Viewing 34 posts - 41 through 74 (of 74 total)
  • Exercise addicts, how do you cope with getting old?
  • RoterStern
    Free Member

    I’ve been racing bikes since my mid 20s. I am now 53 and what I lack in top end I make up for in being able to push hard for much longer than when I was younger. The classic analogy is my engine is more diesel than petrol. I do more miles now than I did 10 years ago, too (half od my kids are of adult age now so have more time for non family stuff).

    wbo
    Free Member

    I’m older than you, and still battling on. Sopmetimes I’m still improving but I tihnk for that you need to
    1. You’re not young and new rules apply
    2. Get your sleep under control else everything else you do is pissing in the wind. Poor sleep = poor health = poor fitness
    3. You might need to think how you’re training a bit more. Going out and random thrashing isn’t very effective

    I kind of assume that nothing good happens quickly anymore, but I’d likely make an exception for the benefits of good sleep, and mental health

    continuity
    Full Member

    We’ve spoken before about this, but here are the things you are leaving on the table:

    Managing your medical condition optimally
    Getting a solid 8 a night
    Sleep hygeine and routine (read why we sleep)
    Macro periodization
    Micro periodization
    Progressive overload
    Formalised rest
    SMART (T especially) goals
    Healthy habits to get to the goals
    (Ps get a coach for the last 6)
    Performance minded approach to diet feat. Sufficient water, protein and quality micros
    Putting some grease in your goodamn rear hub (part of the reason I always disappear on descents ;-)).
    Recovery activities
    Yoga
    Strength training (you’re over 50, this is more important than it was before)
    Blood tests to establish a baseline
    Recovery tracking
    Aero
    Waxing your chain
    Putting less pressure in your tyres
    Not carrying a 35l backpack on every 3hr ride
    Trying new sports and diversifying

    You aren’t giving yourself a chance to be faster and to achieve things that have value for you. Until you’ve addressed all of the above, you are whining (and being unkind to yourself). Age and treachery will overcome youth and skill.

    freeagent
    Free Member

    Get some help for your head. If your leg was broken you would go to the leg doctor so if your head is broken go to the head doctor.

    I have done so and it helps

    This +1.

    Also i think you need to change your focus – i’m 50 in a few weeks and although i was never any good at cycling i think slower/longer rides are going to be the way to go.
    I did the RideLondon100 this year and was overtaken/beaten by many people who looked a lot older than me.

    onewheelgood
    Full Member

    I’m 63. I’m still getting PRs on both road and MTB routes (although TBH I wasn’t ever that quick to start with). I met a guy in the cafe recently who was in his mid-80s and was two thirds of the way round a 100mile ride. What you actually do might be different, and maybe you can’t target being ‘the fastest’ any more, but you can still challenge yourself and if you want to be competitive you can still see how you rank against your age group. Since I turned 50 I’ve been saying to my riding buddies, who tend to be a bit younger than me, that this will be the year that age wins over training and I will get slower – it still hasn’t happened, partly because I’ve got more time to train these days. My ambition now is to become one of those wiry old cyclists who can knock off a 200k Audax and then ride 150k home again without even thinking about it.

    IdleJon
    Full Member

    Rage rage against the dying of the light.

    I like the fact that TJ posted on either side of that quote on his epic journey, and when he passed through this area I took him to the pub where the author of those words drank. (Among many other pubs!)

    DrT
    Free Member

    I regularly have to recalibrate my expectations of what I can do, driven by I’ll health rather than age (although I am older than you). The ‘sort your head out’ approach is certainly the best for me. I was never better than a mediocre rider but I rode a lot and did a lot of big epic rides. That’s all beyond me now and my riding is e-bike assisted and generally involves taking a book and a flask of tea to somewhere with a nice view to take in. I also started new things, weight training and climbing are new to me and all done around my physical limitations (and less looking back at the old me). But enjoying them is about recalibration of expectations and realising I can still enjoy stuff, just not pushing myself at the same level as I could before.

    Gunz
    Full Member

    51 here and still managing meaningful activity. It’s probably been mentioned that a lot of older gentlemen fail to do any resistance training. I’m lucky as I’m in the military and our on site gym does has circuit training at lunchtime. My amateur assessment is that this sort of HIT produces benefits way beyond the time invested but is avoided by a lot of people because it’s frankly often bloody hard. Why not see of a local gym offers something similar.
    I’ve also adopted a little and often approach to cycling and I feel a lot better for it (happier and faster).

    olddonald
    Full Member

    Approaching 57 here. I do miss competition – and training – however you can still get this as many have said over shorter distances – I did a PB at Park run on Saturday – however I am well behind Older Vets who smash out 20-21 minute hilly park runs. Me – I just enjoy the competitive run. Aiming for some longer off road runs in the lakes next year and the great north Swim (both low impact). Good points about resistance training – need to think about that.

    BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    Oh, fwiw, you don’t strictly seem to be taking about ‘exercise addiction’, more a need to experience new and exciting stuff and feel you’ve achieved something, which is somewhat different, I think, though I guess there are obvious parallels in the space they fill in you.

    I suspect that I’m loosely exercise / activity dependent, so when I couldn’t really do anything for 18 months thanks to long covid, I had to find other ways of staying approximately sane. Turns out that mediation and mindfulness generally works pretty well to help you reframe things and be more accepting of life generally.

    Also, you do seem to have a slightly grandiose penchant for the epic, which I get because a part of me used to lean that way too, but just because something’s not hugely difficult or technically hard doesn’t mean that it has no value. I’ve come to appreciate my local trails just as much as further flung stuff, maybe more. I like the way lines and textures change along with the seasons and the weather, even the sound you tyres make on different surfaces. Anyway… be there more would be my advice 🙂

    hardtailonly
    Full Member

    I’m 54, and only really got into outdoor stuff in my mid-late 30s. Dabbled in a few things and for the last 10 years, riding has been my #1 choice of activity. Having had 2 marriages and 2 families, I never really had years of solo adventures or pushing the limits of fitness and/or adrenaline stuff.

    So, most of my cycling has been on an upward curve, in terms of skill, fitness, places to ride, explore and appreciate. And in lots of ways, it still is.

    I don’t have your longer history, or variety of stuff you’ve been into. But I do, absolutely, ‘need’ and crave exercise. I need to do ‘something’ most days, or I just end up restless and a little bit grumpy, sometimes resentful.

    Most of my motivation, though, is about head space, me-time, being in the outdoors (mostly) whatever the weather. I’m no longer that motivated by being fitter or faster than I was, say, 5 years ago (albeit I don’t want to decline/age too quickly, so I do take some care over lifestyle, diet etc). I do set some goals or challenges that push me out of my comfort zone (a road 400km in a day, and my first Enduro this year) … and things like a recent weekend riding in the Lakes always challenge me from both a fitness and technical/skills point of view, but I also get great satisfaction with a 2 hour SS local XC blast, a 1 hour gravel bimble, or an overnight bike-packer either solo or with a mate. So, from that point of view, I’m fairly ‘easy-to-please’.

    I have started to think about ageing and what exercise may look like for the next 10/20/30 years. Partly, reading this thread has prompted me to consider taking training and nutrition a bit more seriously; I’ll likely buy the ‘faster at 50’ book, not to try and make me better/fitter than 10 years ago, but to try and make the next, hopefully, 30 years of exercise as close to a plateau as possible rather than just a decline.

    But I also think it’s partly (mainly) about mindset. Its about appreciating and valuing what you can do and what you are capable of, rather than constantly putting yourself under pressure to be better (be fitter / have ‘better’ adventures/experiences) than your younger self. It’s about finding peace and satisfaction in the here and now, giving more credence to being in the moment rather than fearing the moment doesn’t live up to all your previous moments.

    So, yeah. Some of the advice on here will help resist/slow the decline associated with age, and help you perform ‘respectably’ compared to your younger self. Some it will be adapting, playing to your strengths as an older athlete … and the stuff about rest/sleep/nutrition will help with that, as well as choosing goals and challenges more thoughtfully. But mostly, I reckon for you to continue to enjoy exercise for the next 30 years, it’s all about what you do with your head, your attitude and approach to it, and finding a way of being at peace with whatever stage you are at in your life.

    thecaptain
    Free Member

    Answer 1: if you’re getting a lot slower/weaker at 50, see a doctor, that’s not normal. I set my marathon PB aged 50. Past that, sure, you’ll probably go gently downhill. but it shouldn’t be a nosedive. Which brings me to answer 2: if you think getting older sucks, consider the alternative. My sister only made it to 52 and her last few years weren’t great (cancer).

    dogbone
    Full Member

    I’m 55 and got a dog. Weekend trail runs are at her pace – squirrel! – and focusing on the pleasure of trotting along somewhere nice. My brother is a very competitive runner (Vets international level) but doesn’t seem to enjoy his running more than me.

    Spin
    Free Member
    cb200
    Free Member

    We’ve spoken before about this, but here are the things you are leaving on the table:

    Managing your medical condition optimally
    Getting a solid 8 a night
    Sleep hygeine and routine (read why we sleep)
    Macro periodization
    Micro periodization
    Progressive overload
    Formalised rest
    SMART (T especially) goals
    Healthy habits to get to the goals
    (Ps get a coach for the last 6)
    Performance minded approach to diet feat. Sufficient water, protein and quality micros
    Putting some grease in your goodamn rear hub (part of the reason I always disappear on descents ;-)).
    Recovery activities
    Yoga
    Strength training (you’re over 50, this is more important than it was before)
    Blood tests to establish a baseline
    Recovery tracking
    Aero
    Waxing your chain
    Putting less pressure in your tyres
    Not carrying a 35l backpack on every 3hr ride
    Trying new sports and diversifying

    I’m exhausted just thinking about that lot! How do you find time to ride?

    I’m a bit intimidated by your intensity.

    stanley
    Full Member

    @BadlyWiredDog

    I need you to be my coach 🙂

    continuity
    Full Member

    @cb200

    I don’t have kids yet!

    The point I was making was less ‘your life is valueless unless you adhere to this cult of wellness’, but more ‘unless you give yourself a fair and objective chance at things, there is a good chance the only thing that is actually deteriorating is your sense of self worth’. It could be when you did all these things you were proud of you were getting 8hrs sleep a night, but now are getting 5 but you’re blaming age. No, get more sleep!

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    Right, sorry. So many good points to respond to that I wanted a keyboard. But I don’t got one so phone it is…OK

    1) to be clear, when I say ‘good at…’ I don’t really mean good, I mean OK. Let’s be honest, I’m just a middle aged IT Man… you get the drift

    2) I’ve got a wee cold/ manflu this week. Clearly I had it at the weekend too, which exasperated my low (PS, don’t you love that malapropism? Someone I worked with used it all the time without even realising)

    3) lack of sleep/ tiredness is indeed the main issue here. I’m actually fairly at ease with getting old. It’s the terminal lack of sleep that I currently have which is killing me. When I was 40 I could quite happily have a shit night sleep and then do the Fred. Nowadays I can’t.

    I’ve had a few moments where I’ve had a massive drop off in fitness, and every time I’ve thought ‘this is it, I’m old and done for’, and every time so far the real reason has been lack of sleep. Get that sorted first and see how things pan out

    God I wish I could 🙁

    4) speed versus distance… not sure where I gave the wrong impression, but to be clear I have no interest in speed or power at all. I have two aims when cycling without my kids: 1) to clean as much as I can and 2)to go as far as I can.
    I have never been fast or powerful on a bike I think I have only ever done 20mph on a bike once properly solo ( ie 20 miles in an hour). When me and conti did Cut Gate last weekend he sets off to get a PB and I settle down into a slow plod to see if I can do the ascent in 1 go ( I can’t, yet).
    So yes totally on board with the distance thing, almost all my cycle goals are distance related.

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    Poor sleep = poor health = poor fitness

    Word! 😛

    You might need to think how you’re training a bit more. Going out and random thrashing isn’t very effective

    Yep, I’ve only just realised this really. I plan to be more structured in future.

    Oh, fwiw, you don’t strictly seem to be taking about ‘exercise addiction’, more a need to experience new and exciting stuff and feel you’ve achieved something, 

    Agreed. Didn’t want to talk about adrenaline junkie or any of that cringe stuff, and I thought that I had successfully replaced the extreme ( ish) with the exercise, but clearly not.

    Also, you do seem to have a slightly grandiose penchant for the epic, which I get because a part of me used to lean that way too, but just because something’s not hugely difficult or technically hard doesn’t mean that it has no value. I’ve come to appreciate my local trails just as much as further flung stuff, maybe more.

    I have a real problem going out for a short ride. I think whether it’ll involve a decent distance 60km or 1,500m minimum or some especially interesting/ techie sections…. if it doesn’t then I just CBA. I have this stupid idea that if a ride isn’t utterly amazeballs then there’s no point. And if i do plan something then I just don’t sleep the night before and am a mess.
    Like in July, when it first got really hot I drove out to Hayfield on Saturday and parked. I sat in the car fir 15 minutes trying to work out in my mind how to get a ” good” ride in. I was knackered and demotivated, and ended up driving back home. The next day I realised that there was no point in repeating the process so I would start the ride from home. 4 hours later on Roych Clough I finally hit the wall and then limped home in the heat completely exhausted. No idea why I did it.

    And tbh no idea why I’m telling you this. I’m just rambling.

    PS. Big thanks to whassname for the PM. I need to look at that.

    ditch_jockey
    Full Member

    Leaving aside the fitness side of it, would it not be worth your while investing some time with a counsellor? Given you’ve referenced low self-esteem quite a bit, that’s a hard ‘demon’ to battle with feats of athleticism as you get older. If you can shake off that burden, then you can get on with enjoying your life through your fifties.
    For what it’s worth, I’ve never reached the level of fitness that you seem to have, but during my fifties, I shifted focus in my career, notched up several outdoor qualifications, including my Winter ML, and gained a great sense of achievement and satisfaction along the way. I’ve just turned 60 this year, and in a similar fashion to Scotroutes, I’ve started spending a bit of time working on my photography skills as a way of adding a bit of value and interest to my time outside, although I’m not entirely convinced lugging a rucksack full of camera equipment to the top of a hill for sunrise counts as a particularly easy option.

    Whatever route you take, I hope you get that self-esteem monkey off your back, and find the space to enjoy life a bit.

    LD
    Free Member

    Cheers for an interesting thread!
    I’m in a very similar position (in terms of historical adventures and current feelings on (lack of) fitness) but probably slightly less worried about it.
    Not sure about the structured training thing, I think it would remove the enjoyment for me. I ride (canoe, scramble, climb etc) to have fun and to burn calories to allow me to eat more! However need to balance this with the desire to be fit enough to enjoy big adventures without ending up exhausted.
    I also need to learn to temper my own expectations of my body as I can’t just go do some of the things I used to.
    The Strava debate is another interesting one. When out solo I tend to push myself and I make myself aware that Strava is watching which makes me work harder. Maybe I should try going out without it to see if I enjoy it more just going at mellow pace and appreciating my surroundings.
    Definitely want to keep having adventures as I think I would really struggle mentally without them. I just need to figure out what my body can still do and how to keep enjoying the great outdoors without breaking myself.

    nickc
    Full Member

    almost all my cycle goals are distance related.

    All my cycling goals are “having fun” related. I have a rough goal in mind when I mountain bike in terms of what a”ride” is. It’s about 30km and about 1000m of ascent. But other than that I ride to put a smile on my face. On the weekend I did just shy of both of those, but – and this is the crucial bit. I had a heap of fun, I cleared a couple of sections that I’ve puzzled over, and a change in diet has meant some more leg power which has made me happy.

    It sounds very much like you use sport (if you don’t mind it being said) as a crutch. I think you probably are coming round to the fact that it’s not that aspect (the sport) that needs your attention. I hope you get it sorted.

    weeksy
    Full Member

    The Strava debate is another interesting one. When out solo I tend to push myself and I make myself aware that Strava is watching which makes me work harder.

    I removed Strava this year, only installing it last week to time myself on a race-course, but removed again… It’s helped massively… Sometimes i go hard, sometimes i go easy… but it does remove the ‘need’ to go hard that Strava brings often.

    nickc
    Full Member

    Oh yes, getting shot of Strava was – for me at least, a weight off my shoulders that I didn’t realise was there. I was starting to look at some segments in a way that wasn’t helpful for what I want to do. Removing the time element from my riding has helped massively

    GolfChick
    Free Member

    Have you seen the Dr about your lack of sleep for the skin condition? By which I mean have you tried some sort of sleeping tablets that will be strong enough to actually put you to sleep? I’m with you on the lack of sleep is crippling but which a lot of people dont appreciate. My IBD means I suffer with exhaustion/fatigue and it’s vital I get the 8 hours even with my ten years less than you. I’m also with you on the fact we use exercise as a crux to cope with low self esteem, if I found myself unable to ride for whatever reason I wouldn’t cope at all and I know I get obsessive over stuff. Even with my ten years less I’m trying to come to terms with riding less gnar stuff after the wrist break just because I feel like with my back issue I’m on the cusp of injuring myself and not being able to ride vs being able to ride. I TOTALLY agree with the weight you carry on your back for every ride comment though but I know why you do but I’m not sure it helps as is putting your body under more than necessary load.

    Not sure I can advise on how to cope but you can always send me a message if you’re struggling and just need a sounding board.

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    would it not be worth your while investing some time with a counsellor?

    Yep, did this. The second one did produce some useful stuff, but not to the degree that I need. Not sure where to take it…

    I think I would really struggle mentally without them. I just need to figure out what my body can still do and how to keep enjoying the great outdoors without breaking myself.

    Agreed

    All my cycling goals are “having fun” related.

    Very positive. Mine rarely are/were. Even some of the excellent fun rides I’ve had ( eg 4 passes with GolfChick) had an element of challenge/ potential suffering which appealed to me as much.
    I can just imagine GC sat at her desk going ” so that’s why you dragged me up that screeslope hike a bike from hell on Fairfield you twisted ****”
    😝

    I have a rough goal in mind when I mountain bike in terms of what a”ride” is. It’s about 30km and about 1000m of ascent. But other than that I ride to put a smile on my face. On the weekend I did just shy of both of those, but – and this is the crucial bit. I had a heap of fun

    Yep, and I’ve been trying to do that much more. I was discussing with continuity last month how much fun our recent rides were because we binned the torturefest aspirations at the start and just rode around having fun. And I made no effort whatsoever to try to keep up with him on the hills, which was sooooo much more relaxing.

    I TOTALLY agree with the weight you carry on your back for every ride comment … body under more than necessary load.

    TBF I’m getting much better at this. You and Conti are right that I did have the kitchen sink with me on our first few rides, as you say for a specific reason. I do still carry a lot on some solo rides, probably to try to offset the additional risk that I am placing myself under by being there, alone. Like this one, on the Carneddau
    PXL_20220107_131403498

    But nowadays if I’m cycling with someone I know then the rucksack is largely empty.

    BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    I have a real problem going out for a short ride. I think whether it’ll involve a decent distance 60km or 1,500m minimum or some especially interesting/ techie sections…. if it doesn’t then I just CBA. I have this stupid idea that if a ride isn’t utterly amazeballs then there’s no point. And if i do plan something then I just don’t sleep the night before and am a mess.

    At the risk of stating the obvious, it doesn’t seem to be making you very happy and maybe you need to ask yourself some questions about what you’re trying to prove and to who. I don’t mean that negatively, just that you seem to be so invested in ‘challenges’ that it’s actually stopping them being enjoyable, though I guess it’s a question of whether it’s apprehension or excitement that’s hitting your sleep.

    Maybe you could reframe what you’re doing in a way that makes it less of a black and white, binary, succeed or fail proposition?

    That’s easy to say, of course, but less maybe straightforward to do, depends what’s at the root of it I guess, which is where counselling of some sort might help. Sometimes this stuff’s really obvious, I went through a phase of being stupidly and needlessly competitive on a bike and in the end it came down to me just realising that I didn’t have to prove I was fast to anyone – unless I was racing of course, when I was mostly proving that I wasn’t particularly fast at all.

    Come for a ride and a chat some time. We can look at lichen and appreciate the joys of mindful cycling 😉

    jam-bo
    Full Member

    I have a real problem going out for a short ride. I think whether it’ll involve a decent distance 60km or 1,500m minimum or some especially interesting/ techie sections…. if it doesn’t then I just CBA. I have this stupid idea that if a ride isn’t utterly amazeballs then there’s no point. And if i do plan something then I just don’t sleep the night before and am a mess.

    I’m almost the exact opposite. most rides are an hour, maybe 90 mins, sometimes less. Its rare I ride for more than two hours. I often don’t decide where I’m going until I’m rolling down the road from my house.

    go average, go often

    singlespeedstu
    Full Member

    Sounds like you need to try and redescover the joys of just pissing about on a bike.

    It’s all a bit pointless anyway so you may as well just go and have fun.

    I’ll often go out for an hour and just mess about on one or two trails.
    No structure, totally pointless but good fun.

    I used to race Moto Enduro at Euro and World levels and now have much more fun just pissing about on a pushbike because I don’t have to train or plan anything.
    Just jump on the bike and head out for a quick rip or longer if the mood takes me.
    It shouldn’t be causing you stress just planning a ride.

    n0b0dy0ftheg0at
    Free Member

    The last time I didn’t get on a bike all day was 1st Nov ’21, but a lot of days have been approx 45-60mins. I’ve still got a number of local-ish hills I want to climb for the first time this year before mid November, I did one of them on Monday, but I’m so out of practice of 40+ mile / 3+ hour rides this year that I’m filled with doubt about even attempting them. I used to do a 100Km+ ride most months, I’ve done three since ’21.

    mrlebowski
    Full Member

    I found switching to XC & away from endurance (racing) helpful. It means my sessions on the whole are shorter & more intense. Yes, I still need to do some 3-4hr z2 rides but I just tend to hit the local towpath & zone out. But my MTB rides are more around creating a race like vibe i.e. a 90min hard blat. Seems to be working well..

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    I have a real problem going out for a short ride. I think whether it’ll involve a decent distance 60km or 1,500m minimum or some especially interesting/ techie sections…. if it doesn’t then I just CBA

    I recognise some of this in myself. When Covid “lockdown” was in place though I was happy to get out for a ride of any length/duration, and then the 100 day challenge thing have been quite good at getting me out for shorter rides too – often when the weather hasn’t really been that great but I needed to get in my 30 minutes. In both cases I took to exploring little bits of trail I’d otherwise have bypassed when I was in a rush to get that longer ride done. I found new stuff and some of that is now incorporated in my longer rides. Just another thing to think about/divert your attention maybe?

    therevokid
    Free Member

    59 (nearly 60) and had to stop all the “fun” riding epic mtb, audxing, long solo bike packing due to heart condition now that’s fixed it’s all down to real fun and putting a smile back. I still can’t climb for toffee and the longest ride currently is 50km (on an e-bike) but it’s a start.

    I keep thinking of Eddy Merckx’s quote …. “Ride as much or as little, or as long or as short as you feel. But ride.”
    Gets me past all the meds I have to take and the total lack of any form of legs that I don’t have anymore but I get out and I hear the birds and smile … 🙂

    stevextc
    Free Member

    Yes, I’m a complete mess. Have quite a lot of self loathing and a history of using exercide/ ticks/ challenges as a crutch for my low self esteem.

    So back in the 80’s sometime I met Mr. Fisher of Fisher-Price toys… he had an old lurcher he had to lift over stiles and we walked together from somewhere outside Thirlmere to Old Dungeon Gill, possibly Honister it’s a long time ago.

    He was in his 70-80’s ?? (looked like pics of God in kids bibles) but he’d obviously been much fitter yet he was out enjoying life still and walking a distance 90% of the population wouldn’t do.

    That’s when I decided to be like him when I was older…

    I’m just not able to cycle at anything the level I used to, or for the length of time, or as often.

    and I’m sure Mr Fisher wasn’t either … (translate to climb, run, walk) yet I tell myself “be like Mr Fisher”

    and ….

    Scotroutes

    These are not all the same thing. You just need to weigh up intensity vs duration and decide which is more important to you.

    or mix and match …. it’s the old pick and 2…

    I can’t not exercise or both my body and mind fall apart quite quickly… (auto immune issues get worse)
    I can’t do full on every day so I do a bit most days and a bit of higher intensity stuff or do 2 group rides in a day hopefully once a week.

    I’m not as bad now but I recall going to Gisburn and doing a lap in semi winter, it was shit, so I did another one, and another one, and I think a fourth. Which was just as shit as the third one, just slower.

    Sounds like you were riding alone and not for fun?

    Why not start to try and reframe fitness as a means to and end or better still something that just happens as a consequence of going out and having fun?

    I’m the oldest of my current riding buddies (with the exception of one who’s out with his back), most are in their 40’s and I’m first up and down (or thereabouts). Sometimes I’ll do 2 group rides in a day… or Wednesday a young riding buddy had a shit couple of days at work so I loaned them the eBike and totally hammered it round and got a proper workout and enjoyed it at the same time. Couldn’t even tell you how far or climbing as I’m not interested enough to ask her… (she was recording but I’m not really fussed I got a good workout and a nice ride with a friend)

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