Exciting radiator bleeding question

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  • Exciting radiator bleeding question
  • mogrim
    Member

    Upstairs radiators are a bit colder than they ought to be, I’m guessing they need bleeding… I’m completely ignorant of the subject, so stupid questions coming up:

    a) Do you need to do each radiator separately? (I assume you do)

    b) How do I bleed this radiator:

    Just undo the screw a bit with the heating off, or is there some dark art to radiator manipulation I’m not aware of? There’s a little bit under the screw that sticks out, what’s that for?

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    here’s a little bit under the screw that sticks out, what’s that for?

    it’s where the air/water will come out (I assume it’s a tube)

    Ro5ey
    Member

    I find bleeding a rad strangely satisfying … yes you do each separately and you may find one much worse than the others.

    Sorry I can’t see your pics, so I’m not of much help.

    But I do mine with the heating on… so that you can feel the warmth rise up the rad… Mmmmm… weirdo 😆

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    be careful bleedign open systems with the heating on – you can end up just sucking more air in to the system.

    LapSteel
    Member

    I was told by my plumber always to bleed when cold…..were on an old fashioned boiler not a combi

    Ro5ey
    Member

    No… don’t take that fun away from me.

    My life just got even more sad.

    mogrim
    Member

    it’s where the air/water will come out (I assume it’s a tube)

    Could be, although I’m sure I looked at it and it didn’t have a hole running down the middle…

    Will try later with the radiator in the bathroom, tiled floor you see 🙂

    globalti
    Member

    It won’t be air it will be hydrogen, the by-product from your radiators rusting inside. If there’s a lot you need to put some more antioxidant in the system, it’s called Fernox.

    If it’s a combi boiler releasing pressure from the rads will cause a drop in pressure in the system, which you will need to replace with the filling loop under the boiler. If it’s a traditional open vented system replacement water will flow down from the header tank, which is a good opportunity to tip in some Fernox.

    Premier Icon ffej
    Subscriber

    mogrim

    If you have a combi boiler then after you’ve bled them you may have to recharge / repressure the boiler. This usually isn’t hard and is just a case of opening a valve or two on the boiler for a min and watching the pressure increase on a gauge, however find out how to do this BEFORE you bleed the rads as if it drops down too low the heating won’t kick in.

    Jeff

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    I was told by the plumber earlier this week,

    a) always do it with the heating switched off, and

    b) start with the lowest and work up.

    Taff
    Member

    Agree with what Cougar said, I also go told to do it in sequence which is fine if you know it!

    mogrim
    Member

    If you have a combi boiler then after you’ve bled them you may have to recharge / repressure the boiler. This usually isn’t hard and is just a case of opening a valve or two on the boiler for a min and watching the pressure increase on a gauge, however find out how to do this BEFORE you bleed the rads as if it drops down too low the heating won’t kick in

    Done that bit before, that’s about the extent of my knowledge of the plumbing in my house 🙂

    Cheers for the suggestions, will try and workout which is likely to be the lowest radiator first!

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