• This topic has 113 replies, 70 voices, and was last updated 1 year ago by redmex.
Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 114 total)
  • Favourite dialect / slang / local words and phrases
  • tjagain
    Full Member

    I love the oddities of language despite not being able to spell especially those odd local words of phrases that can be so expressive

    Particular favourites of mine – “hirple” – to limp. “Dreich” – a miserable drizzly day. It just sounds so miserable. “glaiket” – stupid
    “Aye – I ken his faither” – I know his father – disparaging for someone with grandiose ideas

    One I can’t spell tho and no one has been able to help me. a fool or numpty – its pronounced like “tube” but how is it spelled? Tube? choob?

    What have you got?

    perchypanther
    Free Member

    TJ?

    Aye, Ah ken his faither.

    tjagain
    Full Member

    PP – we are all jock Tamsons bairns

    snaps
    Free Member

    “Dreich”

    Carol Kirkwood uses that regularly on BBC weather

    Living in Devon, “dreckly” is a common one short for ‘it will be done directly’ meaning it will be done soon or ‘I’ll be there dreckly’ meaning I’m on my way.

    Cleaning my spd boots with a pressure washer while still wearing them I was told I’d get ‘wet vit’ meaning wet feet!

    somafunk
    Full Member

    One of my favs is “Bawheid”, preferably prefixed with “****”

    donald
    Free Member

    Should be past tense ‘I kent his faither’, emphasising the foolish inexperience of the person being insulted.

    anagallis_arvensis
    Full Member

    I’ve never understood how a cheeselog is a woodlouse in Reading.

    slowoldman
    Full Member

    I’m led to believe Dreckly is similar to Mexican Mañana or Arabic Bukra.

    Rona
    Full Member

    I like (and use) … braw, drookit, wheesht. Also bonny.

    thepurist
    Full Member

    Chap at work uses “cahoochy” to refer to stuff with a gummy or marshmallow consistency – I’d never heard it before.

    Ambrose
    Full Member

    Cwtch= a hug.
    Twp= a bit stupid.
    Igam ogam= zig zag.

    Unfortunately, despite being told otherwise bubble wrap in welsh is not papur popiau, but lapio swigod. Similarly, a microwave (oven) is not a popty ping, it’s a (popty) microdon.

    scaredypants
    Full Member

    Of the scottishisms, I quite like skoosh

    nithered & mafted are about my favourite words from where I grew up

    … apart from croggy, which is the correct term for giving another individual a lift on one’s bicycle. Get yer “backy” right up ya !

    oh, and nesh

    RustySpanner
    Full Member

    Mard.
    Ming.
    Mither.

    offcumden
    Free Member

    Coypsing – To stay at home with one’s girlfriend rather than go out on the beer with the lads.

    Caffled – To lose one’s courage, get cold feet, bottle it.

    Scone – What most in the North would know as a fishcake from the chippy.

    FB-ATB
    Full Member

    The only Welsh I remember from my Dad was ach-y-fi (yuck) and mochyn (pig). Don’t know if I’ve remembered them cos he used them around (or about) me as a kid! Been using them with my kids- for ages my daughter wouldn’t accept pig is the correct name for the animal!

    ebygomm
    Free Member

    Nesh – ‘unusually susceptible to cold weather’

    oldtennisshoes
    Full Member

    Wheesht (possibly the most useful word in the world to parents of mithering kids)
    Mard
    Mither
    Slutch (reminded of this one by Cougar)
    Are some of my favourites.

    oldtennisshoes
    Full Member

    Unfortunately, despite being told otherwise bubble wrap in welsh is not papur popiau, but lapio swigod. Similarly, a microwave (oven) is not a popty ping, it’s a (popty) microdon.

    Brilliant 😃

    duncancallum
    Full Member

    Bawbag
    Dreich

    Appen as in fancy a beer Appen I do. Lancs dialect

    Fettle as in to fix

    Thrutch as in to thrutch a great turd out

    Watrch as in headwartch is a headache and bellywatrch upset stomach

    Crimp a length again turding

    Scrawped scrapped

    slowol
    Full Member

    Well I’ll go the foot of our stairs…

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    Ben the hoose

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    Oh, barry.

    I haven’t heard anyone use that term for decades.

    donald
    Free Member

    nfortunately, despite being told otherwise bubble wrap in welsh is not papur popiau, but lapio swigod. Similarly, a microwave (oven) is not a popty ping, it’s a (popty) microdon.

    You’ll be telling me next that Pysgod Wibli Wobli doesn’t mean jellyfish

    Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    There’s a Scots language show on iPlayer on BBC Scotland, well worth a watch, Rebel tongue, really enjoyed it.

    Watching it I could relate to getting scalded at school for speaking in the Ayrshire vernacular, seems ridiculous now.

    Anyway, ones I use regularly without thinking

    Kelpit – covered in mud, specifically a child!

    Foonart – cold to the bone

    Ersit – Arsey

    Mockit – muddy

    Wonnert – wandered, ie someone who’s ‘no the ful shillin’

    Guffies – English folk

    BaronVonP7
    Free Member

    Skunt. Possibly North Worcestershire.

    Lopsided, skewiff, misaligned.

    As in: “You’ve put that shelf up on the skunt”.

    slowoldman
    Full Member

    How about this beauty?

    “Greenfield ne’er bred a jebber”.

    bigblackshed
    Full Member

    ‘Ow bist gettin won, surry?

    ampthill
    Full Member

    “gana gam yem”

    I was taught this as part of my introduction to teaching in the North East. It means can i go home.

    The icing on the cake was telling this to a Danish national. His reaction was amazing “why do they ask in Danish”

    Simples. It’s a viking remnant.

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Oh, barry.

    I haven’t heard anyone use that term for decades.

    still common usage round here

    IHN
    Full Member

    “I’m stood ‘ere like piffy on a rock bun”

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Thats a good one IHN

    Baffies for slippers

    can we please have translations?

    johnx2
    Free Member

    Appen I do. Lancs dialect

    Conversely, no such dangerous positivity and commitment on the better side of the Pennines, where ‘appen can signal all purpose non-committal as in “you down pub later?” “‘appen.” Means, yeah, happen I will be, or happen I won’t. Handy.

    selkirkbear
    Free Member

    Gutees was a word used for gym shoes when I was at Primary School. Comes from Gutta Percha, the type of rubber used for the soles

    whitestone
    Free Member

    As kids we’d be told: “Go and side up that scrow in your room before tea” (scrow rhymes with cow), i.e. go and tidy up the mess in your room before tea. I’ve heard “side up” or “side away” elsewhere but never heard “scrow” anywhere else.

    This is from the correct, west, side of the pennines.

    RustySpanner
    Full Member

    Again, from the correct side of the Pennines:

    Shape – roughly, to organise oneself.
    ‘Shape yerself’.
    Or my old mums favourite, ‘Our Peter, y’shape like me arse’ (Son, you are a useless ****). She used that one quite a lot. 😃

    Katy Cornered – skew whiff.

    Clart – mud.

    gallowayboy
    Full Member

    Fly cuppy, or just fly…. As in come away Ben the hoose and get yer fly.
    Redd up – let’s get this mess redd up..

    Malvern Rider
    Free Member

    Can’t understand a good portion of my older family when they get into full-tilt. It’s a particularly staccato and hushed-whispered Southern Black Country dire-lickt!

    ‘Gooin owt the wikken’ amya?’
    ‘Ahr, eye-amm-ahr. Am yow?‘
    ‘Ahr, probley, ahr.’
    ‘(silence, except for sound of sister singing upstairs)
    (Laughing) ‘Thet yower Janet?’
    ‘Ahr tiz, ahr’
    ‘Oo’ser think er iz?…Byonsaay?’
    ‘Kinell ahr, dow tho, y’oll mek us loff, an ‘er ‘ates me loffin, ‘er gets a right bag on’
    ‘I ay surproized, er sounds loike a god glaed stuck under a god dower!’

    transl:

    ‘Going out at the weekend, are you?’
    ‘Yes, I am. Yes. Are you?‘
    ‘Yes, probably, yes.’
    ‘(silence, except for sound of sister singing upstairs)
    (Laughing) ‘Is that your Janet?’
    ‘Yes, it is’
    ‘Who does she think she is? Beyoncé?
    ‘**** hell yes! Don’t tho, you’ll make me laugh, and she hates me laughing, she gets a right bag on’
    ‘I’m not surprised, she sounds like a god (curse) gleed* stuck under a god (curse) door!’

    *small piece of coal (when stuck underneath a door it can squeal across floor-tiles)

    redmex
    Free Member

    When one is participating in accurate precision work and an object may need to be moved a bawhair, translated just a tiny bit or a smidge

    TroutWrestler
    Free Member

    Jobbie. I find it intrinsically funny, but I know people who won’t hear it as they deem it too offensive! Bawbags…

    Fannybaws – an ineffective individual.

    StuE
    Full Member

    It’ll be reet

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 114 total)

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