First Sportive 100 advice

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  • First Sportive 100 advice
  • cynic-al
    Member

    If you pace yourself and eat/drink well you'll do the 100m OK, you may have a sore backside.

    As for clothes, if the weather is looking changeable take a waterproof in a pocket/bar/seat bag, otherwise most roadies get by with zips and maybe gilets when temperature changes.

    Decent roubaix style tights and a windstopper-fronted jersey should see you OK, if it's a cold day then keep your hands, feet and head warm too.

    foxyrider
    Member

    If you pace yourself and eat/drink well you'll do the 100m OK, you may have a sore backside.

    +1

    the teaboy
    Member

    Second the MTFU.

    If it's a decent-sized field you should be able to tag onto some groups which will make it feel a lot easier.

    I find that I keep warmer on the road bike as it's a consistent effort, not stop-start, wait for a mate mtb!

    New Forest should be pretty flat too.

    Enjoy!

    Marge
    Member

    don't let yourself get carried away in the atmosphere at the beginning.
    Far too easy to jump on someones back wheel & chase.
    Do you ride with a pulse meter? It's a good way to control yourself or at least flag if you are starting to exceed a sensible level.

    clubber
    Member

    Basically what Al said. The two biggest pitfalls of the first time sportive rider are first getting carried away at the start and going too hard – if it's your first one, I'd suggest taking it very easy – to the point that you'll feel like you're slacking – you can push on in the second half if you really have gone too slow. Second, not eating, drinking enough – basically eat more than you think you need to, bring food with you and make sure you drink plenty. If you don't and you bonk/dehydrate it'll take the best part of an hour to recover assuming that you can get food/drink at that point.

    Gary_M
    Member

    Get in a group, you don't want to really do a solo 100 mile ride when everyone else is flying along in groups.

    Do waht you normally do, eat what you normally eat (just more) and you'll be fine. I usually eat something every 30 minutes on a long ride – gels, bars, etc – it works for me.

    Probably a long sleave jersey and a waterproof in your back pocket will be fine but depends on the day.

    Enjoy

    I did one with a similar lack of training and survived fine.

    First 1/3rd – all out as I'd started late and had to make the first feed station before the cut off.

    Middle 1/3rd – cruised round being sociable munching on food and enjoying the view at about 16-17mph.

    Last 1/3rd – didn't realise the course looped past the finishing village so upped the pace with '2' miles to go, only to find another 20miles of pain!

    Mid october isnt too bad, but can be unpredictable, I did it in short sleved jersy and shorts. Check the weather forecast and plan accordingly, if its raining fit mudguards.

    My 'training' involved going for a 4 day weekend in the Peaks and doing a very hilly 60 mile loop every day. Other than that I just grabbed 20mile rides after work here and there.

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    What the others said.

    100 miles is a nice distance for an October ride. Take it steady to begin with, and don't fall into the MTBer trap of attacking every hill. Just ride them steadily and "within yourself".

    Drink plenty. Find out if there is energy drink at the feed stops, and fill your bottles at each one. Also, eat little and often, and never let yourself start to feel hungry. But, equally, don't eat too much and end up with a pot belly..!

    Clothing – October is a funny month, as it can often feel warmer than expected. I'd probably ride in shorts and leg warmers, base layer, a short sleeved jersey, arm warmers and a gilet. Then a thin rain jacket in the jersey pocket. Gloves are personal preference, but I'd have thin full fingered gloves on. If it's raining or a cold start, a cap under the helmet.

    Enjoy..! 😀

    I'm not much of a road rider but have done 3 century rides and I have never done more than half distance as training basically coz I'd rather be out on the mtb, you'll be fine.

    Definately get onto some groups. I suffered a bit on the last one I did as I ended up being alone for a long stretch up on the hills with a head wind as I had lost my mate somewhere at the feed station and seemed to end up in no mans land with no groups, the only group that did pass me were so fast I couldn't tag on!

    For a century I use bottles and Jersey pockets (bars, tube, tyre lever, patches, phone, thin long sleeve top and thin showerproof) with pump fitted to bike. Any other road riding I use a small camelbak as I don't keep bottle cages fitted to my cross bike.

    Premier Icon crazy-legs
    Subscriber

    Roadies use armwarmers, knee (or leg) warmers and gilets cos they weigh nothing and pack down very small, saves carrying jackets etc and they're easy to take on and off.
    You may well scoff at how they look but they're incredibly useful and versatile bits of kit.

    Tube, patch kit, gas can and multitool in a small saddle bag, perhaps a spare tube and pump in a jersey pocket. Phone and cash wrapped in a small plastic bag also in a (zipped!) jersey pocket.

    Otherwise, pace yourself, eat and drink food that you're used to, be sociable and find a group that's going at a comfortable pace. Don't try new energy bars or gels on a ride like that in case they disagree with you!

    You'll have a great time, those Wiggle events are really well organised, loads of food, great atmosphere. Good luck and let us all know how you get on.

    bazzer
    Member

    I know there a few roadies on the forum so I thought I would pick your brains.

    I am doing the 100mile Wiggle New Forest sportive on the 3rd of October. I am new to road riding and bought a Planet-X Carbon SL a little over a month ago, so I have a few questions.

    I have done a couple of 50mile rides and one 70 I am hoping to wing the last 30miles with a bit of MTFU, am I mad ?

    Also clothing, its October and if I was doing an all day MTB ride I would pack my rucksack with clothing to be prepared for the temp dropping or the weather changing. What do roadies do as I don't want to take a pack on my back.

    Any recomendations for jersies and bib shorts ?

    Also anyother tips ?

    Bazzer

    bazzer
    Member

    Wow thanks for the quick responses.

    I am doing it with a few guys from work, they have all done 100s before but many years ago and mainly comute cycle these days. So will have some people to ride with. We have all said we are not interested in gettin a "Time" just finishing. In fact I think we will stop for lunch too 🙂

    Bazzer

    crikey
    Member

    My top tips;
    Set off after half an hour; you get people to pass, and will get caught by faster moving groups so you can tag along if you want to.

    Aim to do a negative split; ride the first half slower than the second.

    Clothing is weather dependent, but try to avoid big blowy waterproofs and chunky overshoes unless you know the weather will be bad enough to justify them.

    Arm warmers and a windproof gilet can be removed if you heat up, similarly, go for thin lightweight gloves that you can stick in a pocket.

    My preference is for oversocks; they keep the worst of the dirt and grit off your shoes without turning into huge soggy neoprene wellies.

    Eat and drink to fuel your riding for hours ahead; what you eat in the first third will fuel you for the second third and so on.

    If you are used to gels, you can use them plus energy drink.

    Although you aren't going for a time, stopping for any more than a few minutes will make you feel worse.

    Above all it's a mind game; know where the half way point is, but don't keep looking at your computer.

    Do mini stretches to avoid getting stiff in your back or neck, and change hand positions often.

    Try to ride one gear easier than your mates; spinning is important.

    Take a CO2 cartridge and a pump; if you puncture, get the tyre on an properly seated using the pump, then use the cartridge; easy to run out of enthusiasm and mojo when you flat.

    Use your brains; don't be the donkey for your group, don't sit out in the wind too much, take care when riding closely with others, especially at the end.

    robinbetts
    Member

    don't fall into the MTBer trap of attacking every hill. Just ride them steadily and "within yourself".

    What are other peoples opinions on this? I'm mainly a mountain biker at the moment but do some road riding, and I've done a lot more road in the past. At the moment, I have a double, so it's not really possible to sit back and spin on steep climbs. Also, I've never been one for spinning and always prefered to blast a hill in the middle ring.

    Is there anything to be said for riding like this if it's more natural? I did a solo 24hour a few months ago (mtb) and everyone was saying spin spin spin, but I found that I felt much better in the later laps when I gave that up and just rode in the middle ring how I would normally.

    crikey
    Member

    The theory is that the seconds you might gain by attacking hills are little compared to the minutes you lose by crawling the last 20 miles after blowing up.

    If you are quick, ride it all quick; blasting up hills then pootling is not that sensible over 100 miles.

    …I also subscribe to the idea that cramp is more related to muscle fatigue than to any electrolyte disturbance, and the easiest way to cramp up at the end of a long day is trying to kick off up hills… YMMV

    clubber
    Member

    Basically it's inefficient – you'll start to really feel it in the second half where you'll really slow down if you blast up hills early on. Really what you're trying to do is stay aerobic the whole way, even more so if you're not used to the distance.

    robinbetts
    Member

    Crikey, I take your point, and I'm certainly not super fast. So do must riders who arn't hitting really fast times ride with triple rings to spin up the hills?

    Also, is there anything to be said for momentum? When I ride my mtb on the road (especially at the end of a long ride) I find it much more draining to drop into 1st and spin on a hill, as you loose all you momentum.

    crikey
    Member

    Depends very much what you mean by spinning, and what you mean by hills!

    On a flat ride like the Manchester 100, I rode it all in the big ring, using the 'hills' to stand up and stretch, but in a pennine 60 miler I used the inner ring and sat down to climb.

    It's less about spinning/not spinning and more about the effort you put in on the hills; blasting up a short climb takes energy for little actual gain in terms of time. My approach is that the same energy is better used to ride quicker over the last 20-30 miles.

    Look at how the pros ride; they don't go daft up hills then sit up, they just ride quick all the time, then quicker still towards the end.

    Premier Icon crazy-legs
    Subscriber

    Each to their own.
    "Spinning" got really popular a little while ago and you hear loads of riders go on about needing low gears to "spin like Lance Armstrong". Most of them forget that they are in no way like LA…

    Personally I ride a normal (39/53) double chainset coupled with a 12-23 cassette but I'm quite lightly built and I like hills, I'm a pretty decent climber. When I did the Fred Whitton and Lakeland Loop Sportives, both of which use Hardknott & Wrynose Passes I used my CX bike with road wheels cos it's got a 34:27 lowest gear which was fine for those hills.

    Some people use compact chainsets (34/50 or 36/50 usually) with a 12-27 cassette, some use triples (30/40/52 usually) with a 12-23 or 12-25 cassette. Whatever works for you. I can't stand spinning up hills, I'd much rather just attack it. Depends a lot on the terrain, length of the route and the type of hill, is it a leg busting 1 in 4 or a gentle 1 in 20?

    crikey
    Member

    …and 'spinning' doesn't need a granny gear; it's more about keeping your cadence up than choosing an easy gear.

    CaptJon
    Member

    Count up until 70, then start counting down.

    crikey
    Member

    I seem to recall reading something years ago about the way that riders would move to lower cadences and harder gears towards the end of long rides/races as a 'natural' thing, and this fits with my experience and with the muscle fatigue/cramp thing I hinted at above; riding at high cadences requires nerve impulses to fire muscle contractions at a higher rate, and I think this is one factor in developing cramp.

    Shove bigger gears towards the end of your ride, basically…

    marting
    Member

    I've done a bundle of these, and some much longer. Some things I've learned the hard way:

    1. Negative splits. If you're not sure how fast to go, the first third should feel really easy; loads of people will go past you – let them. They'll suffer later. Some say 'stay out of the big ring for the first half-hour' until you're warmed up. Aim for a consistent level of effort the whole way round, which inevitably means gently on the hills. Save the heroics for when you've done a few of these and know how to pace yourself.

    2. Arm/leg warmers are brilliant; so much flexibility in keeping warm/cool. I don't care if people don't like the look.

    3. In and out at the feed stops. If you hang around, you'll cool down and stiffen up. Eat and drink on the bike.

    4. Be brutally disciplined about taking in fuel and water. I've even set the alarm on my watch to go off every 15 minutes to remind me. There's not enough glycogen in your body to ride for 100 miles without serious topping up.

    5. If you can ride 70 miles without collapsing, you can ride 100. Don't worry about that bit.

    6. Pay attention and ride steadily in the bunches. Nothing slows you down like a crash.

    7. Don't forget to top up on fluids and eat after the ride, otherwise you'll be dehydrated and feel lousy that evening and the next day.

    Premier Icon brassneck
    Subscriber

    New Forest should be pretty flat too.

    I thought that when I did the last TVT, found out it had around 1300M of climbing… OK not Marmotte territory, but when you'd barely touched a bike for weeks it was more than enough 🙂

    Premier Icon brassneck
    Subscriber

    Oh, bibs – look at ShuttVR – they do basic bibs for 29.99 that look very nice – will be oprdering a pair myself now they are back in stock

    Gary_M
    Member

    loads of people will go past you – let them. They'll suffer later.

    Well that might not really be the case, loads of people will go past you because they are fitter than you.

    Anyway I wouldn't do the lunch stop thing, you'll struggle to get going again.

    crikey
    Member

    …and chamois cream; especially if it's wet or hot; wet means road grit sprayed up unless you've got mudguards, and hot means salty sweat and salt crystals, both of which can start chafing….

    If you're doing it on the 3rd of October watch out for people with bare arms, strange shaped bikes and pointy hats. As there is a Triathlon on the same day.

    Iain

    All of marting's points plus I find it helps to split the ride into chunks being aware that you have all of it to do but concentrate on one chunk at a time so it's not daunting. The last sportive I did had 2600m of climbing in the first 50 miles and it helped to thing 1/10 completed, 2/5 completed, 1/3 complete, 1/2 left…. After halfway mentally it was so much easier.
    In October for clothing I'd use short sleeve top, gillet, arm warmers, shorts with knee warmers or 3/4 length tights. Small rain jacket if there is any chance of getting wet.

Viewing 29 posts - 1 through 29 (of 29 total)

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