about the rest.

    I’ve done the bangernomics (and still do with our shed of a van for riding) and it annoys me intensely, always something not working, or needing fixing/replacing. Bored of that.

    Premier Icon chestrockwell
    Full Member

    I’ve done the bangernomics (and still do with our shed of a van for riding) and it annoys me intensely, always something not working, or needing fixing/replacing. Bored of that.

    I’m sort of doing this with our second car albeit with a banger that I always wanted bitd. Thought I’d enjoy maintaining it, fixing faults and restoring the bodywork but actually find it a bit of a chore. To do all the stuff I want to would be uneconomical and I’m just waiting for one of the common faults to pop up (whilst enjoying looking at it). It hasn’t gone wrong but if I kept it a while it would and I can’t really do without it day to day.

    Just ordered a electric car that will cost X a month, should just work and someone will fix/replace anything that needs it. Better.

    Premier Icon falkirk-mark
    Full Member

    Citroen c5 bought 7 years ago for £14000 (would get £2000 trade in) £1714 p.a
    Insurance roughly £250 p.a
    Tax £145 p.a
    mot repairs and servicing (myself) Guesstimate £350 p.a
    Fuel almost exactly 10 miles per litre, 11000 miles = 1100litres £1430 p.a
    Total running costs £ 3889 per annum

    Premier Icon bikebouy
    Free Member

    If there is one thing I am looking at is using the car less. Much less. Don’t know how. But less.

    So, will you change your UN to:

    matt_staysathomealotanddoesntdoworktrips

    ?

    Best of luck, cars and ownership thereof are hard things to own cheaply.

    Premier Icon muddyjames
    Free Member

    One to throw in the mix ; do airbags have a shelf life…

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Best of luck, cars and ownership thereof are hard things to own cheaply

    Indeed. Just surprised by quite how much we’ve been spending on the things…

    With a change in job its time to re-evaluate how much / why we spend.

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