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  • E bikes – Rock strikes on the motor casing. Should I be concerned?
  • Premier Icon Sanny
    Full Member

    What is the hive mind experience of riding e bikes when it comes to pedal strikes and hitting the motor casing off rocks and root step downs? I’ve been riding an e bike almost exclusively for a few weeks now and am beginning to get a bit concerned about the frequency with which the motor housing is taking some fairly big hits from rock steps and rooty step downs. I’ve adjusted my riding style to manual and pop off them but on steep or rocky descents, that isn’t always an option. There is a fairly substantial bash guard to protect it which looks like it is doing the job it was designed to do but riding Glentress yesterday, I counted at least  seven strikes in the space of only a few hours riding. One was so loud that my riding partner shouted back up the trail as he thought I had had a big off. It became a bit of a standing joke as I clattered the bike off yet another piece of trail.

    I’ve tried several solutions – increasing the pressure in the front and rear shocks, taking less technical lines and even locking out the forks. However, the motor casing sits low and forward of the cranks so I am still experiencing the problem. I have no desire to damage the bike and recognise that the bash guard is there for a reason but it doesn’t stop me being a bit concerned. It’s not unique to this particular model as I’ve noticed it on other brands too that I have ridden.

    So what is the collective experience? Is this a common experience with e bikes? Am I worrying unecessarily? Is it simply a case that I have to accept that I need to adapt my riding style and choose less technical lines? Or am I just the wrong type of rider when it comes to e bikes?

    Thoughts and experiences appreciated.

    Cheers

    Sanny

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Full Member

    I think because they’re a bit hollow they echo more, so sound worse.

    Premier Icon transporter13
    Free Member

    What bike is it?

    Premier Icon Sanny
    Full Member

    I’m not going to say which bike as that would not be fair as I have experienced it with other brands so it is not unique to a particular make or model.

    The challenge I have is that it is extremely rare for me to hit a chainring or bashguard on a normal mountain bike. My worry is that there comes a point where repeated big hits (one yesterday had me briefly thinking I was heading for an off) on the frame will ultimately do damage either to the motor casing, the motor or the frame. Having to lock out the forks on steep terrain isn’t really a viable solution for me. It somewhat defeats the purpose of having suspension!

    So is it just me and the trails I ride that are the issue? Should I just accept that it is going to happen and trust the engineers to have designed in the right level of protection? That said, it is a bit of an inner chimp factor as the nagging thought of will I get through the next technical section of trail without damaging the bike is at the back of my mind.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Never mind rock strikes, the gouldmeister is on an ebike! The climbing clamp of Weegieland wi a battery! Who’d have thought it?!

    😂🤣😂

    They’re the future Sanny!

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

     Is it simply a case that I have to accept that I need to adapt my riding style

    Did it come with a zimmer?

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    do some eMTBs not have the motor rotated up and forward compared to the conventional position to reduce this? If you do not get bashguard strikes on a normal bike but do on the ebike is that a function of weight or BB height?

    Premier Icon escrs
    Free Member

    Depending on the bike there are after market options, most tend to be carbon and just end up cracking

    On the Specialized Levo Berkshire Cycles make a steel bash guard that fits via the battery bolt and covers the lower battery and goes right under and up the back of the motor

    When i fitted mine i placed 2mm thick foam padding between the bash guard and the frame to soften up any hits, works great

    My old Kenevo had no bash guard and got the hell beaten out of the bottom of the motor housing, no damage to the motor and the frame was a bit scarred but the metal in that area was so thick i dont think anything on the trail would of broken it

    Premier Icon martymac
    Full Member

    I wouldn’t be concerned about anything coming off the front wheel damaging the motor, but if you’re hitting it off rocks/roots etc, I would be Worried about that, as you’re basically asking a peice of fairly thin plastic to protect the motor when it’s being skelped with your full weight on it. You may need to reign it in, or buy something with more travel.

    Premier Icon Tracey
    Full Member

    Can only comment on the Turbo Levos we have.
    When running in 650b+ then had a couple of strikes. We have taped the underneath with some thick industrial stuff to stop some of the marks.
    With 29 wheels fitted not managed to catch one yet, but the bikes don’t feel as planted.
    The Berkshire Cycles guards look good but they told me only available for the latest models from 2019 onwards.
    I tend to think that like most things they will be beefed up in that area however only time will tell.

    Premier Icon Sanny
    Full Member

    Nobeer

    Don’t worry, I still prefer the pain and suffering of steep climbs on a normal bike! Ha! Ha! Terrifying how fast I can climb on an e bike though and how steep some of the trails I have ridden up are!

    TJ – it is definitely lower than my normal bike which may be part of the issue.

    Marty – I am beginning to think that reigning it in may have to be the answer as I am very reluctant to keep smacking the bike off rocks on my favourite trails. As for longer travel, it is about as long as you can get.

    Scotroutes – that is just harsh!

    escrs – that is strangely reassuring.

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Full Member

    This used to be the standard approach on dh bikes back in’t day.

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    Casing is as it says, it is just a protective cover, check what the cost of replacement is to make sure it’s not a rip off, they tend to be robust, unless it’s a top end weight saving one. As for the motors, this type of motor has been used across a lot of punishing them bags over the years, knocks shouldn’t affect it too much.

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Full Member

    If you’re striking the motor housing a lot at Glentress, then something else is wrong. Got those shocks pumped up a bit!

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    E-bike specific skillz course required

    Premier Icon Sanny
    Full Member

    The shock sag settings are what the manufacturer recommends so we can safely eliminate that.

    Skillz course? Is there such a thing for e bikes? Perhaps I just need to accept that my riding style / choice of trails & lines and e bikes aren’t great bedfellows.

    tj

    Good point. The bb is lower than on my other bikes by quite some margin. I’ve not ridden enough other e bikes to know if this is design feature common to all and that rock strikes on the casing are accounted for when designing e bikes generally. Heck, it hasn’t broken and the actual performance of the motor and bb haven’t been in any way affected.

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    The shock sag settings are what the manufacturer recommends so we can safely eliminate that.

    That only tells you your sag, what about how the compression/rebound/ramp rate/bottom out are behaving?

    Skillz course? Is there such a thing for e bikes?

    No idea, was just giving the standard STW response

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    Sanny – I borrowed a mates LLS full sus. I normally ride and old school hardtail. I was smacking pedals all over the place. I suspect its more to do with BB height that anything else

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