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  • Flip chips and suspension settings
  • Premier Icon sanername
    Full Member

    Looking at the Pivot on the front page, I’ve always been intrigued by bikes that have adjustable geometry. Is it a case of just flipping the chip, or do you need to adjust suspension settings when you do so? Do people who have them just tend that they like one set up more than the other, or do people actually change them depending on where they are riding? Is it a faff?
    Not necessarily thinking N-1, but I do have two MTBs a rigid Bfe for pissing about in the woods and a 2017 smuggler for pissing about in the hills.

    Premier Icon thepurist
    Full Member

    I was going to post something similar – I currently have the option of Low or X-Low on my bike. I rode it the way it came for a while then tried it for a few months the other way, then put it back the way it was to start with and doubt I’ll bother changing it again. For me it was a relatively small difference, not a reason for N-1.

    Premier Icon chiefgrooveguru
    Free Member

    Most bikes you put in the lowest setting and leave it there for good. Occasionally you get a bike where the lowest setting is too low for pedally riding and then it becomes a useful option for uplift days or when you’re riding really steep trails.

    Now that mullet bikes are a thing, the low setting is becoming the full 29 one whilst the high setting stops the 29/27.5 from being too low and slack.

    I used to changing the settings fairly often on my Spitfire but I think that was because I was used to my hardtail being a lot higher and steeper. Once I got a lower slacker hardtail and got used to it, then my full-sus tended to stay in the lowest setting.

    Premier Icon Olly
    Free Member

    friend of mine has a Rocky mountain that has a 9 position chip (Ride 9, i think they call it)

    it gives you flexibility not only to slacken or steepen the bike, just by squatting the rear end up or down, but it also allows you to move the shock vertically, which affects the leverage ratios a bit.
    He seems to like it, and ive been impressed how upright his bike looks when its in “XC mode”, compared to how slack it sits on Downhill Days.

    Premier Icon sanername
    Full Member

    Hummmm, that’s interesting about the mullet bike thing. My BFe is sort of a mullet with a 29×3 on the front and a 27.5×2.8 on the back and I love it like that.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    My Spesh Enduro has a wee lump of thick-ish metal that I originally mistook for some afterthought washer to make the shock fit properly. I didn’t realise what it actually was until I removed the shock to change springs and on re-assembly the whole thing look “odd”. It then clicked. It’s remarkably “hand-made” and has a “made in a shed by the apprentice” look about it for an item that they market so heavily…I’ve fiddled with it once, and left it alone.

    Premier Icon snotrag
    Full Member

    Most bikes you put in the lowest setting and leave it there for good. Occasionally you get a bike where the lowest setting is too low for pedally riding and then it becomes a useful option for uplift days or when you’re riding really steep trails.

    I’ve got a current shape Hightower. If you read the American forums you’ll see they all ride it in low. I found it nearly unrideable, even with 165mm cranks, for actual ‘mountain biking’.

    The shock also required some adjustment to get it feeling right (changes to leverage curve).

    Interstingly I still run a 150mm fork (as per SC reccomendation and builds). It seems many of those running ‘low’ are also running 160 or 170mm fork. Suggestions they should have just bought a Megatower seem to fall on deaf ears!

    I currently have the option of Low or X-Low on my bike

    Exactly this – the settings on mine should be labelled Low or Lower. Theres nothing ‘High’ about it at all!

    Premier Icon 5lab
    Free Member

    I found it nearly unrideable, even with 165mm cranks, for actual ‘mountain biking’.

    the mountains are different over there – and I’m not being funny – I’ve ridden in a bunch of places that side of the atlantic and there’s far fewer root gardens are far more rock rolls than anywhere around here

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    By virtue of lowering your BB you may want to have more sag on the fork, or less on the shock, doubt anyone actually does it, a bit like shifting between the settings, a bit too much hassle for biking.

    I’m not a huge fan of low BBs anyway, i suffer enough strikes as it is without adding to it!

    Premier Icon campfreddie
    Free Member

    I have Canyon Strive CF and I use the Shapeshifter all the time as it is just so easy (press a button and you’re done). I ride with friends who have flipchips of various types and none of them touch them (out here in Madeira you are generally set to go as low and laid back as possible as the uphills sections are pretty short).

    Premier Icon dickyhepburn
    Free Member

    I have this on my Radon Swoop, use mid position “trail” and low-slack “bike park” for trail centre use. Defo notice the difference 👍 bit of a fiddle to change, wouldn’t want to do it on the fly, more of a befor you ride thing.

    Premier Icon chiefgrooveguru
    Free Member

    “ By virtue of lowering your BB you may want to have more sag on the fork, or less on the shock, doubt anyone actually does it, a bit like shifting between the settings, a bit too much hassle for biking.”

    For a long time I rode my Spitfire in the neutral setting on my local trails and I really noticed the difference swapping to low/slack when I went somewhere steep – gave me the confidence to drop into a reasonably gnarly (for me) black run.

    Then I found it was better in the wet and mud in the lowest setting too. But it was always quicker in the dry on flatter trails in the neutral setting, I could pedal sooner out of corners and it was quicker changing direction on slalomy bits. Then I got bored/scared of chasing Strava times locally, too much risk of hitting a tree and left it in low/slack.

    Premier Icon clubby
    Full Member

    Had them in the past, both bolt in and tool free.
    Bolt in one was quite noticeable back to back to but very rarely had it set up in the less rowdy setting.
    Tool free one was an ancient Fox Talas rear shock and forks. Quick to change with a twist of dial at each end but again, after a while I just left it in the longer travel settings all the time.

    From looking at the changes most give, I don’t think there is enough difference on offer for the extra hassle. We are usually talking half degrees.

    Premier Icon chiefgrooveguru
    Free Member

    “From looking at the changes most give, I don’t think there is enough difference on offer for the extra hassle. We are usually talking half degrees.”

    They tend to make more of a difference than the half degree angle change alone would though – because not only is the bike slackened off by that much, the bottom bracket also drops by 6-8mm and thus the stack increases, making your bars feel higher.

    On my older Spitfire there were three positions so you could have a full degre of angle and half an inch of BB height variation. That was enough that I’d feel like I needed to adjust my bar roll because of the change in reach and stack and seat angle affecting riding position.

    I’d say that that one degree but also BB and reach/stack change had more of an effect on the bike’s handling than when I put in a -2 deg headset.

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