Viewing 18 posts - 1 through 18 (of 18 total)
  • Facebook scam?
  • rockhopperbike
    Full Member

    Hi all,
    recently opened a Facebook account and thought I would try to sell a bike on there,
    had three messages about the bike from different people using exactly the same wording-
    To me this seems dodgy anyway, and the payment method also not quite right.

    ” Ok I take but I would like to come tomorrow but I am currently busy with work, I will send a GLS mailman to your home to give you your money in cash and collect the item.”

    is this a known thing, or am I being paranoid?

    jam-bo
    Full Member

    its a scam.

    rockhopperbike
    Full Member

    though so – if it look like a fish, swims like a fish and smells like a fish – its a fish!

    mashr
    Full Member

    That’s not even a facebook scan, you’ll get exactly the same via Pinkbike, Gumtree, wherever. Feel free to try and lead them a long for a while though, just for funsies

    Cougar
    Full Member

    As ever,

    If you find yourself asking “is this a scam?” then the answer is close enough to “yes” to not be worth the risk.

    (Who the hell says “mailman” outside of the US?)

    bruneep
    Full Member

    you’ll get exactly the same via Pinkbike, Gumtree, wherever

    FB yes, Gumtree amazed that’s still on the go who actually uses that?

    Never ever had that on PB. Sold more on PB than here, PB is my default to buy/sell now.

    ossify
    Full Member

    Gumtree amazed that’s still on the go who actually uses that?

    People that aren’t on facebook?

    prettygreenparrot
    Full Member

    Facebook. Scam.

    rockhopperbike
    Full Member

    report to the FB police and blocked!

    jambourgie
    Free Member

    Who the hell says “mailman” outside of the US?

    Quite right. It’s ‘mailperson’.

    5plusn8
    Free Member

    I use gumtree to by and sell. Its like any other anonymous platform, buyer and seller beware.
    I tend to give my postcode and tell them to call me when they are in the street, I then peek out the window to see if any of my prejudices are pinged.
    So far I have only turned one guy away who came via facebook to buy an MTB frame. He didn’t have a car, looked super dodgy and was quite large. I told him I’d forgotten about our meet and was away, I then watched him go up and down the street and walk on to peoples drives and peer in windows, he tried a couple of doors including mine. So possibly my spidey sense was correct..
    Anyway I videoed him and called cops but they didn’t come.

    jambourgie
    Free Member

    Anyway I videoed him and called cops but they didn’t come.

    Hmm, can’t imagine why?

    Man lists item for sale.

    Buyer arrives to collect item.

    Man phones police.

    maccruiskeen
    Full Member

    Feel free to try and lead them a long for a while though, just for funsies

    Pretty much the worst advice you can give really – the best trick scammers play is convincing people who think they are clever that scammers are stupid. Engaging with them – even if you’re just messing with them – turns you from some random email address into a profile –  you’re just helping them build a picture of yourself that can then be exploited. You’re giving them them the opportunity and  be able to work out how to flatter you and how to distract you. You won’t see the real scam coming. Obvious scams are obvious for a reason.

    I think that is something that bothers me about Facebook offering their marketplace. When you think of other approach routes for a scammer – email, eBay, gumtree etc – they’re all dataless – to email scammers you’re  just one address on a massive list of addresses with no attached pertinent information. Gumtree and eBay profiles are anonymous. I just clicked onto Facebook, clicked on marketplace, clicked on the first item listed and two clicks later I know the vendors name, location, age, sexual persuasion, relationship status ,education, profession,  who all their family member are, who their friends are, their favourite football team is and if I could be bothered I could dig through a decade or so of everything they’ve ever shared online – which for a lot of people can be a long list in to things (rumours, fake news, chain letters, ‘bet you can think of dogs name without a letter Q in it” bullshit that they’ve been taken in by. I also know that…… but what I also know, because the posted the information less than an hour ago, is that they are on holiday.

    I think for the OP – that scam is pretty much as old as the internet, if you had to ask whether its a scam then Facebook, with its complete absence of any oversight or buyer protection – is absolutely the last place you should be seeking to sell stuff. You’re a sitting duck.

    franksinatra
    Full Member

    Alrite M8, is the bike still 4 sale?
    I’ll buy it but I wrk offsure.
    Can u post it to Ireland?
    Thx

    CountZero
    Full Member

    the best trick scammers play is convincing people who think they are clever that scammers are stupid. Engaging with them – even if you’re just messing with them – turns you from some random email address into a profile

    That might be true online, but not for the ones who phone. I take a perverse pleasure out of telling them they’re lying, and not only do I know they’re lying, I can prove it. They don’t hang around to argue the toss.

    ampthill
    Full Member

    So how does the scam work?

    leffeboy
    Full Member

    So how does the scam work?

    I believe that this one works by a fake email then appearing to come from GLS asking you to either make a small payment to confirm your identify/credentials or a fake invoice for insurance before the delivery is made

    From the GLS site
    ‘In this case, the fraudster informs the recipient of the package that a money order has been registered in the recipient’s name. It further states that GLS provides insurance on behalf of the recipient to cover the monetary value of the loss or damage to the package. The purpose of this message is to get the user to click on a link and purchase 3,000 PSC Mastercard coupons.’

    dcwhite1984
    Free Member

    So how does the scam work?

    either what was quoted above, or courier (not a real courier) comes and collects bike and then buyer claims their courier hasnt picked it up etc.

    Lots of scams out there currently, recent company i had on the phone asked me to confirm some details, i refused to confirm anything until they confirmed they were who they said they were, guy got all angry with me and shouted “IM ONLY ASKING YOU TO CONFIRM YOUR AGE” at which point i politely said no, explained why and told him to tell me his age, which he wouldnt do. he failed to see the irony.

    As others have said, if you have to ask the answers yes. Walk away, report and block job done.

Viewing 18 posts - 1 through 18 (of 18 total)

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