Electric car users…

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  • Electric car users…
  • Premier Icon robbo1234biking
    Subscriber

    Looking for some real world experience of electric cars. Have an opportunity to replace the wife’s car with a VW eGolf for less than the current monthly cost of her PCP. The PCP comes to an end soon and this looks like the best replacement option.

    It will be used for school run and commuting and any trips we do locally at the weekend. We will still have my car for longer trips and holidays etc. Can get a charger installed for the house and the overnight tariff comes in pretty good at about 1pm’s per mile.

    Any real world experience and pros/cons. Still a little concerned about range and issues with recharging in the go although I think that will not be a major issue as we don’t often do 100 miles without returning home!

    Premier Icon littledave
    Subscriber

    I have been running a Renault Zoe for almost 12 months and love it.
    EVs are very easy to drive.

    I get more than 150 miles range which is more than enough.

    Charging away from home seems to vary depending on where you live. I am in Scotland where most chargers are on one network, very easy. I believe that the situation elsewhere in the UK is more complex.

    Go for it and enjoy.

    Premier Icon maxtorque
    Subscriber

    If you have somewhere to park with easy access to a power socket (or installed charger) then do it.

    You have nothing to loose, and everything to gain!

    (4 years with an i3 here 😉

    Premier Icon robbo1234biking
    Subscriber

    Car will be parked on the drive which runs along the side of the house where the plug in point will be installed so very easy to charge overnight. No issues there.

    Premier Icon rone
    Subscriber

    All good here. Kia Soul.

    Range drops in Winter.

    Nice to drive etc. Going on to EDFs cheaper evening and weekend tariff very soon.

    Premier Icon bikebouy
    Subscriber

    Looking for some real world experience of electric cars. Have an opportunity to replace the wife’s car with a VW eGolf for less than the current monthly cost of her PCP. The PCP comes to an end soon and this looks like the best replacement option.

    The eGolf is a good solution, but it’s being replaced next year with the ID.. and it’ll be a far better vehicle than the eGolf… by a looooong way.

    I’d (ID) wait until thats released.

    IMO, obvz.

    Premier Icon winston
    Subscriber

    3 years with a basic 24kwh leaf here. Good car but range is awful – however its only a second car and even though it has a useful range of 70 miles it does 95% of what I need it for.

    Pros: Cheap, reliable (so far), lovely to drive, bigger than it looks.

    Cons: Range is gash, Nissan build quality and design, no towbar option

    parkesie
    Member

    We have a 24kwh leaf charge it to 80% over night 1 or 2 times a week . Gives 65 miles range drops abit in winter 4 miles lost to running the heater. Costs 2-3p per mile on house electricity and we sometimes park and charge for free. Only just costs more than cycling to work.

    Edukator
    Member

    I’ve been driving a Zoé 40 for two and a half years. I’ve just ordered the new fast charge Zoé 50. Delightful cars. There’s a real WTF moment when you get back in a normal car.

    Range depends on driving style. Even with a 50kW charger there’s not much point going faster than the trucks on the motorway because the time you save going faster you spend charging. Since we’ve owned the 41kWh Zoé we’ve averaged 12.5kW/100km which give an average range of 328km (you’d be daft to use the last 30km unless you are certain the next charge point is working). The 395km claimed for the 52kWh car is entirely plausible. This is in small town France, you won’t get the same on British roads. In Winter we’ve been down to 250km and driving as fast as legal on an autoroute limited at 110/130 just to see what happened flattened the battery in 130km.

    The first year of ownership the charge points were so far apart we had to plan routes carefully but there are more charge points than petrol stations around here now (Mobive if you visit France).

    Premier Icon robbo1234biking
    Subscriber

    I am aware the ID is coming out but looking at £200 a month all in (servicing, tyres etc). Will be a company car but from april 0% bik.

    Premier Icon Clover
    Subscriber

    I am not a car lover but I have a soft spot for my Tesla Model 3. It has a towbar so will carry bikes and seems desperate to please. It’s stupidly fast, tells you where and when you will need to charge before you start long trips and we’ve not needed significantly longer to do them (bought it and drove straight to the Alsace from Yorkshire). Super comfy both as driver and passenger. Tesla seem to have worked out how to make EV ownership intuitive. I’ve tried a few other brand chargers and they will work but there seems to be quite a bit of faff involved. This will, no doubt, improve in time. Go for it, it changes how you think about travel and that’s good.

    Premier Icon devbrix
    Subscriber

    I’ve just ordered the new fast charge Zoé 50

    edukator didn’t know they were taking orders, been waiting for the local dealer to start taking them. Have you a delivery date?

    stevious
    Member

    Leaf owner for a couple of years now. We fight over who gets to drive it, and sitting in a petrol car now just feels like a step in the wrong direction.

    Longer journeys can be a bit trickier, but day-to-day stuff is grand.

    If you have a look at Zap Map for your area you’ll get an idea of where the public charging is (and which network mgiht be most useful).

    FunkyDunc
    Member

    I looked at the eGolf and thought it was underpowered for what I need ie my commute is 40 miles a day at 60mph

    If you are just pootling around town it will be a very nice place to be and a joy to drive compared with a combustion engine.

    Charging isn’t an issue just do it every night at home, but it does literally have to be a local journey car. IMO the infrastructure isn’t there yet to do weekends away etc

    Premier Icon sas78
    Subscriber

    24kw leaf lover here. My wife does 27 miles a day commute, she charges every second day but could do three days. We find the range is fine been a few trips from Edinburgh to Carlisle in it. Once you know where to charge it’s a doddle to live with. It’s our second car because we have a dog and two kids. Love driving it generally but in a city it’s a real pleasure.

    I’d love an electric estate next with realistic 120mile range. That would be our perfect car.

    We have two leafs at work. Love them.

    Bogging design the original, but looks ain’t everything!

    Premier Icon sas78
    Subscriber

    OP. Your range anxiety is normal but once you get in the mindset of an electric car and running the battery down where with a petrol you’d fill it at half then you’ll be a convert. My friend got an EGolf. He loves it.

    The driving style is the big challenge. To get anywhere near the range they tell you, you need to be driving smoothly. I reckon everyone should have a lesson in an electric car, the regen braking is a great thing for teaching you about fuel conservation generally. I think you drive your petrol cars smoother having driven electric. Do it.

    Edukator
    Member

    27/01/2020, devbrix. Without fast charge it would have been earlier.

    Premier Icon mos
    Subscriber

    Just a question, why haven’t manufacturers standardised on a particular plug system yet? The number of points on the Zapmap impressed me at first, then a noticed all the different charger types. Madness.

    drlex
    Member

    As it’s not been mentioned so far, and it’s getting to that time of year, enjoy a pre-heated car (if you set off at regular times).

    Edukator
    Member

    They have, mos. It’s Euro Combo from now on in theory. In France at least that will work with just about every public charge point except a few old ones in Charante and Alsace. It’s compatible with Type 2 which has dominated up till now.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Yup Type 2 is king pretty much all manufactures use them.

    Premier Icon FB-ATB
    Subscriber

    Watch out for pedestrians stepping out because they don’t look. I’ve had a few close calls.

    willow1212
    Member

    Do it. Absolutely.
    We’re in a similar boat, we have a petrol estate car which we still use for longer journeys and holidays etc, and bought a used Soul EV about a year ago. I use the EV for commuting and it is always the first car we take for local journeys at weekend etc.

    I think I’ve used public charging points about three times when I have done a couple of longer round trips, they are pretty straightforward if you plan ahead and look up the available charging points before hand. Overall compared to visiting a petrol station every week or two it is way less hassle than my diesel was before.

    Tax is obviously zero, my “major” service this year cost £99 at a Kia dealer, which included a brake fluid change, wash and vac, and a big software update including adding Apple Carplay and Android Auto.

    As above pre-heating in winter is brilliant.

    And besides the costs and environmental upsides, they are just so much easier/more relaxing to drive, once you’ve lived with one especially with a home charger, anything diesel/petrol just seems really primitive with all that wasted noise and heat, all those moving parts and having to visit a special shop to fill it up.

    Edukator
    Member

    At least the special shop takes a cresdit card. The card and app system is annoying and a rip off. A trip accross Spain, France and Germany requires mulltiple cards and apps which very often involve a monthly charge even if they’re not used. How would petrol car drivers react if to use a particular brand of petrol you had to pay an annual fee of 38e? Needs sorting… .

    I had a i3s for the weekend and absolutely loved it. I was also concerned about range but soon realised what it offered covered pretty much all of my day to day driving. For various reasons I didn’t end up pulling the trigger but having checked the price through work last week after hearing about the 0% BIK tax and that brings the price down to no brainer levels so will be ordering.

    willow1212
    Member

    Yes Edukator, going touring round Europe in one right now would be a bit of a pain in the backside. But it doesn’t sound like that is what the OP is planning, for what he wants that just won’t be an issue.
    (And in time it will get better and more charging points will just use contactless credit/debit cards, but that will take time.)

    Premier Icon simon_g
    Subscriber

    I have an eGolf on the way in January too after 2 years in a Golf GTE, but I’ve had brief stints in other EVs. Yes the ID3 is coming but the eGolf will be a current model well into next year – it’s still being made in a different factory (Dresden) to the regular Golf and the ID3. The deals on them (cut list price and finance incentives) make it way cheaper than ID3 or even a 40kwh Leaf.

    Sounds ideal for you, can charge at home, rarely need to do more than 100 miles.

    I tend not to think about range anxiety (“will I get there?”) but time anxiety (“will it take a bit longer to get there?”). There’s plenty of rapid charging particularly if you’re willing to get off the motorway, more a question of if a unit might be broken or occupied. But you just allow enough contingency to push on to the next if you can’t charge at your first choice place. I’m planning to use mine for the couple of trips a year to BPW (210-ish miles each way), will just allow an extra couple of hours and take my time.

    mariner
    Member

    Not really off topic – could Renault Zoe owners explain the battery rental costs to me please.
    My local Renault garage is not ‘electric qualified (wtf?) so cant help me and its a long drive to another.
    From what I can work out it depends on your monthly mileage. So are you renting the battery or just paying a battery tax?

    Premier Icon iainc
    Subscriber

    I have just had a play on the Tesla webpage. A model 3, with towbar and long range 4wd options, so over 300 mile range, would be cheaper PCP than my current A6 avant….. hmm, food for thought…

    Premier Icon simon_g
    Subscriber

    Zoe battery rates are here: https://www.renault.co.uk/renault-finance/battery-hire.html

    You own or finance the car separately, and make a battery hire payment each month. There are bands for mileage but at 8p a mile that’s £120 for each extra 1500 miles so exactly the same as moving up a band – I’d just go for the least and put the rest aside for later. They’re meant to true up every few years but seem lax on it. If you sell privately you make the new owner take out a new agreement and yours ends so it would get totted up then. Renault dealers have some special arrangement to take them over when they come into used stock.

    Note there are battery owned Zoes (that have the “i” designation) too, but they’re rarer. The new ZE50 Zoe will be battery owned only in the UK.

    Been using a Tesla model S since early 2018. Brilliant for long journeys (regular trips to and from Cambridge, or visits to London, Southampton, …). And no problem at all for local commuting. My SO used it for their community-based job for several months. At about 30 miles per day it got plugged in on a Friday night before weekend driving and then plugged in Sunday night all ready for a week’s commuting.

    my SO took delivery of a Model 3 in September. It is a more practical size for day-to-day work. I still owe the Model 3 thread on the forum a summary of differences.

    In short, I have no hesitation recommending a move to a Model 3.

    Depending on your driving I’ve no hesitation in saying ‘go electric’. If your daily drive is within 90% of the rated range of the car at 90% ‘full’ then any electric that meets those criteria will work for you if you can charge at home overnight.

    Premier Icon robbo1234biking
    Subscriber

    Nearly a consensus from STW! Will go and have a look at one over the weekend but think we will likely go for it. Had a golf a few years ago and really liked it so looking forward to getting another one.

    Premier Icon phiiiiil
    Subscriber

    Curiously in the two and a bit years we’ve had our Zoe we’ve never been particularly close to running out of battery but we have nearly been close to running out of petrol in the other car because we both now so dislike the faff, expense, time and smelliness of having to take it to a petrol station…

    DT78
    Member

    Dumb question from non owner – how long are the charging cables? When our diesal dies I think we will move to EV. Trying to work out if I can put the charge point somewhere less visible than next to the door.

    B.A.Nana
    Member

    Going on to EDFs cheaper evening and weekend tariff very soon.

    I did the maths and Octopus Go tariff appeared much cheaper

    @phiiiiil oh yes. When we had an ICE at the same time as I had my Model S going to a filling station just felt weird.

    @DT78 charging cables come in various default lengths but given that it’s just cable I’m pretty sure that custom lengths must be available. I think ours is 5m. Give the folks at https://mcnallyev.uk/products/home/ a call. They did a great, subsidised, installation for us. They say on their site “Tethered comes with 5m cable as standard, but that can be upgraded to 10m”
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    Our electricity use wouldn’t support an Economy7-like tariff. Even at just under £0.15/kWh, charging cars is cheaper than petrol I suspect. I doubt charging cars is the principle component in our consumption.

    I have just had a play on the Tesla webpage. A model 3, with towbar and long range 4wd options, so over 300 mile range, would be cheaper PCP than my current A6 avant….. hmm, food for thought…

    I see the Avant is an estate. The Model 3 is a saloon. With a boot. But if you’re happy with a towbar, the Model 3 will be a revelation compared to the clunky drive of any petrol or diesel. The cabin will be a shock after the button-ridden plushness of an Audi. The Model 3 is uber-minimalist. To the point that some folks wonder how to open the doors from the inside (push a button, the door pops open) or outside (push the base of the lever with your thumb).

    We’ve changed to EDF’s EV tarrif which is great for us. The off-peak rate also covers 24hours at weekends rather than just overnight. Some companies only do 4 to 5 hours night rate but EDF is from 9 o’clock until 7 in the morning which is handy when the solar PV can’t top up during the day for free.EDF EV

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