Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 72 total)
  • Ethical bike brands – does the NRA association make you rethink your purchases
  • Premier Icon poly
    Free Member

    I noticed this article:

    Dropped From The Range: major retailers join boycott of bike brands for NRA connections

    and it made me wonder whether the typical STWer was likely to let the NRA link in the US to these brands affect purchasing decisions in the UK?  Apparently Bell, Giro and Camelback are amongst brands owned by a group which supports the NRA (as they also produce firearms).

    I don’t normally consider myself to be a particularly ethical/polical motivated consumer (I happily use Amazon and i’ve been known to visit Starbucks*) but this would certainly give me pause for thought.

    *although its not my favourite coffee vendor I’m inherently lazy and won’t walk too far to find somewhere else.

    Premier Icon steel4real
    Free Member

    NO – don’t give a flying F.

    Lets see all the hand wringing Guardian readers burn their Camelbaks and Gyro helmets first shall we ?

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    No, I really couldn’t give a toss tbh, if we drilled down into every business on the planet I’m sure we’d find something that we would find morally or ethically questionable.

    Premier Icon leffeboy
    Full Member

    In a world where politics seems to be out of control your purchases are the new voting so why would you not

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Full Member

    Lets see all the hand wringing Guardian readers burn their Camelbaks and Gyro helmets first shall we ?

    Wouldn’t that fuel global warming though? Think things through before you post in future please.

    Premier Icon P-Jay
    Full Member

    It’s already been covered here:

    https://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/camelbak-giro-blackburn-bell-assault-rifles-and-the-nra/

    But in short, yes, I don’t knowingly buy from companies or groups you support the NRA or make Assault Weapons or Handguns for the civilian market.

    I’m not alone and it’s finally starting to gain some traction in the US>

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    Lets see all the hand wringing Guardian readers burn their Camelbaks and Gyro helmets first shall we ?

    Nice knee-jerking there. If people feel uneasy about the money they spend potentially going – even in a very small way – to finance the NRA, why shouldn’t they choose not to buy those brands?

    Burning stuff you’ve already bought isn’t going to achieve anything. Nice straw man…

    There was a recent Cycling Tips podcast where the hosts pontificated about how boycotting those brands would simply damage them without having an impact on the parent company and potentially damage the livelihood of people – ergo their mates – who work for them.

    What they didn’t address was that some people simply don’t want to give money to a company owned by an arms outift which supports the NRA. Is there something wrong with choosing not to give money to companies who finance in some small way, an organisation you disapprove of?

    Premier Icon tazzymtb
    Full Member

    Yes, all of our choices in life will have an impact on others, but to willingly put money into organisations that fund the NRA lobby is a morally bullshit as buying goods from Israel occupies territories, or supporting companies that you know use child labor. I’m about as far from a hand wringing, guardian reading “snowflake” as you can get but I do believe in not being a ****

    Premier Icon oldtalent
    Free Member

    Doesn’t even register as an issue. However I’m far from the leftie professionally offended typical stw reader.

    Premier Icon larrydavid
    Free Member

    I wont be buying any of these companies products until the link is broken as a personal choice. This is made easy by the range and choice in the market – it would be much harder say if Giro were the only make of helmets you could buy.

    But, I think expressing moral values through consumer choices and going on about it is a weak form of politics. It’s too easy to ‘boycott’ one thing, replace it with another and experience no sacrifice and no risk. It’s too often the politics of self satisfaction – and a replacement for real politics. Real political progress happens when people put their neck on the line – by standing up and speaking (risk of ridicule) or by taking part in something challenging, risky or difficult (e.g. strike action).

    Premier Icon CaptainFlashheart
    Free Member

    Boeing make attack helicopters and bombs. I don’t see anyone boycotting the 737 for their city break.

    Premier Icon christhetall
    Free Member

    Yes

    Purchase power is far more effective than voting

    And yes, I am a guardian reading, bleeding heart vegetarian tree-hugger !

    Premier Icon thered
    Full Member

    If this was a global issue then I would but it’s an Ameriocan issue and they have had plenty of opportunities to fix it themselves.

    Boycotting the brands associated with the NRA will have no effect, change will only come when the gun atrocities reach a critical mass. We are still a long way from that critical mass I’m afraid cos they are to a degree an abhorrent society.

    Premier Icon larrydavid
    Free Member

    Boeing make attack helicopters and bombs. I don’t see anyone boycotting the 737 for their city break.

    That’s the point I was trying to make but you put it better.

    Also, people would never go to Tel Aviv or buy olive oil from Israel because it would be supporting the Israeli economy. But buying an iPhone or visiting the USA – with it’s excellent record of not starting wars… no problem.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Free Member

    Purchase power is far more effective than voting

    There was an incredibly effective campaign to move ban accounts from a bank who was backing a very controversial development in Tasmania, it worked, they pulled out of it and other banks wouldn’t touch them. Your wallet and your choices, when the problems with gender and bathrooms was becoming a bigger issue in the US people like the superbowl and Disney simply had the power to move away from those places who were being discriminatory.

    Premier Icon P-Jay
    Full Member

    Boeing make attack helicopters and bombs. I don’t see anyone boycotting the 737 for their city break.

    But do they sell them to teenagers?

    You can let your cynicism run wild if you like, is it worth believing in anything if you don’t know with absolute certainty that it will fix all that’s wrong with the world immediately?

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    Boeing make attack helicopters and bombs. I don’t see anyone boycotting the 737 for their city break.

    Well, if there was another airliner manufacturer that didn’t have a military wing, you could chose airlines based on that, but I think even Airbus has a military arm to it’s business, so what would you propose? Stay-cations?

    But these things aren’t absolutes are they? knowing that some manufacturers are linked to companies that fund the NRA, you are free to make decisions about whether to buy from them or not, it’s pretty much down to individual morals/ethics. Individual purchases aren’t going to be significant, but enough folk decide to choose “something else”…maybe

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    Boycotting the brands associated with the NRA will have no effect, change will only come when the gun atrocities reach a critical mass. We are still a long way from that critical mass I’m afraid cos they are to a degree an abhorrent society.

    That may be the case, but if people want to make a personal choice not to give money to brands that are owned by  companies who support the NRA, then that’s fair enough. You can do it on the basis of your own conscience if you choose to. There’s no requirement that you think it will change American society.

    Premier Icon yoshimi
    Full Member

    Gaining traction tho – REI are fairly high profile……

    Outdoor retailers REI and Canada-based Mountain Equipment Co-Op both announced that they would no longer carry any of the 50 brands produced by Vista. Both companies are co-ops; REI made the decision to break with Vista after thousands of its members (more than 24,000 as of this writing) called for it in an online petition, and Mountain Equipment cited a massive number of calls from its own members.

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Full Member

    Boeing make attack helicopters and bombs. I don’t see anyone boycotting the 737 for their city break.

    I’m sure people do, you’re probably just not looking hard enough.

    Plenty of us have stopped or drastically cut back on flying for ethical reasons anyway.

    Why do you want everyone to be as conformist and conservative as yourself? Would it make you feel better?

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Full Member

    Boycotts and consumer activism are all about achievable goals anyway.

    There’s evidence the Vista campaign is having an impact already in Antony’s story over there —->

    Premier Icon jameso
    Full Member

    Boycotting the brands associated with the NRA will have no effect, change will only come when the gun atrocities reach a critical mass.

    It’s not at critical mass already?

    Premier Icon zinaru
    Free Member

    I think its great that businesses are at long last standing up to the NRA. anything to challenge them surely has to be a good thing in my eyes.

    And yes, like one or two others on this thread, I’m a tree-hugging veggie. I’m well, use to basing my purchases on avoiding animal testing policies and things I generally disagree with in my tiny blinkered world view!

    Premier Icon hb70
    Full Member

    This

    “Lets see all the hand wringing Guardian readers burn their Camelbaks and Gyro helmets first shall we?”

    And this

    “I’m about as far from a hand wringing, guardian reading “snowflake” as you can get but I do believe in not being a ****”

    Its about not being a ****.

    Premier Icon jivehoneyjive
    Free Member

    It’s great that these links are being put under the spotlight; the only way anything has ever changed is through scrutiny and pressure.

    By the same merit, I stopped renewing my British Cycling membership due to HSBC’s involvement.

    The NRA is grim enough, but HSBC takes it to a whole other level…

    From corruption at the highest levels in the City of London and the Crown’s Offshore network, to gun running, drug trafficking and indiscriminate slaughter on a wholesale scale.

    Not to mention their role in the surveillance state…

    Of course, change takes time, but there’s certainly a lot more awareness these days, even compared to 4 or 5 years ago.

    Premier Icon edhornby
    Full Member

    I was about to buy a giro helmet but haven’t now – I know that it hurts the retailer that can’t shift stock if it’s not Sale or Return, but If it is and they return it, the message will start to get through

    I know that there comes a time where you end up buying something from someone unethical but if you can choose then why would you knowingly fund a bunch of &@$tards?

    Premier Icon edd
    Full Member

    I’ve just bought a new Giro helmet (I was aware of the boycott but chose to ignore it).

    Awaits flaming…

    Premier Icon mindmap3
    Free Member

    Not really – I don’t want to support the NRA because their hold on politicions and lobbying agaisnt gun control debates is pretty low given what happens reguarly in America but I’m unlikelt to buy their products anyway due to preferring others (e.g. Evoc packs).

    Part of me can’t help feeling that if those in power don’t care about mass shootings, or many Americans judging by comments on this story, why the hell should I?

    Premier Icon vincienup
    Full Member

    Yep, agree that the NRA aren’t directly my problem but they’re an anti-democratic organisation causing human misery.  Every little helps, and people are people. I pay attention to consumer ethics so ignoring the link now made would be hypocritical.

    I’m not going to destroy existing purchases as that would be pointless, but I’m not going to support the companies involved until they mend their ways.

    of course, it helps that none of the involved have particularly stand-out irreplaceable  products anymore, regardless of how innovative they may have been in the past – there are alternative products that are just as Good or better, so it’s hardly like I’m making a hair shirt for myself…

    Premier Icon PJM1974
    Free Member

    This topic has sent Singletrack social media into meltdown, I had no idea that we had hundreds of American readers who are so upset that they’re cancelling their subscriptions (some have cancelled their subscriptions twice, the same people were complaining when it last popped up on Facebook.

    The reality of the situation is that the relationship between brands is somewhat opaque – for example if you buy fine craft ale at a fiver a pint, you may or may not be inadvertently filling the coffers of a large multinational alcohol brand and the same is true here.

    FWIW, I’m going to play Forum Bingo and will be looking for the terms “libtards”, “virtue signalling”, “NRA promotes responsible gun ownership” and “but the Second Amendment…”.

    That’s me done, I’m off to enjoy a craft ale but will be back to check on bingo progress later.

    Premier Icon 2tyred
    Full Member

    Yes, which is annoying because I really get on with Giro shoes and was about to buy a new pair of Empires for summer road riding.

    New information has come to light which affects my choice. I recognise that the power in my wallet exceeds the power of my vote. Don’t like it, but that’s the way of the world.

    I’m not about to destroy my existing Giro products – that money’s been spent (regrettably in hindsight) so that would be futile and wasteful.

    I disike this notion that larrydavid and Flashy posit above – essentially, if you can’t be certain you do everything, don’t do anything. I realise there’s fun to be had in playing devil’s advocate and sniffing out hypocrisy or inconsistency, but that’s playground stuff at best, lazy and snide at worst.

    It’s okay to admit you weren’t aware of something and change your position once you are.

    Premier Icon kayla1
    Free Member

    Yes, it’ll make me look somewhere else when I need to replace my Bell lid. I try to buy ‘ethically’ (and locally/indie as well) if possible and this is just another one I have to be aware of. Tree hugging veggies here, OH knits his own yoghurt and everything.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    good post 2tyred.

    Premier Icon jamj1974
    Full Member

    NO – don’t give a flying F.

    Lets see all the hand wringing Guardian readers burn their Camelbaks and Gyro helmets first shall we ?

    Ah… So early in the thread and we have a self-appointed ‘snowflake assassin’.

    Good thing assault weapons are banned in the UK, every slightly lefty thread would be shot to pieces by an AR15.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Full Member

    Luckily there are alternatives to Giro and Bell helmets these days. A few years back, you’d have struggled to find a decent helmet not made by one of them – I had about 5 Giros in a row, before switching brands recently. Same with Camelbaks I suppose. So it’s not a difficult boycott to join.

    Or you could buy them 2nd hand so the co’s have already got the money for their rifle businesses.

    Premier Icon dissonance
    Full Member

    Lets see all the hand wringing Guardian readers burn their Camelbaks and Gyro helmets first shall we ?

    Why would anyone burn something they have already purchased. Seems a bit odd as opposed to not buying anything new from that provider.

    Might have made a bit more sense if you said return their Camelbaks but I guess some people just default to wanting to burn anything they disapprove of.

    Premier Icon tpbiker
    Free Member

    Won’t affect my decision one bit. As had been stated already, dig deep enough and you will end up morally questioning most things you buy.

    I don’t agree with the prevalence of guns in the US, but its pretty low down on my ‘give a shit meter’ compared to most of the bad things that go on in the world.. Many of which could probably  be linked back to my purchasing habits in some shape or from .

    Premier Icon mattsccm
    Free Member

    Edited. This post should be chat and I shouldn’t be posting.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Free Member

    I feel that we have no moral right to whinge about another countries way of doing things.

    In this case it’s more deciding on if want to fund something or not.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 72 total)

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