Easily Distracted and lacks focus.

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  • Easily Distracted and lacks focus.
  • Rockape63
    Member

    Toppers Jnr sounds exactly like me at that age. And look how I turned out.

    8)

    Tom_W1987
    Member

    Most primary teachers are women and expect boys to behave and listen as well as girls. Which is partly why so many boys are having adhd medicine thrown at them or why they get turfed out into EBD schools.

    I was called disorganized and off with the fairies all my life and now Im a QA Officer – something that requires high attention levels.

    Go figure. Teachers are mostly cockwombles.

    Edukator
    Member

    Teachers are mostly cockwombles

    and those in the habit of calling teachers cockwombles on a forum with a significant number of teachers?

    QA officer?

    EBD?

    adhd?

    Lego, Meccano, reading with parents, walking into town. Perhaps with a reward – carrot rather than stick. “Would you like to walk into town for a Mac Do’ and see the Christmas lights?”.

    pitduck
    Member

    I would be suspicious of a focused 6 year old,(unless it was digging a hole with a stick) chill out

    RichPenny
    Member

    I’ve had similar feedback about my 5 year old. I took it to be a polite way of saying that she was a pain in the ass. Which she is on occasion! Terminating parents evening with a thumbs up and a cheery “good luck” does not apparently count as being engaged in the educational process 🙁

    My sons 6 but in year 1. His teacher says that she thinks he finds it almost physically painful to sit still! I think shes right!!

    nealglover
    Member

    Most primary teachers are women and expect boys to behave and listen as well as girls

    I’ve asked my other half (who is a female primary teacher) and she said she is actually is aware of the diffence between boys and girls.

    She also said, you are an idiot. (Which apparently a lot of boys are, so don’t worry too much)

    Kuco
    Member

    I thought you had hold of one of my old school reports 🙂

    Teachers are mostly cockwombles.

    Just as well you put ‘mostly’ in there.

    Wouldn’t like either a physical or verbal barny with my stepdaughter!

    rs
    Member

    Sounds like teacher taking the easy option, oh its your kids fault that I can’t teach him or keep him focused. These days, oh he must have a disorder!

    /browsing STW at work just back from the pub at lunch 😕

    Premier Icon ratherbeintobago
    Subscriber

    Toppers Jnr sounds exactly like me at that age. And look how I turned out.

    Did that feature the RAF Regt or is the rock ape username a coincidence?

    OP – us too with 5yo in Year 1. As long as she’s still not like this in secondary…

    Premier Icon plumslikerocks
    Subscriber

    Been said already, but he’s a boy and he’s only 6.

    The problem is with the school and the system really. “Targets” mean that the teaching staff have to try to ram as much into them as possible in as short a period of time. Schools with a fairly bright intake can be especially tough because what they get measured on is the improvement on the baseline at the start of the year or key stage. We noticed this when moving away from urban area to slightly posher neck of the woods I.e. The school push a lot harder.

    Its sh1t really as the kids who aren’t natural academics are getting turned off to learning at a very early stage. Our 6 year old is really struggling with the transition to year 1 and he isn’t the only one in that year group. Parents requested a meeting to complain about the quantity and level of the homework (spelling test for 6yr old FFS!) and were simply told by the head of key stage 1 “well there’s a lot to get through….”

    As others have suggested, you can help by doing things at home that promote focus I.e. Building toys and drawing / painting / craft work.

    Premier Icon Stainypants
    Subscriber

    My 7 years old got exactly the same feedback at parents evening, I found out his teacher had him sat on his own as he was incapable of sitting with other kids without chatting to them.

    Amazingly his behaviour has improved significantly since the teacher has started a daily scorecard on his behaviour and the threat that if his behaviour doesn’t improve there’s no Xbox for Christmas.

    He’s 6, I’d be more concerned that he was happy and enjoying school at that age, school’s probably worried that he’s not going to be focused for the sex education and careers talks next week!!

    toppers3933
    Member

    Thanks everyone. I think my concern is he is going to get put off school because they’re always moaning at him. He’s very bright. Constantly scores highly with maths and spelling and is currently reading David walliams books on his own. We sit and read to him and his sister every night and always have. He will happily sit and build lego for hours. They give him shit books at school that he gets bored with so doesn’t pay any attention to them. So when he’s asked about the book he’s not interested in talking about it so the teacher takes that as he can’t process it not that he doesn’t want to. He takes Ronald Dahl/David walliams/Enid Blyton books to school and sits reading them at break time (people have told us they’ve seen him doing it).
    Anyway I’m just having a moan about it I think. I just wanted to put it out there for people to point out the obvious to me I suppose.
    We’ve scheduled a meeting with his teacher but I’m concerned that I’m going to end up engaging mouth before brain.

    Thanks again.

    RichPenny
    Member

    Parents requested a meeting to complain about the quantity and level of the homework (spelling test for 6yr old FFS!)

    At my daughters school spelling tests started in reception, so when she was 4. She quite likes them tbh.

    Premier Icon funkmasterp
    Subscriber

    What happened to letting kids just be kids. I remember having afternoon naps when I was in primary school. Have they been replaced with essay writing? Lack of attention at six, no shit. I still get easily distracted and I’m 39. Wish I could offer some sound advice OP. My son is two and a half and has the energy of a border collie. I can’t imagine him sitting down for more than five minutes.

    What happened to letting kids just be kids.

    Gove

    timber
    Member

    Maybe he is over achieving, they just aren’t doing enough to keep his interest. Most of my school time was like that, I didn’t focus because I didn’t need to to get the results, so did other disruptive stuff.
    My answers have tended to be concise, I never needed extra paper in exams and lost out in maths exams due to not having any workings, just answers.

    Premier Icon deadkenny
    Subscriber

    I used to get that as a school report all the time 😀

    Was way more interested in day dreaming or what was going on outside than parrot fashion learning times tables, repetitive sums and the like.

    Managed to get through A Level Maths and a degree in Computer Science. Okay, not amazing results, but then other distractions occurred 😀

    I paid more attention to stuff that was actually not boring though.

    daftvader
    Member

    Fwiw…. minivader is 8, bright and intelligent, teachers have said that if you ask him about what’s going on in lessons he has the knowledge and is intelligent, works well in groups and enjoys school…. however his writing and spelling sucks, badly and it’s a struggle to get him to wright stuff down. He lacks focus in class and is very very easily distracted. As far as I am concerned that’s exactly how I was at school, difference being I hated it. And I haven’t don’t too badly they are doing autistic spectrum tests as there is asbergers and dyspraxia in both families…. don’t feel bad about it, you and your lad are not alone in this!

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    My daughter is very smart and an avid reader but really struggles to focus enough to do her writing.

    She has been diagnosed with high-functioning autism and probably has an attention disorder problem.

    Might be worth just having a little read up and seeing if anything strikes a chord.

    TimothyD
    Member

    You might find the Forest School approach to learning interesting, and possibly helpful?

    Having in mind that things like schema are only vague labels or ways of framing the thinking of adults, It’s about looking at children’s ‘learning schema’, and at what they naturally gravitate towards, and then tailoring their learning to that. So, rather than having maths being about sums, if they’re drawn towards playing with stones – one might ask how many stones there are, and use the stones as a way of exploring counting.

    It’d probably be something you’d have to focus on in your own time, unless there’s a school in your area which has a Forest School as part of it.

    It sounds a bit little woolly and hippy-ish perhaps, I’m naturally a little bit cynical of things which can sound hippy-ish (thanks to Dad), but it could be a good way of catching up any ground he loses within the conventional or current education system? Having looked into it, I actually ended up doing a course, to qualify me for taking children into woodlands towards helping them to develop, and to nurture a connection with nature…

    It comes from Finland originally, where their approach to education is very different to our’s. It’s a holistic approach one might say.

    There’s too much involved in it to post on here (I have things to do), but you might find the approach to learning helpful. The people saying it’s because he’s six have probably hit the nail on the head. Young male primates don’t focus as well as female ones by the way, which generally applies to human children as well… 🙂

    TimothyD
    Member

    Beware of the possible over diagnosis of ‘problems’ perhaps?

    Rockape63
    Member

    Did that feature the RAF Regt or is the rock ape username a coincidence?

    It did, many years ago now though, as I left in 85 after 7 years. However despite having no focus and easily distracted at school, I pulled myself together and have done okay since those early days. There’s more than one way to skin a cat!

    Premier Icon plumslikerocks
    Subscriber

    TimD – I think you’ve onto something but the issue is that the educational mould that kids are being squeezed into is now so tight that anyone who doesn’t fit is either an academic write-off at a very early age or has a “problem”. They’re more likely to get help with the latter – even if that help is just more 1:1 attention and a different, more flexible approach to learning.

    Edukator
    Member

    Perhaps the teacher is just pandering to the current generation of parents need to have a fancy sounding label to attach to their kids. But haven’t realised that you belong to the minority of parents who are quite happy to have a “normal” kid who is sometimes a bit lazy, noisy, distracted, bored, frustrated with being stuck in a classroom, uninspired by the work – think back, and perhaps think about how you feel about going to work some days, when it’s not every work day.

    If the kid functions well at home that’s good. Be happy with that.

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    Perhaps the teacher is just pandering to the current generation of parents need to have a fancy sounding label to attach to their kids.

    You sound nice.

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