Frame snapped at chainstay

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  • Frame snapped at chainstay
  • Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    Spray.Bike takes a little practice; sounds like you’ve already figured out a few of the issues. The first time I tried it I was deliberately slapdash and it did chip really easily; on recent frames I’ve been more diligent with prep and used more lacquer, and so far it’s fared better. Haven’t tried T-Cut to buff up the finish, might give that a go.

    I won’t mention that I’ve had two chainstay repairs done for under £20 each at the local smithy 😉

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Can’t believe this is just at £275 with two hours to go , anyone after a bargain(possibly)
    Item no eBay 372860745929

    Son of a b*tch.

    I might have to bid on that.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Went for £387 in the end. If I hadn’t already had mine fixed it would have been a decent bargain, but not if it would have left me with another frame to shift.

    fudge9202
    Member

    Still mega cheap at £387 for a complete bike

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    No I know. If mine hadn’t been repairable I’d have bought it for a fair bit more than that.

    I think I’ll call Argos tomorrow. I stressed I didn’t want to lose tyre clearance and I have. I feel they could have talked me through the results better.

    fudge9202
    Member

    @molegtips that El Mariachi on eBay has been relisted due to a timewaster

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Shut the front door…

    fudge9202
    Member

    Looks a very well looked after frame

    Premier Icon weeksy
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    Shut the front door…

    My mate who’s coming down to BPW on the 3rd lives close to that too 😉

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Bollocks.

    Anyone want to buy a frame with slightly less tyre clearance than usual?

    I don’t think I can make it work tbh. I could flog the fork and wheels off that bike, but the drivetrain isn’t worth much. The dropper I’d keep but no-one’s going to want the one of my current bike. I’d be well out of pocket here and end up with a frame that’d be even harder to shift.

    Premier Icon ratherbeintobago
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    Did you get a chance to speak to Argos again?

    Premier Icon mick_r
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    If only someone on the forum had offered to help out for minimal cost…. 🙂

    Just kidding. Tricky situation for a professional repair business. They will be nervous of large amounts of crimping due to the known crack risk. Somebody earlier said “just fit a yoke”, but that is at least an extra £200 for a Paragon one. A plate yoke design would have worked, but you can’t buy them off the shelf so that adds the cost for CAD time, sending out for laser cutting, bending and more prep before it will fit etc etc so all cost and risk for something very bespoke as a retrofit to an existing frame.

    If you do go for a crimp then DON’T just squash it in the vice – that will just give you a flat / pointy oval tube that will crack along the top or bottom edges. You need a former to push the middle of the tube in on itself without growing the tube vertically. See photo below.

    nickjb
    Member

    that El Mariachi on eBay has been relisted due to a timewaster

    Was it a time waster or was the seller not happy with the price? Seems to happen a lot. I’ve been watching a few bikes on eBay recently and they bid to a much lower price than the seller wants (compared to the buy it now) then get relisted. Ones been “sold” 4 times now.

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Right, Argos said that they can crimp after it’s been built. I said at the time ‘I don’t want to lose much tyre clearance’, so they’ve written on their form ‘check clearance for 2.4s’. Of course, the 2.4 does fit, but only if you leave the dropouts on their longest setting and there’s only a few mm clearance. If I put them in the shortest setting the tyre doesn’t even turn. So that counts as ‘losing too much clearance’ in my book. I would have gone for a slightly less severe crimp, but there’s no crimp at all.

    They’re calling me back soon.

    If you do go for a crimp then DON’T just squash it in the vice – that will just give you a flat / pointy oval tube that will crack along the top or bottom edges. You need a former to push the middle of the tube in on itself without growing the tube vertically. See photo below.

    I had been wondering about doing it myself. My idea was to make a form then line it with some sort of hard setting putty to form to the outside chainstay shape exactly to minimise pressure. Then make a form for the inside based on the original crimp out of a piece of steel rod hammered to the correct curve. But that’s last resort if Argos won’t help.

    If only someone on the forum had offered to help out for minimal cost….

    I know mate.. it was always a difficult choice!

    Premier Icon ratherbeintobago
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    I’ve been watching a few bikes on eBay recently and they bid to a much lower price than the seller wants

    Surely that’s just one of the pitfalls of selling on the ‘Bay?

    nickjb
    Member

    Surely that’s just one of the pitfalls of selling on the ‘Bay?

    Actually I think it is more of a pitfall of having an unrealistic selling price in your head. They are going for what I have seen others go for and what I would say it was worth, it just doesn’t seem to be enough for the seller so they try again (usually with the same result)

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Yep.

    Argos used heat somehow to make the chainstays narrower by ovalising. It’s not clear how hot they got it, which has implications… I’m still not particularly happy because whilst there is now more clearance there still isn’t much and nowhere near what there was. There’s also clearance for my 32T oval ring, but only barely, and again far less than there was. This means chainsuck could cause a jammed chain and hence ruin the stay again. I’ve given up with them, so I’m wondering what I can do myself.

    After researching it a bit and getting great help from the framebuilder subforum of bikeforums.net I’ve learned that what makes 853 is a secret heat treatment process – it’s otherwise the same as one of the other steels. Reynolds tell you not to shape the tubes yourself but they don’t say why. And after long discussion we don’t know how much heat was used and what effect this will have on the tube. It could end up harder (and therefore more prone to cracking during any crimp) or more ductile, meaning I could crimp away.

    I’m tempted to crimp just a little (using a home-made jig, not just attacking it with pliers), give myself a couple more mm – this would probably satisfy me on the inside at least. But I don’t think I can do much about the outside for chainring clearance.

    I’m quite disappointed. 853 was clearly a terrible choice for a customer who was particular about clearance and needed shaped stays because there’s very little you can do to work it. None of this was discussed at all when I went in. I wish I’d just had it welded up now, would have saved a lot of time, money and hassle.

    Premier Icon mick_r
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    Sounds like you really want the clearance so try crimping. Go steady and it shouldn’t be a disaster….

    If you cock up or it cracks later then I’ll convert it to a plate yoke. I can get the plate laser cut foc, and can reuse / leave the majority of the stays in situ (just chop out the front bit). After this tale of disaster you can just cover postage.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Thanks mate, I really appreciate it but I would not let you do that without compensation 🙂

    I think I will add a roll of FiberFix to my trail kit from now on 🙂

    donks
    Member

    Sheared the chainstay on my Stooge last week…..also very gutted as it’s my only bike and was out of warrantee but called Andy at Stooge and have come to a deal on a new MK4 which is lovely. Was going to get it repaired but couldn’t resist a shiny new one. Still bloody waiting for 15mm wheel axle conversions off the internet though.

    mrmoofo
    Member

    It’s failed twice – would you every trust it again?

    Premier Icon mick_r
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    The new chainstays are different material / crimping and as far as I’m aware don’t have any memory of what happened to the old ones…. Why should the rider trust them less than the chainstays on any other steel bike?

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    It’s failed twice – would you every trust it again?

    The chainstays failed – but they were replaced, and the new chainstays are of a completely different construction. Why would they fail? Also the cause of the failure was chainsuck and a wrongly fitted chainset. The chainset is now correctly fitted.

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