Flat shoes for the winter

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  • This topic has 20 replies, 16 voices, and was last updated 3 years ago by  nach.
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  • Flat shoes for the winter
  • Mowgli
    Member

    My gf currently uses some knackered old running shoes which are completely inadequate. Was thinking of getting her something like the Fiveten Freerider and a pair of sealskins socks for the winter. Is there any other better combination for winter riding? It’s surprising how many winter-specific SPD shoes there are compared to basically none for flat shoes. The Shimano AM41 is probably ok but the looks don’t cut it unfortunately.

    Cheers!

    Premier Icon Tiboy
    Subscriber

    mrs tiboy had freeriders and loved them for riding flats, but they are a bit of a spnge in winter, so take ages to dry, but she was always comfortable in sealskins 🙂

    saxabar
    Member

    Not a fan of the golf shoe look myself, but I’ve just ordered the Shimanos. Reviews not great on the soles (they wear out quick apparently), but so have my Freeriders. Probably worth thinking ahead of autumn/winter next year and getting a decent pair of shoes resoled with 5.10 rubber (there’s a guy in Llanberis who does it).

    Premier Icon Simon
    Subscriber

    I just wear Freeriders all year with thick socks when it’s cold or sealskinz when it’s wet. Mine are the Danny Macaskill version with leather uppers, I imagine the Element version would be better for winter.
    My Freeriders dry out much quicker than my old Impacts.

    Premier Icon FOG
    Subscriber

    It’s not so much the waterproofing, my Sombrios + sealskins aren’t too bad but it’ s the sliding about in the hike-a-bike sections that drives me mad. I suppose a flat sole that sticks to your pedals is inevitably incompatible with a sole that grips on slippy mud on slippy limestone. Anybody find anything that does both?

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Subscriber

    Freerider elements VXI or whatever they call them, a half size up with nice merino socks and sealskins. Brilliant. Miles better than the big shimano mt91 I used to use.

    Edit – and they dry out super-quick too!.

    Premier Icon riklegge
    Subscriber

    Most of the climbing shoe brands make approach shoes, these are basically tough trainers with (usually) sticky rubber soles. Previously I’ve used both Fiveten camp fours and Evolv Capitans and while they aren’t as good on the bike as dedicated bike shoes are still pretty grippy on the pedals, offer reasonable water resistance, and grip in the mud.

    bikeneil
    Member

    My wife hated the looks of the AM41 until I bought her some. They look so much better in the flesh. The images online really don’t do them justice.

    Premier Icon ton
    Subscriber

    5/10 sam hill freeride things. the new ones. dry in no time at all and wipe clean like new.
    with smartwool sock for cold and knee length seal skins for wet.

    Premier Icon ratadog
    Subscriber

    One option to explore is inov8 roclite goretex boots and warm socks. Works OK with flats and has the hike a bike sections sorted.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    The Freerider Elements is good- not perfect, but much better and warmer in the wet than a standard Freerider, and they seem to dry faster too. That’s not the VXI version, just hte standard Freerider Elements.

    I’ve not tried the VXI Freerider but the VXI Impact is pretty bad IMO, it’s better made and more waterproof than the old Impact, and just as grippy, but there’s basically no feel at all, it’s like wearing clogs. YMMV of course and in every other way they’re better than the old Impact.

    My favourite is actually a Sombrio, the X-Shazam- it’s a high top with a lace flap, a pretty waterproof outer, and relatively warm. I see CRC has them back in stock, might have to buy another set. Not as grippy as a Five Ten but they don’t need to be.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Subscriber

    Flippin’ brilliant.

    Trail-Blazer
    Member

    I don’t get why the manufacturers of these shoes can’t use a waterproof membrane on some of their offerings. Nothing worse than getting soggy feet whilst out riding IMO. They do know that it’s not wall to wall sunshine in these parts, don’t they?

    Adding a gore-tex liner (or equivalent) would cost pennies and make their shoes much more usable all year round.

    I had to take a pair of those AM41’s back. I hated the styling and the extra padding on the inside of the shoe was right on my ankle bone so I could envisage a lot rubbing when they got wet turning into a painful episode. Didn’t want to take that chance…

    avdave2
    Member

    My AM41’s are into their second winter of off road commuting and they’ve been pretty good. When they get a real soaking they go in the airing cupboard overnight stuffed with newspaper which dries them well enough for the next morning. I use them with Sealskinz socks.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    5 10 have had a goretex shoe in development for about a million years but I guess the Elements series is the closest we’re going to get to that

    dunmail
    Member

    I don’t get why the manufacturers of these shoes can’t use a waterproof membrane on some of their offerings.

    Two reasons:

    1. A waterproof membrane keeps water out but it also keeps water in, one reason why fell runners don’t use waterproof shoes, you need to let any water that comes in via the big hole for your leg get out.

    2. Grit and stones – along with water you are going to get these which will soon punch a hole in the membrane rendering it useless so you might as well have bought a cheaper shoe without the marketing hype of “waterproof”.

    Your standard shoe but in a bigger size so that you can fit something like a SealSkinz sock in it without constricting your feet. The grip for hike-a-bike sections is a different problem.

    Premier Icon gallowayboy
    Subscriber

    With a bit of a past in fell running, I struggle with the appearance and functionality of mtb shoes (particularly flats), and i can’t bring myself to buy any. So far I’ve tried fell shoes (don’t grip pedals) Saloman walking shoes (reasonable grip but sponge like) and an old pair of leather Scarpa ranger boots with well worn down vibram soles (reasonable grip, warm, dry and you can hike a bike over mud/rock etc pretty well). After a sodden wet cold day out yesterday in the salomans, I think the old leather walking boots will be my choice from now, and to hell with looks!

    On the other hand santa may bring me some five ten impacts………

    Van Halen
    Member

    the problem with sealskins is they fill up with water too (if you ride in the rain) so just as gopping as a waterproof shoe. they only work as ‘waterproof’ if you use full length waterproof trollies.

    i have some old holed sealskins which keep most of teh water out but also are ruined enough to let water out. they seem a good comprimise.

    i use either proper spds or etnies bmx specific shoes.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    My sealskinz very rarely let water in, now that I use the mid-length ones… The ankle ones were always leaking though.

    avdave2
    Member

    I use the both the mid length and ankle length Sealskinz, with the ankle ones you need a pair of heavy duty Marigolds to turn into waterproof cuffs. With either type you need thin liners to protect the membrane from your toe nails.

    Premier Icon nach
    Subscriber

    It’s not so much the waterproofing, my Sombrios + sealskins aren’t too bad but it’ s the sliding about in the hike-a-bike sections that drives me mad. I suppose a flat sole that sticks to your pedals is inevitably incompatible with a sole that grips on slippy mud on slippy limestone. Anybody find anything that does both?

    I got a pair of waterproof walking boots with vibram soles, and they’re the closest I’ve found to this. The soles are ridged enough that pedal pins go into them okay, but they can grip on mud and wet rocks. The only problem is that they’re sponges if I get caught in a downpour. Someone on here mentioned scuba ankle seals to stop water getting in the top, going to give that a go this winter.

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