Forward. (first world grammar problem).

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  • Forward. (first world grammar problem).
  • aP
    Member

    Well he is a bit isn’t he? Being a politician ‘n all.

    They’re possibly pissed that it isn’t “forwards”?

    bigyinn
    Member

    Maybe it should be FOREWARNED?

    Premier Icon cheese@4p
    Subscriber

    The full stop is a bit OTT?

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Not sure how you can complain about grammar when it’s one single word.

    They’re possibly pissed that it isn’t “forwards”?

    Ah, that’d be why. They should be pissed off that it isn’t ‘forwards’.

    don simon
    Member

    The full stop is a bit OTT?

    This is what some are saying, but I can’t see why. 🙁

    brakes
    Member

    they don’t get it because they’re all a bit backward

    They should be pissed off that it isn’t ‘forwards’.

    Like duh.

    The full stop is a bit OTT?

    Is that a question! (sic)

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    The full stop is a bit OTT?

    Ah.

    It’s a period drama.

    munrobiker
    Member

    Full stops are only used at the end of a complete grammatical sentence. Which the word “forward” on its own is not, therefore it has no full stop.

    Full stops are only used at the end of a complete grammatical sentence. Which the word “forward” on its own is not, therefore it has no full stop.

    A complete,* grammatical sentence should not start with “which”. Unless, of course, it is a question.

    * You missed the commas in both your first and second sentences. C-

    don simon
    Member

    Full stops are only used at the end of a complete grammatical sentence.

    What is a sentence? What isn’t?

    Superfluous use of a comma by O’Flashearty. E

    Junkyard
    Member

    makes no comment whilst recalling something about glass houses 😳

    don simon
    Member

    Apparently this is kicking up a bit of a storm with the grammar police in the US of A.
    Looks fine to me.
    Anyone care to shed any light?

    Well I liked your post Cougar – made me smile 🙂

    Forward is an adjective, forwards is a verb. I think it should be forwards

    don simon
    Member

    Forward is an adjective, forwards is a verb. I think it should be forwards

    Surely forwards is an adverb, isn’t it?

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    Full stops should only used at the end of complete grammatical sentences, that the word “forward” on its own is not, therefore it should have no full stop.

    Possibly only one sentence is required, rather than two.

    don simon
    Member

    I’ll reiterate my question about what cocnstitutes a sentence.
    What is your definition of a sentence?

    Premier Icon martinhutch
    Subscriber

    I’d probably let him off the full stop on the basis that it is a kind of imperative, and can stand alone, a bit like ‘forward!’, but sans quote marks (PR styling) and with the exclamation mark softened for electoral purposes.

    Probably still get red pen from my old English teacher, depending on mood.

    EDIT: Plus it needs to miss off the final ‘d’ to appeal to right-wing voters.

    theflatboy
    Member

    Conceptually, it’s very close to the shortest possible English sentence. A special prize awaits anyone who knows it. (Please don’t look it up and ruin it for others.)

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber
    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    (or possibly, ‘I am.’?)

    theflatboy
    Member

    Neither right. Quite close, though.

    CountZero
    Member

    The full stop is a bit OTT?
    Ah.

    It’s a period drama.

    Boom, tish!
    Well done, that man! Made me smile a lot. 😀

    bikebouy
    Member

    [quoteI’ll reiterate my question about what cocnstitutes a sentence.
    What is your definition of a sentence[/quote]

    Id say 4 years in Broadmoor for nicking something.

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    Broadoor is a secure mental hospital isn’t it? Four years for ‘nicking’? I didnt completely stab him your honour, he moved so I only nicked him. You’re one harsh judge!

    don simon – Member

    I’ll reiterate my question about what cocnstitutes a sentence.
    What is your definition of a sentence?

    DS, you are going to become the GW of the chat forum at this rate.

    FWIW, I like to include at least one verb in my sentences for starters. We aren’t using ‘forward’ as another one of those ‘nouns-turned-into-verbs’ now are we? 😀

    [edit] -I worry that they are really objecting to the man behind the lectern rather than his full stop. 😕

    hels
    Member

    Don Simon: a sentence needs a subject, an object and a verb.

    A single word is not all 3. I think it’s also maybe a convention in typography that full capitals don’t need punctuation, but that’s not really my field.

    Julian Wilson: that would be “forwarding”. Which I hate almost as much as “networking”.

    Premier Icon stever
    Subscriber

    I like it. It’s powerful. It’s a bit of visual rhetoric, and it’s worked if people are arguing the toss over it. We’re not used to seeing stops on straplines, so it gives you a slight cognitive pause. The stop says, ‘that’s all, that’s what we’re for’. Note the lack of stops on your favourite gloomy subtitled detective stories.

    peterfile
    Member

    Just out of curiosity…could someone give me an example of a third world grammar problem?

    I has really poor internet speed?

    I like it. It’s powerful. It’s a bit of visual rhetoric, and it’s worked if people are arguing the toss over it. We’re not used to seeing stops on straplines, so it gives you a slight cognitive pause. The stop says, ‘that’s all, that’s what we’re for’. Note the lack of stops on your favourite gloomy subtitled detective stories.

    Do you work in advertising, or do you just really like full stops? 🙂

    bikebouy
    Member

    Is it?
    Oooops.

    Who changed my spelling of “something’ to something?

    don simon
    Member

    😳 😳 😳

    DS, you are going to become the GW of the chat forum at this rate.

    Perhaps I should have used emoticons. 😉 😀 😈
    Forward not a verb? 😉 😆
    What do you do with an email that you receive then want to f__________ to someone else? 😆 8)

    Premier Icon stever
    Subscriber

    Advertising? No, but I know the difference between a hyphen, en dash, and em dash. Trying telling that to the youth of today 😉

    could someone give me an example of a third world grammar problem?

    In Somalia, pirates are currently in-fighting about the use of “their” in sentences such as “A private yacht owner takes responsibility for their own actions when sailing towards the Gulf of Aden around the Horn of Africa.” Apparently a few of them would rather stick with the increasingly rare “his or her” – the discussions get pretty heated about it – which is dangerous when you’re all chewing Khat and have an AK-47.

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    could someone give me an example of a third world grammar problem?

    You’re pidgin iz saracen

    hels
    Member

    Forward is an adverb. So not quite as bad as attaching “ing” to a noun and inventing a new verb as in “networking” and all it’s evil minions, but still a harbringer of the downfall of western civilization and enlightenment, brought on by Microsoft. The geeks shall inherit the earth, and all that.

    I’m not that bothered by the extra full stop, it’s kinda cheeky, and doesn’t ruin the meaning of the sentence.

    don simon
    Member

    Don Simon: a sentence needs a subject, an object and a verb.

    Which I would agree with and would satisfy the need of a full stop, Yet the verb being used as imperative would also require a full stop, wouldn’t it?

    peterfile
    Member

    In Somalia, pirates are currently in-fighting about the use of “their” in sentences such as “A private yacht owner takes responsibility for their own actions when sailing towards the Gulf of Aden around the Horn of Africa.” Apparently a few of them would rather stick with the increasingly rare “his or her” – the discussions get pretty heated about it – which is dangerous when you’re all chewing Khat and have an AK-47.

    That’s insane. I had no idea how bad things had become.

    I suppose we are shielded from a lot of this by the BBC’s reporting. I’m going to send a link to this thread to all the hippie feminists at Glasgow School of Art so they can start some sort of movement (and on that note, 2 cups of coffee down that hatch, it’s about that time when I start my own movement).

    DS, yep, emoticons included that is still pretty much what GW does on the other channel -walks the line between humour and trolling but generally falls in the ‘likeable’ side even though he is always always right. FWIW it’s more of an observation than either a compliment or criticism.

    As above, “forward” was not a verb pre-emails. (mind you, neither was “email!”) -I believe the original way of saying this invariably included the rather older verb “send”, eg “send on”, “send forward”.

    Yet the verb being used as imperative would also require a full stop, wouldn’t it?

    I am also guessing that Obama is not using the word in that sense (imperative use of “forward” applied to paper or electronic mail) either, unless he is really just trying to stimlaute use of the internet by exorting us to send more of those “forward this email if you love pictures of americans in walmart” emails to everyone in our address books.

    My least favourite new verb is “helicopter” -not in the military/mountain rescue sense, but the managment-speak dissemination of information sense.

    “podium” and “medal” also seem to be rather popular ‘new’ verbs this month too.

    My least favourite new verb is “helicopter” -not in the military/mountain rescue sense, but the managment-speak dissemination of information sense.

    I think “helicopter” more than makes up for this minor transgression through its use in the waving your willy round in circles sense.

    Should be “Forwards!”

    bikebouy
    Member

    Spelling police.

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