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  • Exercise addicts, how do you cope with getting old?
  • footflaps
    Full Member

    5 weeks ago something went on my back deadlifting

    I’ve had to give up deadlifting as for some reason it just seems to trigger my back more and more. Did used to have 2x BW deadlift a few years ago, now going over BW can set it off. Was my favourite exercise as well.

    hardtailonly
    Full Member

    and I’ve just gone back to bed to sleep, at 14:38 in the afternoon.

    After two pretty good nights’ sleep

    Lots of stuff on this thread about getting some “help for where your head’s at” … and your experience this afternoon may all be tied up with that …

    But, have you got yourself checked out physically too? Any other symptoms? If that’s something that has changed over recent weeks/months, that might be worth checking out too.

    dyna-ti
    Full Member

    Just going with the flow. Keep walking, keep riding, but you cant avoid the unavoidable.

    You get old

    You die

    The extended family whom you’d never invite over for Christmas dinner, ransack your house, and sell off your prized possessions for whatever they can get.

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    Wee update…

    Woke up Monday morning 3 weeks ago feeling much chiperer for no apparent reason, and have felt a bit better since then.
    Did two fantastic rides with the kids, one at Hamsters and one at Whinlatter.

    OMG Hamsterley is soooooo good. ( so long as you don’t fo the far SW bit.) The wean was buzzing and we even went back up to do the stuff from the mast past Accelerator twice.

    Whinlatter was a bit messy as I got a call from a mate who had lost his 7 year old son and got a ripped tube at the same time. I sent my boys off on their own and had to track the kid down and then tried to catch up my kids. Warp speed. 🙂
    I eventually met them as they were coming down from the north loop. Never seen them so wired and buzzing. They were so hyper. It was lovely. Anyway, they repeated the south side with me and it was such a lovely day.
    Really made me realise the good side of biking.

    Also realised I am getting too stressed with work. Danger signs all over the place.
    Took half a day off yesterday and am currently packing the car to go to the Lakes. So excited 🙂

    theotherjonv
    Full Member

    Great – missed this thread first time but I know what you mean. I suspect a lot has already been said, so apologies for scan reading only but key for me at 53 is to stop comparing myself to others, particularly younger others, and also younger me. And just celebrate what I can do. I can do a century road ride, I can still clean most of the climbs I considered hard when I was younger, it just takes me longer than it used to.

    In fact – that makes me better than I used to be. Climbing a tough hill requires me to be at close to full effort, to counter the 10kg and 10 years extra. It used to be full effort just because that’s how you climb hills isn’t it? No sense going half arsed. So the difference now is that I’m same effort level on the engine, but for, 15% longer. Surely that makes me proper nails! And compared to the skinny youngsters that only put that effort in for half the time we do…..

    The thing that does get me down is injury and just wear and tear. I have bad knees, ankles and hips, family history of arthritis and currently knee is fecked badly enough that I can’t consider any kind of proper ride. All caused by a run to catch a bus followed by a bit too much beer fuelled walking which discomfort would have stopped. If I had to compromise I’d happily live with 53 year me capability if I could have 23 or 33 year old me robustness.

    teamslug
    Full Member

    Read Joe Freil – Faster after 50. Good insights into what happens to the body ( and mind) as you get older. I’ve started doing more gravel type riding as the more consistent effort is suiting me a lot more. I also lift weights but heavy and only a few reps to try to slow down the inevitable muscle atrophy. ( I’m 57).

    monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    Why must it be heavy and only a few reps?Genuinely interested because I do the opposite.(I’m 59).
    PS should get that Joe Freil book.

    crazy-legs
    Full Member

    From GCN just the other day, an interview with The Nicest Man in Mountain Biking about being old and still being on the podium!

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    Currently sat at home looking at the sunshine outside. It’s 11am and gorgeous.
    I bled my brakes yesterday, packed my bag and charged my lights. All ready to go for a bit of Cut Gate today.

    And here I am, surfing the Internet like a ****. Derailed somewhere between coffee and departure. I’ve given up on Cut Gate as it’ll be shite. It’s not rained for a week so it’s probably dry, and TBH the top bit might even be frozen. Views will probably be limited to 20 or 30 miles of glorious crisp air.
    But in my current state I can’t think of any way it’ll make a good day out.
    So I was thinking of riding from home, like I do when my mind goes medium dark. A good 60km of road riding required to get to the trails. Shall I take the Anthem to make the tarmac bearable or shall I really make the day unpleasant and take the Occam with 2.6DHFs and inserts…

    I could change tyres on the Occam instead, then the 25km to Hayfield would be bearable and Jacobs would be actually fun.
    Maybe I’ll do that…

    Or not. Been at least 8 minutes since I checked UKC and the STW homepage. I think I’ll just have another surf and see if I can read about someone whose less of a sad **** than I am and actually has a life.

    Maybe I’ll go out this evening, lights are charged after all.

    wbo
    Free Member

    I don’t think it matters what you do as long as you get out, tho’ CutGate sounds a lot better. But get out in sunlight.

    This is a day you train for, not a training day. Says the man eating fast as poss so he can get out ….

    cvilla
    Full Member

    Same here…had that coffee…some blue sky….up near the lakes….you coming out or what….I’m on gravel today:)

    monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    Been a bit like this lately,aches and pains plus dark and damp ain’t fun.Suggest you just get out and battle on.I,ve decided if it’s hurting at least its working.KEEP MOVING.

    hardtailonly
    Full Member

    I’ve given up on Cut Gate as it’ll be shite.

    You were right. It was shite. Virtually no running rivers on the trail. Hardly any bog at the top. Grippy grassy ruts down the other side to slippery stones. Absolute Bo**cks!

    Sorry you didn’t make it out … hope you manage to grab some ‘get up & go’ from somewhere and enjoy being out.

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    You were right. It was shite. Virtually no running rivers on the trail. Hardly any bog at the top. Grippy grassy ruts down the other side to slippery stones. Absolute Bo**cks

    😉

    Yep, it looked like that sort of day TBH. About the 10th one this summer I’ve missed. Even in manc it didn’t do its normal cloudover at 11am thing.

    Anyway, I went back to bed till 3:30

    sirromj
    Full Member

    No experience of it myself, but thoroughly recommend you all try some pommel bucket training.

    sirromj
    Full Member

    I only put that video ^^^ up after seeing this guy doing it in one of his videos and it amused me. Here’s his callisthenics at 50+ video:

    fatbikedog
    Free Member

    It is a fact that as we get older we start to loose it. But don,t use that as an excuse to not do things. Lower your expectations and enjoy being out. I ride most weekends unless I have some other hobby going on. I have discovered bikepacking this year. I go at my own at my pace and my distance. I plan it to be flexible so if I,ve had enough I can stop. Tomorrow I will be out celebrating Global Fatbike day with 30 or so others in the wonderful Forest of Dean. Its not a race! and thats the point. It,s an experience to be enjoyed on your own or with others. I dont do Strava or anything like that. My rides are measured in fun. I am 67 and have never been fast, super skilled or any kind of athlete but it,s still good fun.

    eddiebaby
    Full Member

    I just ride what feels right in terms of effort or threat to safety. In just short of 70 and know i can’t do what i used to. I won’t kitesurf any more as I don’t get enough time on the water to be safe with a kite.
    On the other hand I have started wingfoiling. It is all about risk management. The size of drops I go for now is tiny because I heal slower and ground has got harder. Water though seems to be no wetter, so that’s where I’m doing stuff for fun and riding my ss gracel bike for fitness.

    BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    Yep, it looked like that sort of day TBH. About the 10th one this summer I’ve missed.

    You know it’s December, right? 😉

    mattsccm
    Free Member

    I just ache a lot and feel grumpy when I remember that I am 59 not 18. Time trial times peaked in 2019. 2020 was a limited season of course and 21 not a lot better. this February I realised that all my cycling club mates ahd spent the winter on Zwift not commuting 20 miles daily and were thus way fitter than me. Climbing and even back packing are probably gone dure to knackered knees plus arthristis in hands.
    Trying to tell myself to spend the winter on Zwift and do stacks of pressups and curls.
    Hmmm
    Hope to not give in gracefully but do a mental Ukraine

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    You know it’s December, right?

    Ah, good point. Thank god, this year has sucked. I’m still at mid summer in terms of stuff achieved this year.

    YoKaiser
    Free Member

    Timely thread and some interesting reading. I’m currently re-evaluating what I’m doing,the last few years has seen some injuries and missed targets,mostly through a lack of intelligent training and the catch all excuse of getting older.

    This has led me to watching and reading some stuff from Dr Peter Attia and his thoughts on exercise and longevity. Lots of sensible stuff and I’m trying to implement it into what I do. 2/3 strength and mobility workouts and 2/3 aerobic workouts focussing on low to moderate (zone2) work with maybe only one lungbuster. I’m coupling this with some of the knees over toes guy stuff and the Bioneer on YouTube. It’s goes against the grain of my old way of doing the same thing but trying harder until I’m bored or injured, and really trying to cover the bases. Funnily enough he cites balance as being an important skill set as we get older and as mentioned mostly working in zone2,it’s making quite a convincing case for an ebike.

    BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    Ah, good point. Thank god, this year has sucked. I’m still at mid summer in terms of stuff achieved this year.

    Sometimes it’s enough just to be out riding your bike. It’s a shame you didn’t make it over yesterday morning, we didn’t do anything dramatic, but stuff was riding surprisingly well and the sun was shining. Looks like it might start freezing overnight in the next week or so too 🙂

    Del
    Full Member

    I got a new Garmin a few months ago. It’s an fr255 so biased towards running. It suggests a run every day based on accumulated effort, sleep, and other stuff. It’s suprised me how often it tells me I’ve had a shit night’s sleep and recommends a recovery run at z2. This and the body battery indicators are two reasons why I updated. Useful by my reckoning.

    no_eyed_deer
    Free Member

    I haven’t time to read all of this thread, but at 45, after competing at national-level cross country running when I was a junior, then getting properly back into running, cycling and swimming seriously again when I was nearly 30, and spending the past 16 years doing between 6-20 hours exercise a week often at a very high intensity, I developed an episode of attrial fibrulation 6 months ago while swimming. It’s probably due to genetic factors, combined with (long-treated) essential hypertension, but also the level and intensity of exercise I’ve been doing, oh and age of course 😆

    Being admitted urgently into the Emergency Department and ‘shocked’ back into normal heart rythmn was frankly an absolutley terifying experience and definitely not something I wish to repeat again.

    As a result, I’ve now cut everything down a great deal, reduced my exercise intensity down to mostly aerobic ‘zone 3’ using a heart rate monitor, and as a result am finding I’m actually less stressed about exercise and actually enjoying it more.

    thecaptain
    Free Member

    Perhaps I’m lucky in some ways that my preferred sport is marathon running, which lends itself to low intensity training for the most part. But for every fit person who has unexpected heart problems in their 40s or 50s, there must be dozens of unfit people so afflicted. Not to mention the other health issues that come with lack of exercise.

    Besides, now I’m well past 50 I’m too old to die tragically young.

    I’m at the point where I have to look to WAVA tables for any further improvements though. Basically hoping to get older quicker than I get slower!

    Andy-R
    Full Member

    I came to mountain biking late (around 36, which was 1988, so not late in the mtb world) after m/cycle trials, enduro and sled dog racing. The fortunate side of it is that I was a far better trials rider than enduro rider and so outright speed hasn’t always been the over riding aspect of what I’ve done – ok, in sled dog racing it is but that wasn’t all down to me….
    So now I get my satisfaction (now that I’m 70…) from seeking out technical descents and climbs and attempting to ride them clean, mixed in with a razz around some of my lifetime favourite areas. I don’t think it’s exaggerating to say that I’m a better technical rider now than I ever was – people sometimes say to me “enter some enduros, man, you’ve got the skills”.
    Skills yes, speed (and bravery) no longer, so I just do what I can do the best I can and try to take something really positive back from every ride – to replay in those bleak, sleepless hours at 4am or even in however many years (or months) when I can no longer do the little that I’m capable of now.
    We will all (if we’re lucky) grow old and less capable than we formerly were but we should just accept it (and I know it’s not easy) because to do otherwise leads to pain and depression.
    Don’t ask me how I know this….

    monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    ^Nice post mate,thanks.

    Andy-R
    Full Member

    monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    ^Nice post mate,thanks.

    Thanks, man – it’s just basically how I feel now. Some days it’s an effort to motivate myself to get out the door and ride but afterwards I’m always glad that I did. And trailbuilding – bloody hard work but well worth it especially when others are appreciative. I have plenty of free time and the tools plus I enjoy it at least as much as riding.

    Harry_the_Spider
    Full Member

    54 next week.

    Had a miserable year with a hernia and torn meniscus in my knee. Hernia now fixed and the knee is manageable with a bit of care.

    Going for my 1st Dan Karate now and intend to get back out on the bike.

    IdleJon
    Full Member

    Besides, now I’m well past 50 I’m too old to die tragically young.

    That made me laugh, I hadn’t thought of that. ‘At least he died doing what he loved!’ ‘Eating mince pies, drinking wine and listening to unreasonably loud music?’

    BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    We will all (if we’re lucky) grow old and less capable than we formerly were but we should just accept it (and I know it’s not easy) because to do otherwise leads to pain and depression.

    I guess that’s one way of looking at it, but a slightly different angle isn’t so much to just ‘accept it’, but to be proactive and systematic about maintaining the aspects of your fitness that do deteriorate with age, while still accepting that your ceiling is lower than it was. So I make an effort to still work on strength and high intensity efforts, but also accept that recovery isn’t as quick as it used to be and there’s still a drop-off over time, though it’s less pronounced than it would be. It doesn’t cause me pain and depression, but then I guess it depends on how you’re wired.

    Ultimately I suppose there are two aspects to ageing – and this thread – one is the physiological side of what you can do to maintain performance, the other is the mental thing of how you react. Ultimately though, it’s about getting joy from riding bikes and for me, part of that, is being as capable as I can be within the parameters than I can’t change. The worst thing I’ve had to deal with was 18 months off the bike with long covid and I’m still getting back to where I was before that, but I’m actually really enjoying the process. Waffle, blather, shoot me now 🙂

    kennyp
    Free Member

    Okay, my tuppenceworth.

    1. We are all getting older. There’s nothing can stop that. Deal with it.

    2. We can’t stop getting older but can make better use of our days (well I certainly can……and thinking about it, will). Stop wasting time with trivial nonsense.

    3. Don’t get hung up on stats (they will inevitably decline) or trying to be competitive. Just enjoy what you do.

    4. Ignore point 3 above if you want. If competition is what drives you then great. There are loads of sports with veterans, seniors, old gits etc categories. Just don’t overdo the training.

    5. Stretch more and do strength training. Oh and keep your brain active too.

    6. Accept the fact you aren’t as fast or as strong or as supple as you were. Don’t compare the 60 year old you to the 30 year old you. Caveat; with many endurance events you may well improve into your 50s.

    7. If you can’t compete as much then volunteer instead. Loads of clubs, races, events etc need people to help out.

    8. Meet up with old mates every now and again, sink a few beers and reminisce over all the daft adventures you’ve had, including the miserable ones in the cold and the rain and the ice. And remember to complain that youngsters today aren’t nearly as fast/skilled/tough as you and your mates were. That last bit is vital!

    9. For many folk (not all I concede, especially at the moment) one advantage of getting older is having more spare cash. Treat yourself to some nice new kit. Alternatively, if you have the money to buy, say, a £4,000 mountain bike why not buy a £2,000 mountain bike (will you really notice the difference) and treat the family to a lovely holiday. Or give the cash to charity.

    10. Take up something new. I still ride, run, walk, swim, ski etc but a couple of years ago took up croquet (yes I know, it has a reputation, partly deserved, mostly not). Turns out I’m quite decent at it. And while my riding, running etc is gradually getting worse, my croquet is still improving. And I should be able to play for a long time yet (last summer I played a woman aged 92 who is still a good player).

    11. Stop reading this and go for a bike ride.

    12. Did you not read point 11 properly?

    chevychase
    Free Member

    All these people who say they’re 50 and getting old (I’m 49).

    Stop kidding yourself. Your sofa is just too comfortable.

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    Right people. The good news is that I’ve sussed out what the problem is….

    Burnout.

    Using threats of an evil nature, the missus dragged me away from my desk at 3pm to watch a seminar from her company on Burnout. It was a revelation. Every few minutes she snorted and turned to me ..

    ” what have I been telling you”
    ” that’s you that is”
    “See”
    Etc etc.
    And she was completely right. It’s been building since late spring and really escalated last few weeks.
    To the point where on Sunday I completely lost it, screamed and yelled and punched a hole in a door. Then cried.

    The question is… Will I successfully manage to do something about it?

    TBC no doubt…

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    PS the burnout is from work, not exercise.

    PS2. Good post kennyp

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    I completely lost it, screamed and yelled and punched a hole in a door. Then cried.

    The question is… Will I successfully manage to do something about it?

    If you’ve no time due to work, how about just getting a joiner in?

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    If you’ve no time due to work, how about just getting a joiner in?

    Like 🙂

    fasthaggis
    Full Member

    Top marks kennyp, an excellent post.😊

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