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  • Garage Roof Repair – DIY for a mechanically useless IT muppet?
  • Premier Icon P-Jay
    Full Member

    As above really.

    Moved house a couple of weeks back, finally I own* my own garage – a blank canvass on which I can create my own masterpiece of clinically clean workshop cum, Vault-like Bike storage, cum somewhere for my wife to throw her gardening crap into all over my shit because she must clearly resent my happiness.

    It was ‘a bit damp’ when we viewed the place, “probably just needs a decent airing” I thought to myself, well the damp comes through the roof really quite freely and collects in huge puddles on the floor so short of a drought I can’t see airing is going to help.

    I don’t have much of a budget, what with all the other work going on in the house, so I’m tempted to have a go myself.

    I first removed a tree that was growing over and into it, which seemed to help, at least until the first heavy rain, but it’s still damp, 2mm to 3mm of dampness on the floor at the moment.

    It seems to be a metal corrugated roof over what looks to be corrugated asbestos sheets, which for obvious reasons I don’t want to mess about with. The water seems to pool at one end, the low end.

    Any guides, suggestions, or even calls to “don’t mess about with it, you’ll only hurt yourself and break it or even given yourself asbestosis you soft-handed pussy” as long as they come with an ballpark suggestion of what it would cost for someone with real-world practical skills to fix welcome.

    *I own just over 5% of it and a huge financial liability.

    Premier Icon jam-bo
    Full Member

    have you worked out where and how the water is getting in?

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Full Member

    tbh, if it’s leaking ‘all over’ you’re going to either end up putting a third roof over the whole lot or stripping it all off and starting again.

    I’d
    1) get the ‘asbestos’ tested to find out what it is.
    2) get some quotes to have it removed professionally.
    3) look at what’s involved in a DITY removel – if it’s in good nick and doesn’t crumble then bagging it up wouldn;t be too bad.

    If the asbestos is damaged you want it gone rather than raining asbestos dust down into your garage tbh.

    Do not do what a former colleague’s sister did – remove the asbestos roof and add it to the foundatiosn of the large patio they were digging. A neighbour dobbed them in and the council wrote saying they were welcome to bury it but it woudl be noted on their records to appear in any buidlign searches a future buyer might carry out. Having it all dug up cost *a lot*.

    Premier Icon sharkbait
    Free Member

    A couple of questions:
    1) what are the walls made of?
    2) what’s the roof structure made of, timber or angle iron/steel?
    3) if the 2 is timber then is it sound…. stick a screwdriver into it and see how hard it is.

    If it where mine, the walls where brick and good condition then I’d do the following:
    1) remove the corrugated metal roof
    2) remove the corrugated cement bound asbestos sheets. Take reasonable care over this – they will be held on by screws into a wooden roof structure or by J bolts if an angle iron structure. If the latter cut the bolts underneath the panels and pull out from above.
    Cement sheets are not weight bearing so don’t stand/kneel/sit on them. They are pretty heavy so it might be better with two of you. DO NOT go drilling/grinding/smashing them up. They are safe until turned to dust and inhaled in quantity.
    You may be able to dispose of the panels at your local tip but check first and you will need to double bag them. Alternatively you can pay to have them collected.

    3) once the roof covering is removed you could fit ply sheets and then a rubber finish, or go straight to plastic coated corrugated steel sheets in a suitably nice colour. If the latter, just watch for condensation coming off the roof if you don’t go with the felt lined sheets – which you should.

    End of the day, it’s not a difficult job at all and worth doing well. The only tricky bit is the disposal of the existing roof.

    1) get the ‘asbestos’ tested to find out what it is.

    No real need. It will be a very standard concrete/white asbestos sheet which has been used literally everywhere. Our last house had a garage with it on and our current place had it on a 60′ x 45′ barn.
    It will have cracked at the OPs place and started to leak (it cracks in the valleys of the corrugations). The, then, owners covered it over rather than just getting rid of it.

    Premier Icon finishthat
    Full Member

    As its coming up to the worst weather I, more wet/cold/dark I would fix a butyl or epdm pond liner over the roof and ventilate the inside as much as possible to try to reduce the damp and identify if its coming through the roof only and not the floor.
    Then you get time to plan and cost the replacement roof whilst you still have a dryish space to use.

    Premier Icon sharkbait
    Free Member

    they will be held on by screws into a wooden roof structure or by J bolts if an angle iron structure. If the latter cut the bolts underneath the panels and pull out from above.

    Edit: and when I had our big barn re-roofed the [professional] guys who did the job just cut the bolts off from above!!

    Premier Icon P-Jay
    Full Member

    A couple of questions:
    1) what are the walls made of?
    2) what’s the roof structure made of, timber or angle iron/steel?
    3) if the 2 is timber then is it sound…. stick a screwdriver into it and see how hard it is.

    1) It’s a concrete structure with a very convincing brick-looking outer skin and a tight cavity between the two.

    2) Angle Metal, it’s rusty and been patched with a bit of wood on a short bit. It appears to be the wettest part of the roof.

    Annoyingly, looking at Google Map images, the roof and door are less than 5 years old and bar the dirt they seem, externally at least, in good nick.

    Pic

    Premier Icon perchypanther
    Free Member

    No real need.

    Ignore this and get it tested.

    It costs about £30.

    I’ve met literally hundreds of people who were killed by that attitude to asbestos

    Premier Icon jag61
    Full Member

    I’ve been pricing new flat roof for detached single garage in Epdm with all facias and new timber looking at £1000 diy and as agreed with boss savings under budget are mine🤗

    Premier Icon sharkbait
    Free Member

    I’ve met literally hundreds of people who were killed by that attitude to asbestos

    So what if it’s white, blue or brown?
    The results would make no difference to the way in which you treat it’s removal.
    ‘Government’ advice

    Premier Icon philjunior
    Free Member

    If the new covering is leaking badly in <5 years, I’d be wondering what had/had not been done.

    Just bite the bullet now and get it dealt with, obviously make sure you take adequate precautions with asbestos whether going pro or DIY.

    You can worry about any water coming in from anywhere else once you’ve sorted the roof.

    Premier Icon dogbone
    Full Member

    I’m in the process of doing our garage. I took the asbestos off myself (tested it first just to check). Full suit, mask (proper one) and gloves. Used a multi tool (https://www.toolstation.com/bauker-300w-multi-cutter/p54984) to cut off the top of the bolts. Panels lifted off whole. All then double bagged ready for trip to council tip. Replacing it with galvanised corrugated steel panels (but also changing the direction of fall with some new block work).

    Premier Icon perchypanther
    Free Member

    The results would make no difference to the way in which you treat it’s removal.

    Unless it’s not asbestos at all.

    Premier Icon Scienceofficer
    Free Member

    clearly the existing roof has failed. Just overclad what’s there without disturbing the Corrugated cement sheets if they are asbestos. ( But they might be asbestolux depending on the age of the roof)

    Premier Icon stevied
    Full Member

    Did the surveyor pick up on the (possible) asbestos on the roof?
    Our surveyor missed fascia boards/soffits/undercloaking and, after going through arbitration, had to pay for all of our costs for the removal.
    Might be worth a look at the report?

    Premier Icon sharkbait
    Free Member

    Unless it’s not asbestos at all.

    But there’s nothing to lose by treating it as if it is (which it will be). What I was originally saying was to treat it as if it was asbestos, then it would make no difference if it was or wasn’t. Safety first.
    I have no ‘attitude’ to asbestos as you wrongly implied.

    Just overclad what’s there without disturbing the Corrugated cement sheets if they are asbestos.

    This is the easy route, but in the long run it would be better (funds allowing) to just replace it. If the OP sells the house in 10 years time the [now 10 years older and less intact] original roof may become more of an issue.

    Premier Icon Scienceofficer
    Free Member

    What I was originally saying was to treat it as if it was asbestos, then it would make no difference if it was or wasn’t. Safety first.

    The cost differential between these approaches is a enormous.

    Better to get it tested for 30 to 50 quid and know from there.

    Premier Icon sharkbait
    Free Member

    Not sure why. If you DIY it (and you certainly can) the the disposal methods are the same for whatever type of asbestos cement panels.
    We flipped a property that had a single garage made of asbestos cement panels on both the sides and roof.
    I did the dismantling of the building and stacked the roof/walls panels in the garden.
    Proper asbestos disposal company took everything away for £380 (this was in 2017).
    They didn’t test it, didn’t bother them as it’s all treated the same.
    Now if it’s asbestos that’s not bound with cement then that’s a different story.

    Premier Icon takisawa2
    Full Member

    They look like metal panels to me, the same thing those horrid Argos metal sheds are made from.
    They suffer horrendously from damp, so be sure it isn’t just damp first…

    I’d pop down the builders merchants & get a roll of heavy duty damp proofing membrane/polythene. Roll it over the top & secure it with battens around the sides. It will at least give you a dry garage till summer. Make sure it’s got some ventilation though.

    Then I’d leave it as is, board it over with OSB & cover it with EPDM.

    Premier Icon hols2
    Free Member

    I’ve met literally hundreds of people who were killed by that attitude to asbestos

    null

    Premier Icon airvent
    Free Member

    @sharkbait I think what he is saying is why assume its asbestos and pay hundreds of pounds to dispose of it when a 40 quid test may confirm it is non asbestos, which he could then dispose of for free at the local tip?

    Premier Icon sharkbait
    Free Member

    Maybe, but you can pretty much guarantee that all concrete roofing panels made before 1970 contained asbestos as it was the only way at the time to get the panels light enough.
    You don’t have to pay hundreds to dispose of it, many council tips will take it but it needs to be booked in and properly wrapped.
    The OPs garage is very common (we had one)…. It almost definitely will have asbestos in the roof – the tour different matter.
    It just needs taking down with a modicum of care (ie not smashing it to bits and wear a mask) and then wrapping.
    Hopefully he’s got a tip nearby that will accept it.
    I only added the cost of disposal to give an idea of what may be involved, I’d certainly try to DIY it myself.

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