from 2 bikes to 1 to do it all?

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  • from 2 bikes to 1 to do it all?
  • Premier Icon mrhoppy
    Subscriber

    Transition Bandit, perfect for trail centres and uk natural riding and mine is not feeling out of its depth chasing round the alps at the moment.

    wilko1999
    Member

    I have done this having previously had an Anthem and El Guapo to cover all my riding. Now just have a Blur LTc and the only thing I miss slightly is the out and out climbing speed of the Anthem. The Blur is truly fantastic though, a real do-it-all bike. Sturdy and stable on DH tracks, jumps well, pedals great on the flat/uphills and just seems super-fast and comfy doing everything. Doesn’t quite fall into the ‘modern geometry’ category, but it really doesn’t matter, its brilliant

    soobalias
    Member

    a mate of mine is borrowing my NP Mega at the moment, he finds it surprisingly rideable.

    or he did till he threw his leg over my HT

    Premier Icon coolhandluke
    Subscriber

    Anyone done this and lived to regret it?

    Just thinking of flogging my Enduro (see post on Enduro Woes) and my 456ti and getting a trail bike that will do the lot, UK riding, trail centres, Alp holidays.

    If such a bike exists, what is it? (please not a 5)

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Subscriber

    I tried to go from 2 bikes to 1. Like, really tried.

    I have 3 bikes 😳

    Premier Icon stilltortoise
    Subscriber

    Why not a Five? Serious – not trolling – question. They exist and are popular for exactly what you’re asking.

    Despite claims that “one bike to rule them all” is a mythical beast, for the vast vast majority of us the choice is staggering. You just need to decide which end of your riding spectrum is the most important. Will you be happier on a slightly less durable bike for your trips to the Alps, but one that will cruise around most of the UK trails and routes, or are you happy to have something a little harder work on the ups knowing it will be perfect for the Alpine trips?

    For me I decided it was pointless having an “Alp-proof” bike for the odd fantasy trip, so went with something that felt more suitable for the UK riding I do. I got a Bandit. It’s much better uphill than I expected it to be prior to riding it, but I wouldn’t be worried about taking it to the Alps…if the wife and kids allow it again 😉

    Premier Icon iainc
    Subscriber

    I went from a 5 and a RL853 to a Soul earlier this year. No regrets so far 🙂

    Premier Icon coolhandluke
    Subscriber

    You just need to decide which end of your riding spectrum is the most important. Will you be happier on a slightly less durable bike for your trips to the Alps, but one that will cruise around most of the UK trails and routes

    Nice question!

    I’d plump for the latter, a bike that cna cope with Alp trips but one that will cruise around most UK trails

    I just dont like 5’s much. had a sub 5 years ago, all my mates have Alpines or 5’s it seems. I like Commencal AM’s though and Bandits look sweet, just hoping the large is large enough….

    I_Ache
    Member

    I went from a Pitch and an Evil Sov to a 456. That lasted about 6 months and I had to get an FS again, I had the FS (an 06 Enduro) for 18 months before getting my BFe and loved having two bikes again. I now have an 11 Enduro Evo and the BFe (which is 18 months old) and I am very happy with them both.

    For me having two bikes is about how different they are to ride rather than what type of bike they are (XC/AM/DH/ETC). I pretty much ride both bikes in the same sort of places and they reward me in different ways, there are things that I prefer to do on one of them that I wouldn’t even bother with on the other, DH on the Enduro and BMX track on the BFe for instance.

    If I had to swap back to one bike ideally I would pick the Stumpjumper Evo Carbon 26 but sooner or later I would end up with two bikes again.

    Surely either a 456ti or Enduro would be perfect for a “do it all” bike?

    Van Halen
    Member

    earlier this year i stripped my 6″ FS bike and stopped riding hte HT as i got a old short travel commencal meta 4. Ive built a bit burly.

    lockout for the climbs, 130 at the front (its what i could lower my forks too easily! – i`d prefer 120) mahoosive bars. its bloody great and goes like a rocket downwards and much more efficient up too. dont really notice the reduction in travel. In theory its too small but i cant be doing with long bikes and i think it fits fine (i was worried when i bought it though)

    having said that i have just built teh HT up as a singlespeed for commuting/messing about. so i guess 1 bike is hard.

    b r
    Member

    I sold my Enduro frame but keep all the bits, have only ridden my 456TI for the past 5 years – but I’ve 2-3 ‘builds’ for it.

    Im in the process of doing just this. Sold a Trek Remedy and a Scott Spark with the aim of replacing them with an Epic 29. Which I would have if Specialized hadn’t run out in anticipation of their 2014 stock…..

    Premier Icon ddmonkey
    Subscriber

    If you want a bike for UK trails and to take to the Alps too then the Enduro you already have is it. I think you need to spend some time on the suspension set up and cockpit set up before you bin it for something else.

    PJM1974
    Member

    Tried it, it didn’t really work for me. The resulting bike was a compromise of conflicting priorities. I wanted a hard hitting trail bike and a lightweight XC bike, what I wound up with was a 29lb flexy trail bike with weak tyres and too short a top tube for me to consider all day rides on it. So I unretired my ’04 Enduro, built it up nice and light and let my AM bike grow until I was comfortable with it.

    And then I bought a do it all hardtail!

    BTW – I’ve responded to the Enduro thread, maybe you might consider a shock tune before you throw in the towel with it?

    persona
    Member

    it’s not the bike that’s the problem..

    There’s nothing you’d ride on your enduro that someone hasn’t already ridden on an appropriately strong/durable short travel hardtail.

    Premier Icon Normal Man
    Subscriber

    PJM1974 – Member

    Tried it, it didn’t really work for me. The resulting bike was a compromise of conflicting priorities. I wanted a hard hitting trail bike and a lightweight XC bike, what I wound up with was a 29lb flexy trail bike with weak tyres and too short a top tube for me to consider all day rides on it.

    Was that your Camber? I thought you liked that? (or am I mixing up your username with someone else 😳 )

    PJM1974
    Member

    Was that your Camber? I thought you liked that? (or am I mixing up your username with someone else )

    Ah, no…I mean yes! It’s complicated…

    Started out with an ’04 Enduro and bought an ’08 Rock Springs. The Rock Springs was meant to replace the Enduro but it didn’t work out for the reasons I gave above , so I gave it to my missus and bought a Wolf Ridge (in a larger size) which became the basis of my AM build. It took a while to get it right, but that’s a whole other story.

    I replaced my Enduro with the Camber last year, all has been great there.

    So in summary, I have a Wolf Ridge AND a Camber, both built very differently and they’re all the better for it.

    And my Enduro frame is in permanent retirement, hanging on my living room wall.

    Premier Icon Normal Man
    Subscriber

    Thanks – at least I am not going mad then!!

    I have a Camber too, which is why I remembered. (very pleased with it too!)

    Premier Icon stilltortoise
    Subscriber

    There’s nothing you’d ride on your enduro that someone hasn’t already ridden on an appropriately strong/durable short travel hardtail.

    There’s always one 🙄 😆

    Stevelol
    Member

    I did it, Covert and Evil Sovereign down to one bike (a Blur TRc) I did it because I really wanted one and it was the only way I could afford it, I also had a bit of cash left over from selling them and building the TRc up.

    The only time I regret it is when something breaks on the bike, I think it can be risky and it was a gamble getting the Blur because I went from 2 bikes I really enjoyed down to one, luckily for me it’s paid off and I’ve got the perfect bike for me now.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Subscriber

    Went from having a 6″ Helius as my ” big bike” and a hummer for general XC and an on one SS, to just a Chameleon

    It’s light enough, can SS’d, and it will take a longish fork and still ride ok, it’s pretty much perfect. It has to be said, despite the Internet truism that is “chameleons are back killers” there are, pretty much reasonably conventional Ali hard tails. Might get something made of another material or with different sized wheels, but essentially a LT HT is pretty much the definition of a do it all bike

    tinsy
    Member

    Surely either a 456ti or Enduro would be perfect for a “do it all” bike?

    This is what I thought… If it were my choice I think I would keep the Enduro but run 2 sets of wheels, big day wheels & something really light for every day stuff.

    To be honest whatever you decide bike wise, the 2 sets of wheels thing makes sense.

    persona
    Member

    having now read your Enduro woes thread. (not sure whether to post this reply here or in that TBH)

    Anyway, it’s pretty obvious you’re simply not a very experienced rider.

    simply ride more before you head off again on a holiday to ride trails above your skill level and you’ll enjoy it much more. There are plenty steep/tech/rocky trails to practice on over here.

    Why not start a thread to find them if you don’t know of any local to you.

    Premier Icon Cheezpleez
    Subscriber

    This. Is. Insanity.

    I’ve read your other thread on the Enduro, I’ll attempt to answer both here. First, be in no doubt the enduro is one of, if not the best “do it all bikes” ever. Bar none. Especially if your “do it all” involves proper technical terrain.

    The fact that it is long shouldn’t be a hindrance on slower more technical trails as it has short chainstays for quick cornering and excellent balance once you learn to throw them about. I’ve owned several variations and loads of similar bikes.

    However, having said all that, in proper aggro spec they can be a bit of a bit of a chore to pedal about all day on less demanding trails especially with heavier wheels and tires. A second, lighter set of wheels and tires for local trails and maybe a bit of shock suspension fettle could turn it into your one bike to do it all.

    You could, if money was not an object and you wanted a more light duty all rounder that would still be fit for the alps I would say look no further than the stumpy evo carbon.

    What 1 bike ??? …as in …less than 2 or 3 …..nah ..I don’t get it …that’s just wrong

    Premier Icon coolhandluke
    Subscriber

    Me from the Enduro woes thread, since they are now more related..

    Decision made

    Just put some air forks on, 150mm Revelations. Off the 456ti, and the lighter wheels off the 456 too.

    I’ll see how it runs with those on. It’s steeper by 25 mm or so but they are better spec fork.

    Thanks for everyone’s advice by the way. It’s been very useful.

    Don’t get me wrong, the Enduro is a boss bike, so very capable, more capable than me that’s for sure

    . The firs Alp trip on this Enduro, it took me a few days to get the thing up to speed but I’d only got it a week before the trip, second Alps trip was fine, this trip to Andorra, I really felt I struggled with the bike on the techy descents ( fine and fun on the fast flowy stuff where it just ripped.) to be fair too, the endless hangovers didn’t help either. Still, we were on holiday and the beer was cheap.

    I’m going to make it it my only bike for a while and see how it goes as I only really use it on holidays and I think that’s part of the problem as well as the fox 36 wallowyness

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