• This topic has 37 replies, 26 voices, and was last updated 11 years ago by mc.
Viewing 38 posts - 1 through 38 (of 38 total)
  • Food Poisoning from chicken soup
  • Premier Icon ballsofcottonwool
    Free Member

    I made a big pot of chicken soup last night from a fresh carcass and plenty of veg, it was too hot to put in the fridge when I went to bed, so I left it in a covered saucepan overnight and put in the fridge this morning. My wife is paranoid that it is going to give us food poisoning if we eat it for supper tonight.

    Would you eat my soup?

    Premier Icon hels
    Free Member

    Not definitely, but quite possibly.

    I shared a flat for a while with an Environmental Health Inspector.

    Poultry (esp cooked) very bad for campilobacta (sp?), as is leaving food out to cool, contrary to popular belief. He would put piping hot stuff straight in the fridge.

    If you do decide to eat it microwave the frack out of it first, in fact just bomb the frack out of it from orbit, that should do it.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Full Member

    my wife wouldn’t eat and I probably wouldn;t give it to my kids.

    I might have taken a chance on it but I’m not sure.

    trouble is now the thoughts in her head she won’t be able to enjoy the stuff for worrying anyway 🙁

    Premier Icon BFITH
    Free Member

    Eat it and see what happens!

    HTH

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Full Member

    I make chicken stock all the time from carcasses and leftovers. I quite often cook it one day, leave it either out on the side or in the fridge then scrape off any fat and reheat it. Usually at this stage I strain and reduce it and put it in the freezer once it’s cool (or gone all jelly-like) for later use.

    Just make sure you boil it up before using. I always do this in a pan.

    So the answer is – yes, definitely eat it. It’ll be better for having rested.

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Free Member

    Mleh. I leave casseroles on the hob top for days.

    Chicken ones possibly only for a day or two.

    What doesnt kill you….doesnt kill you 🙂

    Premier Icon mastiles_fanylion
    Free Member

    Is your wife my wife?

    Premier Icon ebygomm
    Free Member

    I would eat it, no worries.

    We regularly leave left overs on top of the stove overnight.

    (except rice, I’m paranoid about rice )

    Premier Icon geoffj
    Full Member

    Depends

    If you left in the pan you cooked it in with the (well fitting) lid in place then transferred it to the fridge when cool, it should be fine, as the pan and lid will have been sterilised by the cooking.

    If, however, you transferred it to anoth container, or started stirring it again, or did something else, which had the potential to introduce bugs to it, then no.

    Either way, nuking it in the microwave should work as long as you nuke it proper.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Full Member

    Just make sure you reheat it to it’s very hot all the way through and I only reheat it the once so maybe do it per portion.

    Premier Icon allthepies
    Free Member

    I would eat it (after bringing it to simmer point for 5 mins or so).

    Premier Icon globalti
    Free Member

    Absolutely OK to eat, as someone else says you will have sterilised the soup and the pan so as long as you kept it closed overnight it will be fine. It’s always best to cool and heat food fast so that it spends as little time as possible at the temperature range where bacteria can reproduce.

    Waaaay back in student days some Irish pals of mine made themselves a nice beef stew, which they re-heated for dinner one night, then again the next night, then again…. and wondered why they spend all night running to the bog.

    Premier Icon jon1973
    Free Member

    Mleh. I leave casseroles on the hob top for days.

    Chicken ones possibly only for a day or two.

    What doesnt kill you….doesnt kill you

    Exactly, violent stomach cramps, sickness and diarrhea is just weakness leaving the body. MTFU.

    Premier Icon DaRC_L
    Full Member

    Regularly do similar – just make sure you bring to the boil and simmer for a while to kill all the bugs.
    If the human race was that delicate we’d have died out long ago.

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Full Member

    I’m always reluctant to put hot things in the fridge or freezer because they’ll warm up everything else in there.

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Free Member

    and create condensation

    Premier Icon z1ppy
    Free Member

    my g/f would have it in the bin, personnally I’d just heat it to 70 degrees for 2 minute and serve it up.

    Premier Icon K
    Full Member

    Hide it in the shed and eat it when she isn’t about. You know it will be all right.

    Premier Icon clubber
    Free Member

    I’d eat it. My wife wouldn’t and I probably wouldn’t give it to my son.

    Premier Icon DaRC_L
    Full Member

    Big_John correct = you then get food poisoning from warming everything else up in the frige

    Premier Icon bigyinn
    Free Member

    ebygomm – Member

    (except rice, I’m paranoid about rice )
    Why? Does it form macro armies whilst you’re asleep and enter your body by any orifices available and have noisy parties in your colon once you’re awake?
    I know mine does……

    Premier Icon sharkbait
    Free Member

    Would you eat my soup?

    Yes please 🙂

    ……….got any crusty bread as well?

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Full Member

    Reheating rice can generate very nasty toxins.

    Premier Icon DaRC_L
    Full Member

    What about the chinese?
    Refried rice anyone….

    Premier Icon poppa
    Free Member

    Yes of course. I wouldn’t eat it without bringing it to a simmer for 5 minutes or so however. Not many bugs can survive at 100 degrees celcius.

    I regularly leave cooked food out overnight, covered, if I intend to reheat it thoroughly and eat it. If I am planning on eating something cold, however, I always chill it.

    Premier Icon cynic-al
    Full Member

    Premier Icon poppa
    Free Member

    P.S It’s not reheating rice that causes toxins to grow, its storing cooked rice improperly.

    Premier Icon hels
    Free Member

    Que ?? On the rice. I cleaned house for a Chinese family when I was it Uni, their fridge was always full of cold rice they would cook it the night before and reheat the next day, never ate it fresh.

    I’ll get my mum to drive past their house and make sure they are still alive.

    Actually technically they were Taiwanese not Chinese – apols.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Full Member

    Sounds like they were storing it properly the hels. Botulism from rice is one if the biggest causes of food poisoning.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Full Member

    hels – rice is one of the biggest causes of food posioning.

    Food standard agency;

    It’s true that you could get food poisoning from eating reheated rice. But it’s not actually the reheating that’s the problem – it’s the way the rice has been stored before reheating.

    Uncooked rice can contain spores of Bacillus cereus, bacteria that can cause food poisoning. When the rice is cooked, the spores can survive. Then, if the rice is left standing at room temperature, the spores will germinate into bacteria. These bacteria will multiply and may produce toxins (poisons) that cause vomiting or diarrhoea. Reheating the rice won’t get rid of these toxins.

    So, the longer cooked rice is left at room temperature, the more likely it is that bacteria, or the toxins they produce, could stop the rice being safe to eat.

    It’s best to serve rice when it has just been cooked. If that isn’t possible, cool the rice as quickly as possible (ideally within one hour) and keep it in the fridge for no more than one day until reheating.

    Remember that when you reheat any food, you should always check that it’s steaming hot all the way through, and avoid reheating more than once.

    Premier Icon poppa
    Free Member

    But chuck it in the fridge and reheat it thoroughly before eating and you’ll be fine.

    Premier Icon McHamish
    Free Member

    My old dog used to refuse old food – I assumed it was because he knew it wasn’t safe to eat

    Although he used to eat rotten rabbit carcases found in bushes and cow pats.

    I’m not sure he was much of a connoisseur.

    Premier Icon piedidiformaggio
    Free Member

    It’ll be fine. It’s Salmon Moouse you’ve got to watch out for

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Free Member

    another scary food fact for you!

    Red kidney beans are toxic when raw, non toxic when cooked properly, but more toxic than raw beans when partially cooked!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytohaemagglutinin

    Measured in haemagglutinating units (hau), a raw red kidney bean can contain up to 70,000 hau. This can be reduced to safe levels by correct cooking (boiling for at least ten minutes at 100 °C). However, cooking at 80 °C, such as in a slow cooker, can raise the available hau up to fivefold.

    Premier Icon hora
    Free Member

    Depends how warm your kitchen is over night- if very cold it’ll mimic a fridge anyway.

    If in doubt though- bin it.

    Premier Icon mrsconsequence
    Free Member

    Ha I didn’t realise it was a generally womanly thing to worry about food poisoning from leaving food out overnight – see this philconsequence, it’s not just my irrational phobia of vomiting! It’s a woman thing, and that forever should be my excuse 🙂

    I wouldn’t eat it eep! But does sound lovely…

    Premier Icon ballsofcottonwool
    Free Member

    Ha! We ate soup, I’m still alive and wifey and the kids didn’t have to make any high speed visits to the loo.

    Premier Icon mc
    Free Member

    I’ve survived being brought up on reheated soup.

    Soup stock gets made from whatever carcass was left over, or stock cubes if there wasn’t any, then the soup lasts for several days, being reheated as required. Main thing is you give it a good boil before eating, to kill of any bugs.

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