Engineering term (female)

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  • Engineering term (female)
  • Rscott
    Member

    Why in engineering terms are machines, boats, cars, bridges etc refereed to as female.

    Because they have most gussets and flanges.

    stevewhyte
    Member

    Because you mostly ride on or in them, and as such most men would rather ride a female than male.

    Because it’s mostly blokes that work on them, built them or own them, combined with what stevewhyte said above (sorry about the massive generalisation). Now, to give the other view, my sister has called her classic Mini ‘Berty’, a blokes name.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Subscriber

    Boats because they often had a female figurehead…

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Affection.

    higgo
    Member

    Because, ultimately, they will all let you down.

    maxtorque
    Member

    Because they work, then without warning, they stop working for no good reason what so ever…………. 😉

    (and it’s generally a mans fault too)

    (There, that’s done my bit for feminism)

    Because they work, then without warning, they stop working for no good reason what so ever………….

    (and it’s generally a mans fault too)

    (There, that’s done my bit for feminism)

    I see what you did there

    dribbling
    Member

    I still enjoy a secret snigger that female connectors have the opening that the male bits slides into.

    Premier Icon althepal
    Subscriber

    I believe the russians are the opposite- refer to them as males? Maybe?

    I don’t know if it’s the same for heavy machinery but boats were traditionally named after the captain/owners wife or significant other due to the dangers involved. If you were sailing any sort of distance, possibly to a warzone, engaging the enemy and then back again the odds were not stacked in your favour. It was an attachment to home and they all believed very strongly in forming a bond with the ship. It also served to stave off bad luck and is generally a symbol of affection.

    Having said that many captains actually named their boat after their mother, not their wife. Earlier than this, English boats were always named after goddesses in the belief that they would be protected by said goddesses spirit.

    The Mary Rose for example, built for Henry the 8th – her name comes from Henry’s sister, Mary combined with the red rose of the house of tudor.

    I believe the tradition of ships always having a female name stopped when all warships gained the prefix of HMS. The key part there being that they were ALL tributes to her majesty, and therefore they need not be given female names. I.e. HMS Victory.

    It’s ironic really because women were never allowed on any sort of ship until superstitions changed. In history they were considered to be the source of bad luck when on board a ship although this was possibly just a rouse started by the Navy to stop men sneaking women on board which inevitably lead to cases of rape, fights between men, mutiny etc.

    Premier Icon totalshell
    Subscriber

    in english we dont have ‘rules’ as to the sex of the inanimate .. however the snail munchers do and just about all the above are female..

    Premier Icon firestarter
    Subscriber

    Our belts in the army had a male and female end on and the way to remember which way round it went was remembering the male is always right 😉

    Premier Icon coolhandluke
    Subscriber

    “Put some hair around it” was always the quip made when someone watching someone having trouble putting a thing into another thing. Eg male / female connector, a bolt into a hole etc.

    Oh how we all laughed.

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