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  • Fox DPX2 shock – tune negative spring
  • Premier Icon pembo6
    Full Member

    I’ve just bought a used Fox DPX2 shock with EVol can (performance series, without the LSC adjustment).

    My bike (Banshee Spitfire) works best without the extra negative volume of the eVol canister.

    Is it possible to “tune” the negative spring with spacers, Ti effectively make it a non-eVol can? It’s one of the new 2018 cans without the removable outer shell. So no way to easily access the negative side.

    Cheers for any advice.

    Premier Icon Scienceofficer
    Free Member

    I have a DPX2 on my prime and I’m very happy with it.

    I’ve never heard of this before. Where did you get your information?

    Honestly, it doesn’t sound right.

    Premier Icon pembo6
    Full Member

    Straight from Keith Scott ( as in Keith KS link) from Banshee. And plenty of other places on the net. The KS link has quite a high initial leverage ratio and is then progressive. A high negative can shock (eg evol or debonair) does not suit. The bike is better with a standard can (non evol/debonair).

    “The non-debonair shock is what we prefer. The debonair system was developed for bikes like Santacruz where the linkage was regressive to progressive, and so initial stroke is not supple, and midstroke has very little support. Ours is the opposite shape with overall progression, so with debonair the initial stroke is too soft on our bikes and then feels like a kind of harsh platform in middle of travel.”

    It’s great that your Prime works well with the DPX2.

    Premier Icon Scienceofficer
    Free Member

    That’s interesting.

    I wonder why they’re all specced with debonair monarchs in that case?

    Where they comments from a while back and the design has changed I wonder.

    So he’s saying that the initial leverage rate offsets the initial resistance to movement in a conventional shock , and the high neg vol shocks move too easily because if this.

    I understood that the primes leverage curve falls away to start, before becoming increasingly progressive from roughly the sag point. Certainly what I remember from looking at its graph a year or so back.

    Premier Icon pembo6
    Full Member

    Got point science officer. I have seen a lot with monarch plus shocks.
    Although I can’t see any specced with debonair shocks where I got mine from (Banshee NZ). The custom builder has plenty of options but none mention “debonair” or “Evol”. Also, I believe it’s easy to fill the negative (and positive) chamber of a debonair shock with volume spacers. Effectively making it a non deb shock.

    Keith suggested adding 9 bands to the positive side of my previous Monarch deb (they take a max of 10 I think). That was based on Banshee’s testing of the Rune. And fill the negative side (I th ink max 3 from memory)??

    These were quite recent comments from Bansee.

    So he’s saying that the initial leverage rate offsets the initial resistance to movement in a conventional shock , and the high neg vol shocks move too easily because if this.

    Correct.

    The Spitfire and Rune have a similar leverage curve. Start quite high (i.e. a small amount of shock movement for a lot of suspension movement) and get more progressive before getting slightly regressive towards the end of the stroke. Sounds like the Prime is a bit different. ??

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