Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)
  • Frequently broken spoke.
  • Premier Icon zippykona
    Full Member

    Had the local bike shop put my good hub on my good rim. They used new spokes.

    Bit later the spoke broke. They replaced it. Broke again so I replaced it.

    Now it’s broken again.

    What would cause a spoke / eyelet to keep breaking?

    Premier Icon branes
    Full Member

    Spokes are too short and aluminium nipples?

    https://www.wheelfanatyk.com/blog/wheel-building-tip-no-9-succeed-with-alu-nipples/

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    What would cause a spoke / eyelet to keep breaking?

    That’s a nipple breakage, not a spoke.

    Longer spoke

    Brass nipple

    Check tension, especially compared with other spokes nearby.

    Premier Icon BlobOnAStick
    Full Member

    Is it anywhere near the joint in the rim? Is this flexing?

    Premier Icon Bez
    Full Member

    Bit hard to see from a photo where the tyre’s nicely in focus but the nipple’s blurred 🙂

    In the absence of a better photo, though, it does look like the spoke’s too short. (Assuming that the spoke head has broken away and there’s no exposed part of the spoke left sticking out.)

    Also, is it the same breakage each time? You say “spoke/eyelet” breaking, but spoke and eyelet both look fine, seems like the nipple’s failed.

    Premier Icon bigyan
    Free Member

    Looks like the head is broken off the nipple.

    Check the spoke length.

    Premier Icon alexnharvey
    Free Member

    If the suggestion is correct, replacing the spoke with a 1-2mm longer one should resolve your immediate problem.

    While you have the tyre and rim tape off you should also investigate the length of the other spokes. The concern would be that others may also be too short and not be sufficiently threaded into the nipples and therefore at risk of failing in the same way.

    Premier Icon damascus
    Free Member

    What @bigyan said.

    I suspect they used aluminum nipples that came with the spokes. Is the bike a commuter bike? If yes to both replace with brass nipples and maybe longer spokes if too short

    Premier Icon Bez
    Full Member

    Is the bike a commuter bike? If yes to both replace with brass nipples and maybe longer spokes if too short

    FTFY

    Premier Icon damascus
    Free Member

    @Bez, aluminium nipples are OK for normal use in my experience but when you commute on roads the salt destroys them. But I agree, I always use brass nipples. The weight saving isn’t worth it in my opinion.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Full Member

    Bike shop used the slightly shorter spokes they had on hand rather than order in a box of 100 of the correct size. Maybe to save time, or money, or both.

    Unless you have a very good reason, never use alloy nipples, and always use double-butted spokes.

    Check the rim bed of your wheel, the spokes coming from the rhs of the hub should all have similar protrusion or depth at the nipple, and ditto for the lhs. If they are not, odds on different lengths have been used, or you have wildly varying spoke tensions.

    The ideal is what bigyan posted.

    Premier Icon zippykona
    Full Member

    It’s a 29 wheel and the bike shop is purely road. Do road spokes tend to be shorter?

    Will check to see how long their spokes are and then get it rebuilt at a better shop.

    Premier Icon martinifartini
    Full Member

    Um

    Premier Icon 13thfloormonk
    Full Member

    It’s a 29 wheel and the bike shop is purely road. Do road spokes tend to be shorter?

    Will check to see how long their spokes are and then get it rebuilt at a better shop

    Wouldn’t think road spokes would be any shorter, other than to account for (possibly) more radial spoke builds or builds with fewer crosses.

    Before dismissing the shop entirely, consider it could have been an innocent mistake, one rogue shorter spoke made it into the bundle? Not great form for a wheel builder, but also not a hanging offence!

    Have just built new wheels with Sapim aluminium nipples*. apparently harder and better coated to prevent corrosion and seizing. I always build with copper grease spoke threads anyway so fingers crossed!

    *part experiment, part weight savings, part fancy anodised colours!

    Premier Icon spooky_b329
    Full Member

    Spoke length is determined by the hub, rim and lacing pattern. There will be a wide range of spoke lengths for 29 inch wheels.

    Premier Icon convert
    Full Member

    If it has been the same spoke each time it does sound like you have one short spoke. Very often (nearly always with disc wheels) the spokes are different length left and right – they could have swapped a pair maybe.

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