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  • Extractor Fan for Ensuite
  • Premier Icon dmorts
    Full Member

    We’re looking to replace and move the extractor fan in our ensuite as it’s not installed in the best place. As the ensuite is small, the best place to have the fan would seem to be over the shower (double shower size). It’s currently about as far from the shower as it could be. We’ve got issues with peeling ceiling paint over the shower and have had some mould issues too.

    I’m considering both standard or inline. Seems some standard fans can go over showers in Zone 1 and be ok. Also wondering whether to get a humidity sensing one. Ideally if it was a humidity sensing one, it would come on with the light switch but stay until humidity is cleared (this is mainly because the extractor fan doesn’t just deal with humidity 🙂 ).

    The other option is inline, perhaps with a run on timer.

    Anyone got any advice?

    Premier Icon jimw
    Free Member

    When we had our building work done three years ago we went from a standard fan with a humidity detector immediately above the shower to an inline one still with the vent above the shower but with the unit installed in the roof space. The latter is more effective as it has a higher through put and, to me just as importantly, is much quieter in the bedroom. Runs on a timer which was a bit of a phaff to set as its in the roof space and involves removing the electrical cover on the unit, but works well.

    Premier Icon stumpy01
    Full Member

    We’ve got an inline in our bathroom. It’s an Aventa AV100T. In hindsight, I probably should have got the 125T, as it is only a tiny bit louder but moves significantly more air. But, it’s fine.

    We considered a humidity sensor one, but figured a fixed time to run would be OK.
    It was a bit louder than I expected, although I think that was down to my expectation rather than any proper reason.
    Last year I ended up re-mounting it on some conical rubber feet, with some small 3-D printed cups to keep it in place. That really knocked out a lot of the noise that was vibration being transmitted through the joists.

    If you’ve got the space, and access to install it relatively easily, I’d go with the inline fan – the standard ones never seem to work very well unless they are venting straight out of a wall with no ducting to cope with.

    The price online for the Aventa fan seems to vary massively from about £40 which I think it what I paid, up to £150!

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    I have fitted two humidity sensor ones. One is a standard one supposedly with a high flow rate. Its poor. the second is a big inline fan and its great. personally i would always go with a humidity sensor now as I loathe the noise of fans and its nice that it does not go on when you get up for a pee in the night

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/manrose-1361-remote-bathroom-fan-humidity-control-with-timer/44376

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/manrose-mf100t-25w-in-line-mixed-flow-fan/719gy

    its both virtually silent ( the fan unit is actually in a cupboard next to the bathroom) and works really well

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Free Member

    I recently got a new extractor fan for the bathroom in the new (to me, but actually ancient) house.

    It’s a Vent Axia Lo-Carbon Revive SELV 7 Kitchen Bathroom Extractor Fan.

    SELV means it has a separate step down transformer you mount away from the wet areas so is only at 24v at the fan so can go in Zone 1 safely.

    Also has a configurable humidity sensor, though this ones runs constantly at a trickle then goes to boost when it senses humidity or you pull a switch. There’s various other things you can do to, like set it so it only boosts if the switch is on for a certain time (so as to avoid the night pee-ing thing).

    https://www.vent-axia.com/range/lo-carbon-reviveselv

    I haven’t fitted it yet though…

    Was £75 brand new off eBay – Vent Axia have them at £700+ or something mental on their site!

    Even still, a bit pricey, but we have bad damp problems so this is one part of a bigger solution…

    Premier Icon FuzzyWuzzy
    Full Member

    When I had my bathroom redone I went from a wall-mount weedy extractor (that didn’t do much) to an inline one in the loft and the opening is in the bathroom ceiling directly above the shower. Works well but as per another poster I wish I’d got something a bit more powerful (I had narrowed it down to a short-list of options and wanted to run the past the electrician to confirm they were all suitable before I picked one – only due to some miscommunication the electrician showed up himself with a couple of models (neither of which I’d heard of) so I just picked the more powerful one.

    It clears the steam just about well enough but if I didn’t have a heated bathroom cabinet mirror it would be annoying as it takes 5-10 minutes to clear the unheated bits of the mirror after I’ve turned the shower off).

    I wouldn’t bother with a humidity sensing model if you get a decent inline one as they shift it quickly enough that by the time you’re done dressing etc. you can just turn it off. A humidity sensor just sounds like something to go wrong and cause problems down the line.

    Premier Icon ji
    Free Member

    How easy are these to fit? Presumably need a vent externally through a wall or eaves, and an electrical connection (via light circuit)?

    Premier Icon johndoh
    Free Member

    I thought the STW answer was the Manrose inline one?

    We have one in each bathroom, both wired to run on after the lights are switched off. They work really well, although I find the one in the smaller en suite clears better (perhaps it’s just because it’s a smaller space).

    Both vents are directly above the shower head and both units are sited to have the shortest possible ducting lengths.

    How easy are these to fit? Presumably need a vent externally through a wall or eaves, and an electrical connection (via light circuit)?

    Technically, to meet regs, they should have an isolation switch too.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    yes – they need to vent to the outside and you need a power supply – lighting circuit will do but IIRC I had some issues with mine and put it on a separate fused spur.

    Premier Icon tonyf1
    Free Member

    Cata do a great range of extractors for zone 2 and IP44 rated. Temperature and humidity display as well that works as a night light. Very quiet as well.

    Premier Icon howsyourdad1
    Full Member

    Just wanted to comment so this thread about extractor fans gets more comments than a rampage Mtb thread

    Premier Icon bigfoot
    Free Member

    Technically, to meet regs, they should have an isolation switch too.

    another advantage of an inline fan, the isolater switch can just go in the loft near the fan

    Premier Icon markspark
    Free Member

    I always fit in-line over wall mounted where ever possible, they are just more effective. Not a fan(!) of humidity sensor ones either, find they have a tendency to run in the middle of the night in summer which can be annoying.
    Ideally you’d fit a fan isolator for maintenance and technically you should also fuse it down to 3amps as per most manufacturers instructions

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    I have not any any issue with my humidity sensors and IMO they are a million times better than ones that go on with the light. I would only have humidity sensors now

    Premier Icon FuzzyWuzzy
    Full Member

    Yeah not sure I’d want one linked to the light – mine just has a separate switch

    Premier Icon alanl
    Free Member

    Technically, to meet regs, they should have an isolation switch too.

    No they don’t.
    I’m presuming you mean a ‘fan isolator’.
    Nothing in the Wiring Regs to say you need one, you do need isolation, but the circuit breaker does that.
    It makes changing a fan slightly easier if there is a local isolation switch, but, how often does that happen?

    Premier Icon kelvin
    Full Member

    (this is mainly because the extractor fan doesn’t just deal with humidity 🙂 ).

    You can get odour sensing fans.

    Premier Icon paton
    Free Member

    Premier Icon HoratioHufnagel
    Free Member

    There’s quite a few decent inline ones on Amazon, usually as part of a “home grow kit”.

    Must be a lot of people growing their own vegetables at home indoors out of sight for some reason, which presumably need significant ventilation, light and carbon filters on the outlet??

    Premier Icon FuzzyWuzzy
    Full Member

    There’s quite a few decent inline ones on Amazon, usually as part of a “home grow kit”.

    Sounds like a good way to get yourself added to a list :p

    Premier Icon wooksterbo
    Full Member

    Nothing to add in terms of which fan, we did have 2 inline fans that were mounted in the loft and 1 in the downstairs toilet, inline can be very noisy if a more powerful model in terms of duct noise specifically. You will want to insulate the duct work too along with trying to get a fall on the ducting to make sure condensation doesn’t pool in the duct work and go mouldy. Although harder to fit, solid ducting is better to not catch water. Condensation will likely still form in the ducting even with the fan off as air from the house will still be pulled/pushed out through the ducting unless you have some sort of flap in there. All sounds complicated but not really, this is just from experience of removing/replacing old fans in the current house.

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